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Double the hanging space of the closet

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  • Oct 7th, 2016 10:28 am
[OP]
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Jun 7, 2005
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Double the hanging space of the closet

I am planning to move up the rod in the closet to double the hanging space as shown on the video below. I just have one question. Can I screw those rod brackets directly to the drywall (where the studs are located) instead of putting the brackets on the wood board which is nailed to the dry wall (I found all builders installed the closet rod that way though) ?

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Aug 5, 2003
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North York
The wood is used so they have something solid to attach the rod to, without having to worry about where the stud is located (it's rarely where you want to install the rod).

Having an appropriate backing makes sure it won't fall down, now that being said can you get away without? Yes, but it depends on the type of anchor, and length and weight that will be on the rod.
[OP]
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Jun 7, 2005
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I see. But I thought if I put the board on the drywall first, I still need to nail it to the stud ? Or I can just nail the board any where I pick as long as I put enough nails on the board ? And what length of the nail should I use ? The board itself is like 0.5", should I get 1.5" nails? Thanks
cliff wrote:
Oct 5th, 2016 10:08 am
The wood is used so they have something solid to attach the rod to, without having to worry about where the stud is located (it's rarely where you want to install the rod).

Having an appropriate backing makes sure it won't fall down, now that being said can you get away without? Yes, but it depends on the type of anchor, and length and weight that will be on the rod.
Deal Addict
Sep 2, 2004
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You can put the brackets directly on the drywall, but you should still try to attach them to studs. I prefer to use screws for this instead of nails. A 1.5" screw would be ok if going directly on the drywall but if you're attaching the bracket to a half inch board you should definitely use a longer nail.

Putting screws or nails into drywall doesn't have much holding power, even if you do a whole bunch of them. If not going right into a stud, at the least you would need anchors (the white screw in ones are stronger) or toggle bolts.

By the way, the guy in the video must be partially deaf because using air nailer in a closed area like a closet is really loud. You could even tell in his video. Use hearing protection if you're air nailing like that.
[OP]
Deal Fanatic
Jun 7, 2005
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Agree, either on drywall directly or nail the board first, I will need to put them on the studs
Capt. wrote:
Oct 5th, 2016 11:40 am
You can put the brackets directly on the drywall, but you should still try to attach them to studs. I prefer to use screws for this instead of nails. A 1.5" screw would be ok if going directly on the drywall but if you're attaching the bracket to a half inch board you should definitely use a longer nail.

Putting screws or nails into drywall doesn't have much holding power, even if you do a whole bunch of them. If not going right into a stud, at the least you would need anchors (the white screw in ones are stronger) or toggle bolts.

By the way, the guy in the video must be partially deaf because using air nailer in a closed area like a closet is really loud. You could even tell in his video. Use hearing protection if you're air nailing like that.
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Jul 23, 2004
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You don't install a rod by screwing it in the drywall...

You do it the proper way.
Take pieces of 1 x 4 or equivalent size in plywood. Screw each of them securely in at least 2 studs.
Patch the screw holes and paint the installed pieces of wood.
Install the rod by screwing it in the wood piece you installed and painted.


Try installing a rod directly to drywall and then hang a few heavy winter coats. That thing is just gonna rip right out.
Deal Guru
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Oct 6, 2010
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I did a much cooler way. Used flanges and 3/4" pipe. Connected flanges to the ceiling, installed braces into the trusses of the rafters to hold the weight and then created a road map of piping. Have an awesome hanging system in my closet. But yes, you need to secure it to something otherwise the rod will just bend or rip off the wall.
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[OP]
Deal Fanatic
Jun 7, 2005
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I don't mean to install the rod directly on the wall. I was saying to install the rod brackets to the stud of the wall.
AMD wrote:
Oct 5th, 2016 3:11 pm
You don't install a rod by screwing it in the drywall...

You do it the proper way.
Take pieces of 1 x 4 or equivalent size in plywood. Screw each of them securely in at least 2 studs.
Patch the screw holes and paint the installed pieces of wood.
Install the rod by screwing it in the wood piece you installed and painted.


