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Dec 27, 2009
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So out of curiousity I weighed the two eggs (large size) that I used to make my cupcake recipe last night. Both were just over 60g which seems to be in line with the 2-2.25oz for large eggs that I think has been standard for quite some time?
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Chickinvic wrote:
Apr 14th, 2017 2:37 pm
So out of curiousity I weighed the two eggs (large size) that I used to make my cupcake recipe last night. Both were just over 60g which seems to be in line with the 2-2.25oz for large eggs that I think has been standard for quite some time?
It's 56g for a large egg. I weighed a bunch out of a (size large) pack I had and they came in at 54g - 64g so there you go. Eggs have natural variation, even in the dozen from the store.
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http://laws-lois.justice.gc.ca/eng/regu ... .html#h-22

As far as I can tell, the previous legislation covering from 2006 had the exact same weights for all sizes except Extra large which was 64g instead of 63g.
I can't imagine that anyone would be able to tell the difference noticeably by 1g in one size.

Also lecale is buying illegal eggs since some of this eggs weigh below 56g.
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death_hawk wrote:
Apr 14th, 2017 4:36 pm
Also lecale is buying illegal eggs since some of this eggs weigh below 56g.
How do I get a hold of the egg police :D ?
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I once saw someone put eggs from a XL box and put in what looked like the smaller sized egg box.
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This thread is fascinating!

I haven't noticed a difference in the size of eggs between Canada or the USA, but honestly, I'm not that picky about egg sizes...actually I find the smaller specialty eggs a cool novelty.

Also, the McDonald's Egg McMuffin eggs seem the same size as ever.

@death_hawk I'm thinking that finding a 54g Large Egg when they are "supposed" to be 56g... maybe they are allowed to have some reasonable variation, but the average in a dozen has to be about 56g?
(2) When eggs are inspected at a place other than where they were graded or packed, not more than 10 per cent of the total number of eggs examined may be undergrade and not more than seven per cent of the total number of eggs examined may be undergrade by reason of causes other than cracked shells.
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peanutz wrote:
Apr 15th, 2017 5:25 am
@death_hawk I'm thinking that finding a 54g Large Egg when they are "supposed" to be 56g... maybe they are allowed to have some reasonable variation, but the average in a dozen has to be about 56g?
That's interesting. I never read it (outside the chart) but I'm surprised that "not less" has provisions like "not more than 10% can be under"
That wording also makes it sound like they're being inspected off site, then shipped somewhere else to be packed.

Not that it's a HUGE issue for me, because if I wanted a full replicable recipe I still weigh my eggs.
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death_hawk wrote:
Apr 11th, 2017 3:56 pm
This is also why I also weigh my eggs. It's a pain in the butt having 5/16th of an egg but there's always something I can do with it.


This is why cups/tablespoons/etc is a stupid way of cooking when you want precision.
Even between different tablespoons I have like a 20% variance between models.
You literally have one job.
LOL so true. When I had to create and then write out standardized recipes back in the day, I used to have to specify eggs in OUNCES and you MUST WEIGH them. YES WEIGH them, on the scale and everything!!! I would also get the question "what do I do with half an egg". So I would take them into the cooler with the breakfast buffet prep and show them the 10 containers of cracked eggs ready to go for the next morning. To be honest the dope the commies smoked back then wasn't nearly as potent as to what they get into now, so I couldn't even imagine dealing with stuff like that these days... Of course grams would make it all the more accurate and the commies might just understand grams better, from experience LOL

Yeah standard cups or spoon are a joke... I try to train our young apprentae that if they insist on using cups or tablespoons instead of scaling out the measurements converting the recipes to weights and then rewriting new recipes we have in trial. That it is vital that they use the same brand/make of cup or tablespoon for the ENTIRE recipe. They don't of course, because apprentae know it all, (just like I thought I did LOL) So when the results aren't consistent during the 5 to 6 times we usually test out new products, they ask what could have gone wrong....

So, as a refresher course in obedience, I show them YET again that the five different "brands/makes" of measuring cups we have. All weigh different amounts for the "same" sized measure. ie one cup of sugar will weigh 8.5 oz another brand of cup will weigh 9.14 oz. Since baking recipes developed with volume measurements like cups are usually a percentage formula, it often doesn't matter what you use to measure it out as long as the entire recipe is measured using the same brand/make of cup. The yield will of course be different but the formulation will be correct, so we can evaluate what we want to change if anything, make adjustments and then standardize the recipe in weight form.
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My favorite was when I was in a kitchen that had weights for half of the recipe.
Like why am I measuring ketchup by the mL? You couldn't weigh it once so I don't have to use a stupid measuring cup?

