Pets

Dog Vaccinations

  • Last Updated:
  • Oct 18th, 2016 10:08 pm
[OP]
Jr. Member
Nov 16, 2010
190 posts
95 upvotes
Kitchener

Dog Vaccinations

Hello all,

Looking for some input. I'm looking to bring a new dog into my home. I found an adult dog (6 years old) on Kijiji that I'm interested in.
When I asked the owners about vaccinations I was told that he only had his puppy shots and no annual booster vaccinations since. What's your opinion of this?
21 replies
Sr. Member
Aug 16, 2011
839 posts
245 upvotes
Kitchener
I'm always weary of kijiji for acquiring animals, people lie about their animals temperament and health, happened to me when I got my second dog.
As for no vaccines, obviously the dog will need to get them, I'd be worried that it may not have seen a vet in 6 years.
Newbie
Jul 7, 2007
76 posts
5 upvotes
Some people don't vaccinate their pets for whatever reason and put their dog at risk. Also, the dog may have health problems that you can't physically see, like worms, or worse, like liver disease. Once you take this dog home, any vet bills will be your responsibility. If you take this dog home you can then start taking him to the vet to get annual booster shots.
Newbie
May 11, 2006
7 posts
Toronto
Vaccines for things like rabies which don't exist amongst household dogs lead to cancer and god knows what else.
Clinical studies have found the most common form of cancers to increase 400%.
ps same goes for neutering
Do a google search 3 words: " rabies vaccine cancer " " dog neuter cancer ".
One thing, look specifically for clinical studies, avoid vet sponsored pages.
Good luck.
Newbie
Mar 7, 2007
11 posts
2 upvotes
Canada
Regardless of what the owner says I would take that dog to a vet for checkup. You would need to do the rabies vaccine as it is required by law. The rest is really up to you and if you want you can ask the vet to do titre test to see if the dog has sufficient immunity.
Jr. Member
Jul 17, 2011
163 posts
62 upvotes
BUGSEY wrote:
Sep 26th, 2016 12:50 am
Vaccines for things like rabies which don't exist amongst household dogs lead to cancer and god knows what else.
Clinical studies have found the most common form of cancers to increase 400%.
ps same goes for neutering
Do a google search 3 words: " rabies vaccine cancer " " dog neuter cancer ".
One thing, look specifically for clinical studies, avoid vet sponsored pages.
Good luck.
There are some studies for some breeds (that by no means can be extrapolated to all breeds) that show that EARLY neutering might increase the risk of certain cancers (and no, they are not the most common cancers). On the other hand look up 'perianal adenoma', 'perianal adenocarcinoma', 'leydig cell tumor', 'sertoli cell tumor'. All cancers that have a very much decreased risk of cancer (or non existant) risk in neutered males. Also look up 'prostatitis in dogs', 'perineal hernia dog' and 'benign prostatic hypertrophy' in dogs. All conditions that neutered males almost never get. Also 75% of the dogs that get hit by cars are unneutered (mainly due to increased roaming behaviour). And be welcome to search for all of these in clinical studies.

I am not sure with regard to neutering you are saying to avoid vet sponsored pages. The vast majority of vets will do and recommend what is best for your pet. If they would be looking at money they would recommend no one spaying or neutering their dogs as it leads to a lot more largely preventable diseases that require much more expensive treatment and surgeries than a one off neuter or spay (a lot of those are done at low cost spay/neuter clinics anyway). To give you an example - one surgery and the recovery on an infected uterus is likely to cost the same as 3 or 4 regular spays that don't require intensive treatment. And about 1 in 4 intact females will develop a uterine infection that will require surgery. And then I'm not even mentioning the 25% chance of developing breast cancer (approaching 0% chance in spayed females) intact females have. (http://www.ivis.org/proceedings/iscfr/2012/74.pdf?LA=1 here's your research on that matter).

In addition to that rabies vaccine leading to cancer, that would be an injection site sarcoma and those are extremely rare. And yes it is extremely rare for a dog to get rabies but especially a dog that goes out into the woods is at a small risk of getting rabies, and that is not a pretty death. Contact with saliva of the dog by a person while the dog is building up the disease could transmit the disease to a person and this person will die from it. Also there are issues if the dog (whether rabid or not) bites a person or gets in contact with a potentially rabid animal (quarantine periods).

Not sure if you were referring to Parvo and Distemper vaccines either, but Parvo will kill far more unvaccinated dogs than any possible side effects of the vaccine will in vaccinated dogs.

