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Locked: Duct Sealing - Updated -Aeroseal

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[OP]
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May 10, 2005
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Duct Sealing - Updated -Aeroseal

UPDATE:
This was an interesting thread for me. I had a problem and there was lots of debate and some good information. So, in the end I got my ducts sealed. There is lots of info in the thread but I will try to re-cap and what I did.
As a matter of background, we have a 40 year old house and over recent years have gotten new windows and doors, new furnace and A/C and, added significant insulation in my attic. All that and more to save energy and make our home more comfortable.
One continuing problem was the airflow to some of the rooms was somewhat weak and as a result I have to balance my ducts every Spring and Winter and even during the seasons depending on how hot and cold it would get. Even then there were still cold/hot (depending on the season) spots in my house.
I have access to only perhaps about 20 to 25% of my ductwork and used metal tape and mastic on what I could reach to seal the ductwork but, 75% of them were in the walls or in ceilings and I could not do anything about those.
I saw an advertisement for Aeroseal and it made sense to me. I called them and to my surprise, they were able to come out within a few days. I must say, it was surely an effort to set up the tests but it sure does demonstrate the shortcomings of my ductwork installation. To my amazement, when they sealed all the vents and did the pressure test, my ductwork had a leak rate of 254 cubic feet per minute (equivalent to a 48 square inch hole)....Hmmmm, no wonder the back rooms were cool, they were getting no air! Fortunately, when they finished the application, while not completely sealed, it was a mere 31 CFM (6 sq in hole).
It took all day to set up the equipment and do the pressure test and then the sealing procedure. When they injected the sealing compound, parts of my house became all fogged up. The stuff was escaping out of every crack and joint and leak in the ducts.
Once they were done, the Aeroseal process had really done a good job of sealing the leaks. I immediately felt a huge difference in airflow to all the vents and especially the back bedrooms and the vents furthest away from the furnace. The very next day, I was in the basement re- balancing the ducts, closing some dampers and opening other dampers, and because the basement work areas vents were always closed off, I noticed how cold it was down there...a direct result of no leaking heat, I had to open a vent.
Today, I am very pleased with the outcome. I have proper airflow to all my rooms and I know when I “tune” my ducts from now on, the rooms will be the right temperatures and get sufficient airflow. One of the good things is I seem to have stopped heating wall spaces and ceiling cavities. To be honest, it is too early to tell if I will save any money on energy costs but, the comfort level of my home is significantly better than before the Aeroseal treatment and really, that is, to us, as important.
There is one thing though. Like I said, I have an old house with 15 amp circuits. They have to plug in a lot of stuff, fans, generators, compressors, heaters etc. Lots of equipment. This overloaded some circuits and the breakers popped. We had to find different circuits to plug into so we had extension cords all over the place. they need to get equipment that doesn't draw so much power.
I am pleased with what it did. It ain't cheap and may not be cost recoverable but, the comfort level in my house is so much better it was more than worth it for me.

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So, in my job jar one of the tasks is to seal my old ducts. I have, over the years, gotten a high efficiency furnace, extra attic insulation, new windows and doors and there are still cold spots in my (fairly) old house. The next step was to seal the ducts to ensure the heat (and AC) gets to those areas.
I have used some metal tape in and around the furnace ducting (close to the furnace) and was going to buy some mastic and do the other joints soon. The thing is that only about 25 to 30% of the ducting is really accessible to be able to seal it properly.
So yesterday, in amongst the junk mail, is a local company selling a product that seems to be perfect for me. The product is AeroSeal. http://aerosealcanada.com/
A little research and I found the product and process getting awards and good comments, other than the cost. The cost seems to vary greatly. (and yes, I did search the forums and there were a couple older posts without much discussion or debate).
As everyone is looking for ways to save energy, ensure proper ventialtion in their living spaces, even many threads on curing hot and cold areas of the house (and yes, I am a big proponent of balancing the ducts and do thios regularily in my house), there may be other alternatives.
It seems to me that Aeroseal may be a good soloution to seal the areas of the ductwork that I cannot access. I am wondering if anyone has any experience or comments or knows of any one who has used this product?
Life is short......Make sure you spend as much time as possible on the internet arguing with strangers about politics :). Anonymous
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Mar 3, 2009
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Toronto
Sounds interesting...anyone have an estimate on cost to apply? anyone have it done?
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Oct 22, 2007
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Mississauga
Thanks for the information Pete, after doing a quick reading it doesn't sound as though this is a diy process, but still curious as to the cost.
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Mar 24, 2008
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Very interesting, but I can't find any mention of CSA Approval for use in Canada??
Anyone find an MSDS sheet on the product?