On top of that, they had "standard" forms. So everything would be in grams by default.
This is all well and good if people changed it.
Nope.
I got a recipe for "2g - Large garlic clove"
"Obviously" it meant that "2 large garlic cloves" but who am I to question it.
So I asked my chef. He said 2g.
Later on another chef came by and asked why so little garlic. I was like "it says 2g" he said "no, 2 large garlic cloves"
Then why did it say 2g?
Canuck2fan wrote:
Apr 15th, 2017 9:30 pm
LOL so true. When I had to create and then write out standardized recipes back in the day, I used to have to specify eggs in OUNCES and you MUST WEIGH them. YES WEIGH them, on the scale and everything!!! I would also get the question "what do I do with half an egg". So I would take them into the cooler with the breakfast buffet prep and show them the 10 containers of cracked eggs ready to go for the next morning.
LOL
Sounds about right.
Make things idiot proof, and someone will come up with a better idiot.
To be honest the dope the commies smoked back then wasn't nearly as potent as to what they get into now, so I couldn't even imagine dealing with stuff like that these days... Of course grams would make it all the more accurate and the commies might just understand grams better, from experience LOL
I don't know... ounces (or eights maybe) might be better.

Yeah standard cups or spoon are a joke... I try to train our young apprentae that if they insist on using cups or tablespoons instead of scaling out the measurements converting the recipes to weights and then rewriting new recipes we have in trial. That it is vital that they use the same brand/make of cup or tablespoon for the ENTIRE recipe. They don't of course, because apprentae know it all, (just like I thought I did LOL) So when the results aren't consistent during the 5 to 6 times we usually test out new products, they ask what could have gone wrong....

So, as a refresher course in obedience, I show them YET again that the five different "brands/makes" of measuring cups we have. All weigh different amounts for the "same" sized measure. ie one cup of sugar will weigh 8.5 oz another brand of cup will weigh 9.14 oz. Since baking recipes developed with volume measurements like cups are usually a percentage formula, it often doesn't matter what you use to measure it out as long as the entire recipe is measured using the same brand/make of cup. The yield will of course be different but the formulation will be correct, so we can evaluate what we want to change if anything, make adjustments and then standardize the recipe in weight form.
I'm constantly amazed at how off measuring cups are.
You have one job. How do you screw it up?
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death_hawk wrote:
Apr 15th, 2017 11:08 pm
My favorite was when I was in a kitchen that had weights for half of the recipe.
Like why am I measuring ketchup by the mL? You couldn't weigh it once so I don't have to use a stupid measuring cup?

I'm constantly amazed at how off measuring cups are.
You have one job. How do you screw it up?
Pretty much the norm for lots of places I have worked. Which have all been non chain establishments so there tend be a lot of family recipes that the owners get bent if you DARE to change how it is measured. My favorite was the owner getting mad every time she had to make this gluten free quick bread recipe that had 1 2/3 cups plus 2 tsps of gluten free flour mix, 1/2 cup plus 1 tsp of milk. I said why not just weigh it once.... OOOHHHH we can't that, this is someone's mother's, uncle's, half brother who is twice removed on their great aunt's side and we don't want to offend them when they come in here twice a year to have it. OK as good a reason as any I guess to keep it up... It is without a doubt though one of the best gluten free products I have ever seen though, and people will pay stupid money for it. LOL

I don't know why there is such a variance in size, but it is vast in some different brands for sure. I guess once they make the dies for injection or thermoforming them no one checks... Besides once have gone that far, it is too expensive to change it anyhow.
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I find old recipes say from the 20's and 30's are fussy (e.g., the scant cup, a cup less a tablespoon, and instructions like that). I guess households didn't have scales and they did the best they could.

The weird thing is how baking by cups has continued on into the present. I mean there is stuff - butter, corn syrup - that it is a real pain to measure and scrape out of a cup. It's a pleasure to do a pecan pie by weight and totally onerous by liquid measure.

I have all kinds of recipes - US, euro, historical, Asian, etc...I just try to match the measuring equipment the author used the best I can. Ever cooked anything from the Donna Hay books (Australian)? In Australia a tablespoon = 20 ml or 4 teaspoons (vs. 15 ml/3 tsp here).

Growing up we had chickens and eggs in two sizes: large+ egg layers Rhode Island Reds or similar and bantams like Araucanas ("easter egg chicken", they lay blue, green, pinkish etc.) Anyway the small Araucanas only lay an egg at is 2/3 the size of a regular egg, true pee wee size. The best way to get rid of a load of eggs is bake cake and freeze and these freaking non-standard Araucana eggs were the bane of my existence. I'd use a liquid measure, beat them and pour off the little excess.