Edit/addition:
To get back to OP:

I would recommend asking if you are allowed to take the dog to a vet for a check up and if you can have the dog for a day to check whether you are a good fit.
Moderator
User avatar
Jul 5, 2004
23700 posts
3209 upvotes
barbmans wrote:
Sep 28th, 2016 10:18 pm

Not sure if you were referring to Parvo and Distemper vaccines either, but Parvo will kill far more unvaccinated dogs than any possible side effects of the vaccine will in vaccinated dogs.
I was with you until this part. Parvo typically doesn't do any harm to adult dogs, which is what the OP has. At this point, there is likely no reason to give the dog the parvo vaccine.
Member
Aug 1, 2006
409 posts
204 upvotes
Toronto
If you go to the vet and get the core vaccine ( parvovirus, distemper, canine hepatitis ) and 3 year rabies shot, you should be good for at least 3 years. The dog may have worms, so you should get the heartworm test done at the vet and put the dog on a monthly regimen of topical or oral heartworm prevention and flea and tick prevention. Minimum season for this regimen in Canada is April or May till November. I know some people that only give the heartworm prevention every 2 months since it takes about 3 months for the heartworm to grow into a mature adult. I personally have tried both the topical and oral heartworm prevention on my dog and the topical one ( Advantage Multi ) worked out better than the oral because the dog vomited after the oral. For flea and tick prevention I have been using K9 Advantix II topically monthly.
Deal Fanatic
Apr 23, 2009
5153 posts
677 upvotes
South of Ottawa
Bull Dog wrote:
Oct 8th, 2016 10:10 pm
If you go to the vet and get the core vaccine ( parvovirus, distemper, canine hepatitis ) and 3 year rabies shot, you should be good for at least 3 years. The dog may have worms, so you should get the heartworm test done at the vet and put the dog on a monthly regimen of topical or oral heartworm prevention and flea and tick prevention. Minimum season for this regimen in Canada is April or May till November. I know some people that only give the heartworm prevention every 2 months since it takes about 3 months for the heartworm to grow into a mature adult. I personally have tried both the topical and oral heartworm prevention on my dog and the topical one ( Advantage Multi ) worked out better than the oral because the dog vomited after the oral. For flea and tick prevention I have been using K9 Advantix II topically monthly.
There is no location in this country where a dog can get heartworm year round. The temperature has to be consistently above 27C for 2 weeks (night and day) for heartworm to develop. Even then, there are several other things that have to happen for a dog to actually get it.

A 6 year old dog does not need a parvo shot.

Canine hepatitis is kennel cough. Unless your dog is being boarded or in day care and it's a requirement, skip it. The vaccine does not work for every strain.
Jr. Member
Jul 17, 2011
163 posts
62 upvotes
Beachdown wrote:
Oct 9th, 2016 12:12 am


A 6 year old dog does not need a parvo shot.

Canine hepatitis is kennel cough. Unless your dog is being boarded or in day care and it's a requirement, skip it. The vaccine does not work for every strain.
Canine hepatitis is not kennel cough. You are mixing up canine adenovirus 1 and canine adenovirus 2. CAV1 causes liver disease (hence the word hepatitis), CAV2 causes respiratory signs (and can be one of the causes of kennel cough. Other causes could be bordetella, pasteurella or parainfluenza). With regard to a bordetella vaccine (commonly (mis)called 'kennel cough vaccine'): I would also skip it for dogs that are not boarded, don't stay at groomers and just don't see a lot of other dogs. CAV1 vaccines by the way do cross protect against CAV2 infections.

A lot of previously properly vaccinated 6 year old dogs do not need a parvo shot - until there is that 6 year old dog that does...
Shaner wrote:
Oct 8th, 2016 9:45 pm
I was with you until this part. Parvo typically doesn't do any harm to adult dogs, which is what the OP has. At this point, there is likely no reason to give the dog the parvo vaccine.
Typically and likely are the keywords here. Adult dogs are less susceptible to Parvo, but dogs can still get severely affected. "While puppies are most likely to suffer severe disease and death, any unvaccinated dog, of any age, can become infected with CPV." (http://www.sheltermedicine.com/library/ ... ovirus-cpv)

In addition to that that dog would have not had a booster vaccine for distemper or hepatitis, both serious conditions, again more likely to affect young dogs , but adult dogs can get severely affected as well (depending on how long their immunity from their vaccine lasts and how often they were exposed to the natural occuring virus). In general the vaccine that protects against parvo is a three way vaccine that also contains a distemper and a hepatitis vaccine.