Another interesting read on the product.
http://www.acsmonroe.info/aeroseal-duct-sealing/
The only place you're going to find a helping hand, is at he end of your own wrist. Joe Mondello
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Oct 22, 2007
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I found this quote while doing a search and this pricing is in the U.S. so you can just imagine it's more expensive in Canada. Mind you the size of home, location etc, will obviously effect the price.

"Aeroseal says the average (nationwide) cost to home owners is $1,100 - $1,500. "

I've read in another search that it can easily be over $2000.00. Unfortunatly a little to rich for me blood, but I do appreciate the info.
[OP]
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May 10, 2005
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Maymybonneliveforever wrote:
Feb 14th, 2013 10:17 am
I found this quote while doing a search and this pricing is in the U.S. so you can just imagine it's more expensive in Canada. Mind you the size of home, location etc, will obviously effect the price.

"Aeroseal says the average (nationwide) cost to home owners is $1,100 - $1,500. "

I've read in another search that it can easily be over $2000.00. Unfortunatly a little to rich for me blood, but I do appreciate the info.
I found those prices too and it is more than I would like to spend. I also agree that that is quite a lot and the payback may be a long time but, on the other hand, I cannot get at a good portion of the ducting in the house so I would not be able to seal it myself.
So, perhaps it has to be looked at from the repair and improvement aspect as opposed to energy savings and payback. Fixing a problem really has no payback to it, just ensuring that the ducts are functioning properly.
Life is short......Make sure you spend as much time as possible on the internet arguing with strangers about politics :). Anonymous
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Dec 10, 2004
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Kanata
Saw this yesterday in the flyer magazine that came this week, was really interesting to read. Makes sense though have not heard of anyone using it yet.
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Oct 24, 2012
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I doubt you'd save much on heating costs. The leaks are indoors so that heat still stays indoor (mostly). Cold spots in a house are mostly caused by poor insulation and/or bad routing of the air flow.

I say just try to foil tape what you can access, especially around the furnace where the biggest joints (hence biggest leaks) are located.
What you might want to try is to find hot spots (places getting too much air) and reducing the size of the register so that pressure builds up high enough to reach the rooms getting less air.

After that, you might want to look into adding insulation in the cold areas. I have a bathroom that has 3 exterior walls (corner of the house, one of the 3 exterior walls is against the unheated garage). That room gets very cold not because of the ducting but because of the exterior walls being poorly insulated.

For 2000$, you could instead increase your attic insulation and seal your basement rim&band joists with spray foam. Target the spots that cause most of the heat loss in the house as a whole and seal them.
If the cold spots aren't resolved, look into tiny electric baseboards that work off 120V and can be attached to walls, such as this. They'll do the job at adding a bit more heat for those cold spots.
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Nov 5, 2006
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Toronto
The hvac guys on my job Site use dyn-o-seal. Applies with a brush, wear Gloves

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Dec 31, 2007
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Richmond Hill
o0vL wrote:
Feb 15th, 2013 3:50 pm
The hvac guys on my job Site use dyn-o-seal. Applies with a brush, wear Gloves
Implies that one would need direct access to the area that needs the seal, not what OP is looking for.
[OP]
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May 10, 2005
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alkizmo wrote:
Feb 15th, 2013 10:44 am
I doubt you'd save much on heating costs. The leaks are indoors so that heat still stays indoor (mostly). Cold spots in a house are mostly caused by poor insulation and/or bad routing of the air flow.

I say just try to foil tape what you can access, especially around the furnace where the biggest joints (hence biggest leaks) are located.
What you might want to try is to find hot spots (places getting too much air) and reducing the size of the register so that pressure builds up high enough to reach the rooms getting less air.

