Green / Eco-Friendly

Dry towel with dryer load reduces drying time!

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  • Aug 5th, 2008 2:39 pm
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[OP]
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Feb 4, 2004
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Dry towel with dryer load reduces drying time!

I recently heard of a eco tip from someone who had seen it on feedthepig.org

They said that ig you put a dry towel in with your dryer load that you can reduce drying time by %50. My wife experimented with this and she said it does work but she doubts it reduced the time by %50. Can anyone confirm or refute the claims of reduced drying times by this method? If it works...how so?
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Newbie
Dec 2, 2007
43 posts
vancouver
This is from the B.C. Hydro Powersmart website:

Save electricity by using your clothes dryer more efficiently
An electric clothes dryer typically uses the most electricity of any appliance in a home. The way you operate your clothes dryer can affect the amount of energy that it uses.

Clean the lint filter after every load
The lint filter should be cleaned after every load in the dryer. This will improve the efficiency and extend the lifespan of the dryer by ensuring maximum air circulation.

Use the cool-down feature
The cool-down setting allows your clothes to finish drying using the residual heat in the dryer. Note that this setting isn’t helpful if you are drying multiple loads.

Dry multiple loads consecutively
If you are doing more than one load of laundry, dry each new load immediately after the previous load ends (with the cool-down feature turned off). This will reduce the energy required to reheat the dryer.

Avoid over-drying your clothes
Load your dryer with similar clothing types to prevent over drying. Over-drying your clothes wastes unnecessary energy and often damages them. Over-dried clothes may also require more ironing than properly dried clothes.

Use the automatic moisture sensor
If your clothes dryer has an automatic moisture sensor, make sure it is turned on to prevent your clothes from over-drying. Choose a model with a moisture sensor if you are purchasing a new dryer.

Don’t overload the dryer
Overloading the dryer doesn’t give the clothes enough room to tumble, which will increase the time it takes for them to dry.

Throw in a dry towel
When drying heavy loads, adding a dry towel may reduce the time needed to dry the clothes. The towel will absorb excess moisture as the clothes dry. Don’t add wet items to a partially dry load, as the increased moisture will slow the drying process for all the items.


Check your dryer vent periodically
Make sure that your dryer vent is clear of debris, which will save energy and may prevent a fire. Manufacturers typically recommend using rigid venting material instead of plastic vents that may collapse and cause blockages.
Newbie
Jul 23, 2008
7 posts
Toronto
That is a neat tip i've never heard before.. i'll try that this coming winter or on a rainy day!

Thanks!
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Oct 14, 2001
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GMA
It's ironic to see threads about dryer in the "Green/Eco-Friendly" forum. I mean, there's nothing green about using a drier.
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Oct 17, 2006
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wow..thanks for the great tip!!...
;)
[OP]
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Thanh wrote:
Jul 26th, 2008 11:25 pm
It's ironic to see threads about dryer in the "Green/Eco-Friendly" forum. I mean, there's nothing green about using a drier.
Yup. somewhat ironic but most people have em and use em. We try to keep it to a minimum though.
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almostfreeman wrote:
Jul 27th, 2008 12:04 am
Yup. somewhat ironic but most people have em and use em. We try to keep it to a minimum though.
as a true rfder...i use them after 10pm to save on the hydro bill :cheesygri
;)
Newbie
Jul 23, 2008
7 posts
Toronto
I think it's a hard choice to make to go 100% green/eco friendly. at this point in my life I think it's almost more important to find out all you can on how to change your lifestyle, and adapt the way you live to a healthier way of living.. not only for yourself but the environment. Which is why i think the dryer tip at the least is something everyone that uses one should know.
If it helps reduce energy used even a bit it's better than it's worth knowing about.
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Jul 23, 2008
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Good tip! To be honest there are simply some days when you cannot dry clothes using a clothesline, for example, if you lack the adequate space or the weather does not permit such a method. And yes, as the above poster mentioned, most of us try to keep it at a minimum. Better to know than never know! :o
Newbie
Jul 23, 2008
7 posts
Toronto
Don't know if any of you guys live in Ontario but i was just introduced to this site by someone on another Environmental forum.
It's basically a site run by the Ontario Government that gives normal people or home owners a chance to save a bunch of money when buying new and more environmental products for their homes. Pretty net I thought that the government is doing this.. very, very important.

if anyones interested or if you know anyone that lives here let them know about this... theres a ton more info about the environment and living better on the site, but the saving money caught my eye automatically.. sad but true. haha.

GREEN!
Newbie
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Jul 23, 2008
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Speaking of which I tried the tip (it was raining!) and it works! But I have to remember to check on the dryer to see how my laundry is doing so I don't leave my clothes in for too long. I never realized how irresponsible it was to leave the clothes in for the allotted time the machine has been programmed to run, what a waste of energy.

Totally OT but welcome to the forums Mantranga. That site you recommended is pretty good. Though I alt+tabbed right when that lady walked on screen and when she suddenly spoke I was a little surprised (jumped actually, lol). I think I'm not gonna get any work done today after you introduced me that website!
Newbie
Jul 23, 2008
7 posts
Toronto
haha, the lady is surprising! I think it's a good site.. definitely going to look into the products more.
Deal Addict
Dec 18, 2005
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MtX wrote:
Jul 31st, 2008 12:14 pm
Throwing in a tennis ball helps as well...it helps loosen up the fabric so it dries faster
They conceptually work the same as the dryer balls that people put into their dryer, although I'm not sure if tennis balls are meant to be heated this hot for such a prolonged period, and what types of unintended noxious fumes and chemicals are released as a result.
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Jul 23, 2008
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Actually I use tennis balls to fluff up my down jackets so they aren't all flat after being washed...I hope it doesn't release noxious fumes. :(
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