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  • Apr 24th, 2017 11:49 pm
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Nov 15, 2008
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death_hawk wrote:
Apr 11th, 2017 3:56 pm
This is also why I also weigh my eggs. It's a pain in the butt having 5/16th of an egg but there's always something I can do with it.
lol well I have these old fussy cake recipes that say, add a tablespoon of milk and if you already have 3 eggs in...you're up by a tablespoon of egg already.
death_hawk wrote:
Apr 11th, 2017 3:56 pm
This is why cups/tablespoons/etc is a stupid way of cooking when you want precision.
I have a US set of wet and dry cups, a Canadian set of dry cups (10% more!) and a scale for Euro stuff. If I have an old recipe and I want it to fit in my pan/bottle, I make sure to use the US set. Modern recipes local made with big eggs and 500g pounds and 250 ml cups, I use the Canadian set. My generous sized set. Then you keep the right ratio of wet:dry: fat.
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Aug 22, 2006
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Yeah... I'd just be converting all my recipes to metric.
Usually I don't use metric in the kitchen, but for weights and measures I do.
Temperatures and price per weight however is still FreedomUnits
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May 9, 2006
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You'd think with all the steroids and selective breeding to make chickens bigger and meatier, eggs sizes would be bigger now.
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Jun 21, 2016
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walmart eggs are not small

xlarge is HUGE and large is big
[OP]
Penalty Box
Dec 2, 2007
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Are you sure Walmart eggs are big?
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May 2, 2009
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lecale wrote:
Apr 11th, 2017 4:16 pm

I have a US set of wet and dry cups, a Canadian set of dry cups (10% more!) and a scale for Euro stuff. If I have an old recipe and I want it to fit in my pan/bottle, I make sure to use the US set. Modern recipes local made with big eggs and 500g pounds and 250 ml cups, I use the Canadian set. My generous sized set. Then you keep the right ratio of wet:dry: fat.
OMG. I have been baking since I was six. I have imported American flour to make recipes from magazines, for awhile my hobby was to bake any cake on the cover of a cooking magazine.

I did not know there was a difference between Canadian and American wet/dry cup measures.

I have baked by weight with good results. Learn something every day.
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bonterra wrote:
Apr 12th, 2017 12:41 am
OMG. I have been baking since I was six. I have imported American flour to make recipes from magazines, for awhile my hobby was to bake any cake on the cover of a cooking magazine.

I did not know there was a difference between Canadian and American wet/dry cup measures.

I have baked by weight with good results. Learn something every day.
Well maybe it is what death_hawk was saying about measuring cups not always being that accurate. But in Canada, if a device says 250 ml/1 cup, which is it? It can't be both, because a cup is 236.6 ml. What the heck do you call that, Metric-dominant Imperial measuring cups? I have a set of these anyway.

I have a set of Cambo Camwear that I love for true US measurements. Somehow this soothes my OCD (jk, but you know it's really something like that. E.g., 1 US cup vs. 250 ml flour difference is 7 grams, water difference is 13.4 ml, none of this is going to kill a recipe).
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lecale wrote:
Apr 12th, 2017 1:11 am

I have a set of Cambo Camwear that I love for true US measurements. Somehow this soothes my OCD (jk, but you know it's really something like that. E.g., 1 US cup vs. 250 ml flour difference is 7 grams, water difference is 13.4 ml, none of this is going to kill a recipe).
Well it's not going to kill a recipe but it's not going to lead to perfection. Lol!! I'll have to post some images of my Angel Food Cake experiments.
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Aug 22, 2006
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bonterra wrote:
Apr 12th, 2017 12:41 am
I did not know there was a difference between Canadian and American wet/dry cup measures.
This is why I never trust any baking recipe that has anything but weights.
Heck I barely trust regular recipes without weights which is why I actually paid money to Chefsteps.
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death_hawk wrote:
Apr 12th, 2017 1:25 am
This is why I never trust any baking recipe that has anything but weights.
Heck I barely trust regular recipes without weights which is why I actually paid money to Chefsteps.
I'm pretty fanatical about weights and measures but I usually do my own conversions. I use the USDA nutrient database a lot...e.g., I want to take out butter/margarine from a carrot cake and sub in coconut cream....how much, based on fat content, do I need? I can do that kinda math all day lol
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Aug 22, 2006
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lecale wrote:
Apr 12th, 2017 2:00 am
I'm pretty fanatical about weights and measures but I usually do my own conversions. I use the USDA nutrient database a lot...e.g., I want to take out butter/margarine from a carrot cake and sub in coconut cream....how much, based on fat content, do I need? I can do that kinda math all day lol
Me too.
I don't know how accurate it is, but I use http://www.aqua-calc.com/calculate/food ... -to-weight for those things I don't want to do myself.
If I can't find it (or I can't remember the website) I bust out my drugThousandth of a gram precision scale and weigh whatever I'm using.
Or my regular scale if it's more than 100g.
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Mar 4, 2011
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bonterra wrote:
Apr 12th, 2017 12:41 am
OMG. I have been baking since I was six. I have imported American flour to make recipes from magazines, for awhile my hobby was to bake any cake on the cover of a cooking magazine.

I did not know there was a difference between Canadian and American wet/dry cup measures.

I have baked by weight with good results. Learn something every day.
I'm like you and I should have known better as I remember when you bought Canadian gas by the gallon. You couldn't just do a dollar comparison between US and Canadian gas - you had to take into account that 1 imperial gallon = 1.2 American gallons. Now I'm looking suspiciously at my collection of measuring cups, wondering which are Canadian or American and which are 250ml or 1 cup.
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Aug 17, 2008
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Sask.
Don't notice a difference in large eggs at all.
But last week, husband bought medium eggs because that's all the store had - wow, they are so mini!
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Sep 4, 2016
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joeyjoejoe wrote:
Apr 11th, 2017 4:43 pm
You'd think with all the steroids and selective breeding to make chickens bigger and meatier, eggs sizes would be bigger now.
Steroids don't make everything bigger.
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Feb 9, 2012
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lecale wrote:
Apr 11th, 2017 3:41 pm
I think the tuna is the same but the size of your slice of bread is bigger, requiring more tuna coverage. Bread has gotten bigger and thicker since I was a kid.
The usual Wonder bread etc is the same 675g loaf it has been for years, but some of the other "Premium" loaves (ie country harvest etc) have gotten smaller. A 680g loaf might now be only 600g.
That's where the size of each slice might be larger, (if you're lucky) but less slices.
An average Tuna tin has been 170g (156g drained) for many many years.

As for the eggs, I don't notice the small eggs getting any smaller, but the medium and large seem smaller. Extra large sometimes looks like large to me.

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