After that, you might want to look into adding insulation in the cold areas. I have a bathroom that has 3 exterior walls (corner of the house, one of the 3 exterior walls is against the unheated garage). That room gets very cold not because of the ducting but because of the exterior walls being poorly insulated.

For 2000$, you could instead increase your attic insulation and seal your basement rim&band joists with spray foam. Target the spots that cause most of the heat loss in the house as a whole and seal them.
If the cold spots aren't resolved, look into tiny electric baseboards that work off 120V and can be attached to walls, such as this. They'll do the job at adding a bit more heat for those cold spots.
o0vL wrote:
Feb 15th, 2013 3:50 pm
The hvac guys on my job Site use dyn-o-seal. Applies with a brush, wear Gloves
Both you guys don't read or comprehend very well.
Thanks for the advice but if you read the posts, you would see that insulation was upgraded, that windows and doors were too, that balancing the ducts were done and are done when heating/cooling seasons change.
That tape and sealing was already done. That there is only access to 30% of the ductwork in the house implying 70% is inaccessible and tape or Dyn-o-seal mastick is unusable). That energy savings was not the issue (so why would you want to waste more energy by using electric baseboards), and comfort using existing heating in all rooms is the key.
Hence, a product such as this may make sense for some homes.
Life is short......Make sure you spend as much time as possible on the internet arguing with strangers about politics :). Anonymous
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Jan 10, 2010
348 posts
34 upvotes
Oakville
Hello i am from Aeroseal Canada hope i can answer some of your questions and comments

Aeroseal was just approved in Canada has been in the USA for 10 years was developed by US Department of Energy it is patented it is the only way to seal your ducts from the inside.

Aeroseal has performed the seal on places such as the Ottawa Hospital and the Wynn Casino in las vegas

We have 10 new dealers offering the technology across Canada and growing quickly the technology will seal any cracks fractures pin holes and general leakage points up to 5/8 of an inch we do a pre diagnostic before we do the application to see how much your home is leaking most homes are currently leaking 30% or higher and the surprising thing is that is for new and older homes the code for ducts is not very efficient.

The application takes 2 hours the entire job takes 5 hours with pre and post diagnostics , we can usually seal tight to 98% so homeowners get savings off there energy bill from $200.00 to $900.00 year depending on size of home however the biggest selling point is no more hot and cold rooms most homes have that one room that is cold in the winter and too warm in the summer Aeroseal will get all rooms to within 1 degree for the entire home , once you put your foot over the return you can feel the difference the air flow is now going to where it was intended to go.

The cost is $1500.00 for the average home hoping to get rebates as the government introduces more energy conservation programs.

We have performed over 60 seals in the past 4 months all with great results Aeroseal is a proven technology with over 80,000 seals in the USA

We recently did a seal for a well known television show and was recommended.

The website you can get more info from www.aerosealcanada.com if you require any other info on this green initiative please just ask
Member
Jan 10, 2010
348 posts
34 upvotes
Oakville
Further to my last post Aeroseal has access to every section of a homes duct work does not matter if its accessible or not we seal from the inside when we are finished most homes will be sealed to 98%.

We pressurize the duct work with our Aeroseal patented solution that can be pressurized so it is airborne the product is looking for anywhere to escape since we close off and seal all the returns there is no where the solution can go it is looking for anywhere to escape it seeks out holes so if you have any cracks or leakage it will find it and the compound seals immediately on the hole the seals have a 10 year guarantee.

Your furnace will perform better and you will save money.

This process is well known in the HVAC community and is recognized as the only effective way to seal the duct work.
[OP]
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May 10, 2005
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Osgoode3, thanks for chiming in. Thanks for the information about the cost.
I would like to know more about any rebates that I may be eligible for. Are you a company that qualifies for me to get money back?
Do the ducts have to be cleaned before you do the job or, do you clean the ducts as part of your process? I cannot imagine you doing the sealing if there are dust bunnies and other foreign materials in the ductwork.
Do you use cameras to inspect all the runs?
Do you do the return ducts as well?
Life is short......Make sure you spend as much time as possible on the internet arguing with strangers about politics :). Anonymous

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