Careers

EI (Employment Insurance) discussion thread

  • Last Updated:
  • Jan 18th, 2019 10:48 am
Newbie
Dec 17, 2018
5 posts
Knowledgeable wrote:
Dec 19th, 2018 7:58 am
1 - Yes. Anytime you quit a job you have to report that, usually to the call centre. It is also asked on your weekly reports if you left any jobs for a reason other than a shortage of work (anything besides a layoff).

2 - Long as you have the number of hours and you can use all those hours they can usually start a subsequent claim, correct. Meaning all your quits and/or dismissals have been allowed on the file.

3 - It is 50 cents to the dollar deducted, but they also remove taxes. The taxes vary depending on what you selected on the application for benefits and your province. The calculation for that is very difficult for that reason. Best place to look is your my service Canada account which should list all deductions and information on your payments. The taxes are a percentage of your payment so they get adjusted depending how much you make in a given week.

4 - If you are asking the benefit rate, it's 55% of your highest earning weeks (a number of weeks called the divisor) when you reapply. As the divisor changes based on the unemployment rate at the time, this is basically impossible to figure out for the future as it might change from the current numbers.

5 - Nope, long as you can prove during an audit you were actively looking for it during the entire period you were on employment insurance regular benefits.
Great info thank you! Just a question on the first pint though. I’m not quitting and will still be working some hours. Just for vacations and if anyone calls in sick. They still consider me an employee. That’s why I wasn’t sure if I need to report it.
Deal Addict
Sep 22, 2013
1838 posts
626 upvotes
Knowledgeable wrote:
Dec 19th, 2018 7:48 am
Okay since the answers given so far are not 100% correct, I want to clarify here. Did he include this information on his application and did he get paid EI during the period he was off for the surgery? They can extend the qualifying period for periods where you were unable to work due to medical issues but ONLY if he was not paid EI during that period. When that occurs it would let him use additional hours/weeks prior to the usual cut-off date and might help him. The system will do this automatically if he included the information on his application for benefits but if not it couldn't hurt to call it in or submit the request for reconsideration with that information as it could change the calculation. Mind you this is assuming I am understanding that the surgery was in the last year and he didn't just take leave for it. If he just left for it and worked the entire year previous and is just missing hours he is probably out of luck.
With the little information that was initially given, the ‘no’ answer is actually 100% correct.
Newbie
Nov 11, 2018
24 posts
7 upvotes
OldMarriedGuy wrote:
Dec 19th, 2018 9:10 am
With the little information that was initially given, the ‘no’ answer is actually 100% correct.
If you want to ignore an entire section of the Digest of Benefits, I suppose? The initial post wasn't entirely clear on when the surgery was and it does make a difference.
Newbie
Nov 11, 2018
24 posts
7 upvotes
Elonwy137 wrote:
Dec 19th, 2018 8:04 am
Great info thank you! Just a question on the first pint though. I’m not quitting and will still be working some hours. Just for vacations and if anyone calls in sick. They still consider me an employee. That’s why I wasn’t sure if I need to report it.
That is different, yes. It had sounded like you were quitting for the other job entirely. If it is just a reduction in hours that is still considered an employee and employer relationship and shouldn't have to be reported. It is when it is separation it requires reporting it on the weekly claimant reports, though you would continue to declare the hours and earnings as normal.
Deal Fanatic
Nov 21, 2011
8371 posts
1423 upvotes
Edmonton
Knowledgeable wrote:
Dec 19th, 2018 7:58 pm
If you want to ignore an entire section of the Digest of Benefits, I suppose? The initial post wasn't entirely clear on when the surgery was and it does make a difference.
Hmmm... The post mentions he needed to stop working due to surgery, unless you ignored that?
Newbie
Nov 11, 2018
24 posts
7 upvotes
clseea wrote:
Dec 19th, 2018 11:40 pm
Hmmm... The post mentions he needed to stop working due to surgery, unless you ignored that?
I actually did. Thanks for pointing it out.
Newbie
Dec 19, 2018
1 posts
I have a question regarding continuing to work for the same company while on EI.

I've been working with a survey company that is involved with construction jobs. It has been busy during the summer and fall but I've only worked 4 days in December. I do have enough hours to qualify for benefits.

If I'm on EI, can I still work for the company, even if it's only for a day or two a week once in a while? It may not get busy again until May or June.

Thanks.
Deal Addict
Sep 22, 2013
1838 posts
626 upvotes
Terry2018 wrote:
Dec 20th, 2018 4:59 pm
I have a question regarding continuing to work for the same company while on EI.

I've been working with a survey company that is involved with construction jobs. It has been busy during the summer and fall but I've only worked 4 days in December. I do have enough hours to qualify for benefits.

If I'm on EI, can I still work for the company, even if it's only for a day or two a week once in a while? It may not get busy again until May or June.

Thanks.
Yes however you’re still required to report your hours and earnings. Half of what you earn will be deducted from your EI benefits.

Ex. earned $100 = $50 of your benefits being deducted.
Newbie
Nov 11, 2018
24 posts
7 upvotes
OldMarriedGuy wrote:
Dec 21st, 2018 7:00 am
Yes however you’re still required to report your hours and earnings. Half of what you earn will be deducted from your EI benefits.

Ex. earned $100 = $50 of your benefits being deducted.
Additionally, be seeking full-time employment and be keeping track of those efforts as they can be requested as part of an audit on your file. Inability to prove those efforts can lead to penalties and being required to pay back the benefits.
Deal Addict
Sep 22, 2013
1838 posts
626 upvotes
Knowledgeable wrote:
Dec 23rd, 2018 1:35 am
Additionally, be seeking full-time employment and be keeping track of those efforts as they can be requested as part of an audit on your file. Inability to prove those efforts can lead to penalties and being required to pay back the benefits.
....right.
Deal Addict
Jul 21, 2006
1034 posts
178 upvotes
Is there a way to lower taxes on payment and use tuition tax credits.
Deal Fanatic
Nov 21, 2011
8371 posts
1423 upvotes
Edmonton
stratux wrote:
Dec 24th, 2018 5:34 am
Is there a way to lower taxes on payment and use tuition tax credits.
What are you talking about?
Deal Addict
Jul 21, 2006
1034 posts
178 upvotes
My ei is $547-$68. Is it possible to lower taxes with tuition tax credits?

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