Try installing a rod directly to drywall and then hang a few heavy winter coats. That thing is just gonna rip right out.
Penalty Box
Jun 26, 2009
3220 posts
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GTA
koffey wrote:
Oct 5th, 2016 3:45 pm
I did a much cooler way. Used flanges and 3/4" pipe. Connected flanges to the ceiling, installed braces into the trusses of the rafters to hold the weight and then created a road map of piping. Have an awesome hanging system in my closet. But yes, you need to secure it to something otherwise the rod will just bend or rip off the wall.
Do you have any pictures of that "piping system" ? Seems like a cool idea.
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Tommy74 wrote:
Oct 6th, 2016 10:18 am
koffey wrote:
Oct 5th, 2016 3:45 pm
I did a much cooler way. Used flanges and 3/4" pipe. Connected flanges to the ceiling, installed braces into the trusses of the rafters to hold the weight and then created a road map of piping. Have an awesome hanging system in my closet. But yes, you need to secure it to something otherwise the rod will just bend or rip off the wall.
Do you have any pictures of that "piping system" ? Seems like a cool idea.

I do, but only a few of the initial setup. I used 3/4 galvanised gas pipe. Hold on and I'll post some.

The only issue was cleaning the lines and obviously, making them fit once the installation started due to the way gas lines tighten and adding additional pieces. This isn't the finished product but gives you an idea. Mine is like a massive rail station. It's approx 80" wide and 94" in height. I was able to perform chin-ups when I had the first two bars in place to test the strength. I'm 220lbs.

Image

Image
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[OP]
Deal Fanatic
Jun 7, 2005
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Great idea and cool design. In those big box stores, they are charging $39.99 for just one vertical bar for the closet organization !
koffey wrote:
Oct 6th, 2016 10:23 am
Tommy74 wrote:
Oct 6th, 2016 10:18 am
koffey wrote:
Oct 5th, 2016 3:45 pm
I did a much cooler way. Used flanges and 3/4" pipe. Connected flanges to the ceiling, installed braces into the trusses of the rafters to hold the weight and then created a road map of piping. Have an awesome hanging system in my closet. But yes, you need to secure it to something otherwise the rod will just bend or rip off the wall.
Do you have any pictures of that "piping system" ? Seems like a cool idea.

I do, but only a few of the initial setup. I used 3/4 galvanised gas pipe. Hold on and I'll post some.

The only issue was cleaning the lines and obviously, making them fit once the installation started due to the way gas lines tighten and adding additional pieces. This isn't the finished product but gives you an idea. Mine is like a massive rail station. It's approx 80" wide and 94" in height. I was able to perform chin-ups when I had the first two bars in place to test the strength. I'm 220lbs.

Image

Image
[OP]
Deal Fanatic
Jun 7, 2005
8319 posts
544 upvotes
By the way, I notice why builders always put the board and screw the brackets on the board. Studs are usually not located where we want and need the brackets. Thus, it makes sense to secure the board from those stud first and then screw the brackets on exact location you need on the board.
Deal Guru
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Oct 6, 2010
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Thanks. Gas pipe is much cheaper. The only problem was that when I got most of the material from one big box store, was finding the same at another. I think I spent about $300 in total material, I had 2x4 and screws. FICC, 1 18" pipe is like $12. A T-connecter is like $3. Would also be cheaper if you went 1/2".
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416 REAL T-D0T not 9…
rdx wrote:
Oct 5th, 2016 9:50 am

I have not been in construction for quite a few years. For some reason this video makes me want to get back into it.
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Feb 3, 2005
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rdx wrote:
Oct 6th, 2016 10:40 am
By the way, I notice why builders always put the board and screw the brackets on the board. Studs are usually not located where we want and need the brackets. Thus, it makes sense to secure the board from those stud first and then screw the brackets on exact location you need on the board.
Glad you figured this out before I had to post it... Face With Tears Of Joy

I did this in my walk-in closet... put a nice storage cabinet (a great find at Costco for a ridiculous clearance price) in the middle of the wall... and did double hanging rails (high and low) on one side (for shirts and other short items) and normal single hanging rail on the other side (for pants, dresses, and other long items) I also put shelving over the hanging bars to finish things off and create storage room up top (I didn't use hardware like in that video where the shelf support also was the bar hanging support). Worked out beautifully.

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