For parvo after >3 years far most dogs still have protective antibody numbers, for distemper these numbers are lower, and for infectious hepatitis a bit lower again (though that virus fortunately is not very common).
https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/15119729

So really for a 6 year old dog without a confirmed history of adequate vaccines ('puppy shots' could have meant the dog was vaccinated once, possibly at an age that doesn't guarantee protection - google 'maternal antibody interference') I think the benefits of vaccinating and being safe outweigh the risks of it. If someone would prefer to save a couple of bucks and is OK with the risk of the dog contracting a disease (against which no effective medication is available) that might or might not make the dog very ill (and if the dog does get very ill treatment will be costly and not always effective) that is up to them but to state the dog will be fine and certainly doesn't need the vaccines is oversimplifying things to me.
Deal Addict
Jan 28, 2014
2989 posts
456 upvotes
barbmans - I agree with you. I am not certain of where you are located. In Ontario, I believe that under the new rules that a pup (this also means a senior dog) must have the required vaccines within a year of the first vaccines for a period of a couple of years (e.g. if your pup has the required vaccines on Dec. 14, he/she had better receive the require vaccines again by Dec. 13 or 14 of the following year or it is back to square one - the latter part being for an older dog who did have all of his/her puppy shots but having to go back on the puppy schedule for a couple of years).

Our dog is fully vaccinated including the bortadella and lepto shots. Sure, it won't prevent a dog from catching a different strain but it does help, especially with the recovery. Our current dog caught it once during a semi major event of 2007 but recovered quickly - but somehow did not catch it during a major kennel cough event in Toronto a few years ago. It was really bad.

I do hate the computers that GPs and Vets have to use now. My GP and Vet would prefer to actually speak to the patient or patient's Mommy.

Our dog is on heartworm year round to help prevent against the creepy crawlies that occur in Jan. and Feb. - and so far so good. I am grateful that Heartgard Plus comes in chewable form since he has a double coat and is also a drama queen (and a hoover). So an extra treat and we are certain that the meds go into him. BravEcto for ticks being the same - he had his Oct. 9 dose today - loved it. For a couple of of his 12.5 years he was on topical heartworm due to problems with the manufacturers. A nightmare applying it.

Tomorrow is Cartrogen injection day - Mondays now seem to come around a lot more quickly than they used to. But at least he is not on Metacam with the possible kidney damage. I guess we were lucky that he made it to 12 years and 1 month before the arthritis hit - but it hit suddenly.
Jr. Member
Jul 17, 2011
163 posts
62 upvotes
I'm not aware of the exact rules in Ontario. From an immunological point of view an adult dog should not need booster vaccines within 1 to 3 years (depending on who's research you rely on) after getting a vaccine - but legislation migth lag behind. I THINK if we are looking at things from a legal point of view most North American states/provinces only require a rabies vaccine.
Member
Aug 1, 2006
409 posts
204 upvotes
Toronto
i just vaccinate my dog with the rabies vaccine and core vaccine ( one vaccine containing hepatits, distemper and parvovirus ) . The non core vaccines aren't as safe and don't last as long. The leptospirosis vaccine doesn't prevent the dog from transmitting leptospirosis to humans, so it will mask the disease and make it more likely you will get it since you won't wash your hands as much.
Deal Addict
Jan 28, 2014
2989 posts
456 upvotes
barbmans wrote:
Oct 9th, 2016 3:02 pm
I'm not aware of the exact rules in Ontario. From an immunological point of view an adult dog should not need booster vaccines within 1 to 3 years (depending on who's research you rely on) after getting a vaccine - but legislation migth lag behind. I THINK if we are looking at things from a legal point of view most North American states/provinces only require a rabies vaccine.
Barb - I will check - perhaps it is a Toronto thing? I am not the only one who has been told the same. It might relate only to the rabies vaccine but I have been told (only in the last couple of years - around the time that vets started using computers during the exam) that this is now the law. It is most definitely not a cash grab by our vet!
Deal Addict
Jan 28, 2014
2989 posts
456 upvotes
Bull Dog wrote:
Oct 9th, 2016 8:41 pm
i just vaccinate my dog with the rabies vaccine and core vaccine ( one vaccine containing hepatits, distemper and parvovirus ) . The non core vaccines aren't as safe and don't last as long. The leptospirosis vaccine doesn't prevent the dog from transmitting leptospirosis to humans, so it will mask the disease and make it more likely you will get it since you won't wash your hands as much.
I am concerned about our dog getting lepto - even more so since I met the only survivor of the last outbreak. I will continue to wash my hands as per usual. Each person must decide on his/her own the non-required vaccines and go from there. In our case our dog does not react to the lepto vaccine so he gets it, together with bortadella and BravEcto against ticks.

Top