Ironically now that I am more likely to scale down a recipe more than anything and actually need 2/3 an egg, I miss these little partial eggs.
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Canuck2fan wrote:
Apr 16th, 2017 12:26 pm
Pretty much the norm for lots of places I have worked. Which have all been non chain establishments so there tend be a lot of family recipes that the owners get bent if you DARE to change how it is measured. My favorite was the owner getting mad every time she had to make this gluten free quick bread recipe that had 1 2/3 cups plus 2 tsps of gluten free flour mix, 1/2 cup plus 1 tsp of milk. I said why not just weigh it once.... OOOHHHH we can't that, this is someone's mother's, uncle's, half brother who is twice removed on their great aunt's side and we don't want to offend them when they come in here twice a year to have it. OK as good a reason as any I guess to keep it up... It is without a doubt though one of the best gluten free products I have ever seen though, and people will pay stupid money for it. LOL
allmywat.jpg

I get it. it's THEIR recipe. And that's how they grew up measuring.
I don't know why there is such a variance in size, but it is vast in some different brands for sure. I guess once they make the dies for injection or thermoforming them no one checks... Besides once have gone that far, it is too expensive to change it anyhow.
I'm not sure I buy it. I mean... the initial mold should have been made with one that's precise.
But exactly where are THEY getting their measurements?
I wonder if I could phone up the bureau of weights and measures and be like "Yo, hook me up with a 1 cup measure"
And then whoever is marking the prototype doesn't understand what a meniscus is.
lecale wrote:
Apr 16th, 2017 1:24 pm
I find old recipes say from the 20's and 30's are fussy (e.g., the scant cup, a cup less a tablespoon, and instructions like that). I guess households didn't have scales and they did the best they could.
Haven't scales been a thing for quite a while?
Then again... looking at the number of households that don't have scales NOW, maybe they didn't have them back then either.
The weird thing is how baking by cups has continued on into the present. I mean there is stuff - butter, corn syrup - that it is a real pain to measure and scrape out of a cup.
https://www.oxo.com/products/preparing/ ... suring-cup

That's the device I use for converting from imperial to metric.
It still has some quirks but it's nicer than a regular cup.
It's a pleasure to do a pecan pie by weight and totally onerous by liquid measure.
Try internet sauce recipes.
I tried a few BBQ sauces from the internet and "HEY! Let's use 40 ingredients!"
Yeah that was fun converting to weight.

I have all kinds of recipes - US, euro, historical, Asian, etc...I just try to match the measuring equipment the author used the best I can. Ever cooked anything from the Donna Hay books (Australian)? In Australia a tablespoon = 20 ml or 4 teaspoons (vs. 15 ml/3 tsp here).

Growing up we had chickens and eggs in two sizes: large+ egg layers Rhode Island Reds or similar and bantams like Araucanas ("easter egg chicken", they lay blue, green, pinkish etc.) Anyway the small Araucanas only lay an egg at is 2/3 the size of a regular egg, true pee wee size. The best way to get rid of a load of eggs is bake cake and freeze and these freaking non-standard Araucana eggs were the bane of my existence. I'd use a liquid measure, beat them and pour off the little excess.
Ai ya.
I mean... different cultures, different measuring.
But that would just annoy me having to have 4 different cups.

Ironically now that I am more likely to scale down a recipe more than anything and actually need 2/3 an egg, I miss these little partial eggs.
LOL
Maybe we'll all move to metric recipes and supermarkets will change from a box of larges to a box of whatever the hell we had on hand.
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bonterra wrote:
Apr 13th, 2017 1:33 am
Incoming dumb question...if I buy a set of measuring cups and dry measures from amazon.com, made in the USA, they should be the American measure size, right?

I am terrible with numbers, I can't see calculating the difference for every recipe. Would rather just buy a second set of measuring cups etc..
The reality is it shouldn't matter for a volume based recipe, what size the measures are as long as they are consistently proportional throughout the set. ie if the inner measurements are the right ratio to the large measure. Then the formulation will be the right ratio and the recipe should work. Where you get into issues is if you use a one cup from one set and 1/4 cup from another where that 1/4 is really a 1/4 and one TBSP. That extra TBSP of that ingredient will be out by between 20 and 25% which can really affect the end product. At that point why measure at all LOL.

Again a larger or smaller set of cups that are a proper proportion of each other will affect the volume you get which can be a good or bad thing in some items. Like who enjoys having butter tarts being overfilled because you have just that little bit too much or cupcakes the size of a walnut because there wasn't enough filling for the dozen the recipe said to make.
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We eat brown shell eggs, and they're even smaller. It's very difficult to find jumbo brown eggs. I've only seen it once, and cost like $7 a dozen.

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