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EI (Employment Insurance) discussion thread

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  • Apr 7th, 2020 4:00 pm
Newbie
Nov 13, 2011
41 posts
13 upvotes
BURNABY
swordth wrote: I've been working for 3 years. My common-law partner wants to move back to our hometown, after we moved here 3 years ago for this job.
Reason #17 for just-cause leaving in EI talks about an obligation to accompany a spouse, and I was wondering if I could use that to get EI?

I've been trying to find work in my hometown for a while now, but interviews are tough to get. Employers don't want to make accommodations to hire someone from out-of-town (interviews are tough to schedule, it takes me $200 and 8 hours roundtrip to go there, I need time to move there if I'm hired, etc).

What kind of proof do I need to provide EI with to show that I tried to find reasonable alternatives?
What type of process do I go through?
What are the odds that EI will deny the claim?

Thanks
Anyone have any ideas? The alternative is also claiming an unsafe workplace - which wouldn't be false either. Just yesterday the CEO was setting a great example by swinging chainsaw at a tree, unguarded, inside the bucket of a backhoe 20feet in the air.
Newbie
Dec 3, 2015
24 posts
4 upvotes
London, ON
Tulips2 wrote: Thanks for the info. I call in and tell them that I can't come to work (it is one day at the time, once or twice a month), but I don't say that I am sick because I would be asked for a doctor's note. I say that it's for a matter that I can't disclose. On another occasion I did suggest how to make up the hours but the idea was rejected. I got a write up for the absence without providing a valid reason.
Unfortunately any adjudicator who gets wind of this will destroy you.
Newbie
Dec 3, 2015
24 posts
4 upvotes
London, ON
swordth wrote: Anyone have any ideas? The alternative is also claiming an unsafe workplace - which wouldn't be false either. Just yesterday the CEO was setting a great example by swinging chainsaw at a tree, unguarded, inside the bucket of a backhoe 20feet in the air.
Some things to consider:

- Why is your common-law partner moving back to the home town? Anything along the lines of a personal choice might raise eyebrows.
- Why must you accompany them? There is obviously the element of being in a relationship, but having kids is a big plus. Remember that the Act refers to the obligation to follow a spouse - not just a desire.
- You need to explore the options of: living apart on a temporary basis and commuting periodically; arranging for a transfer; and looking for work in the region prior to moving.

If you are currently living together but have no dependent children there will be questions about why you didn't live apart temporarily. There may also be questions about the motivations for moving in the first place. Be prepared to answer them, and this may involve providing detailed information about your finances and inability to maintain two places of residence.

Unsafe working conditions are difficult to prove. They raise credibility issues - the agent will be contacting your employer and making these allegations known, and then they will make a judgement about which person to believe. Furthermore, if you get a stickler agent they may ask uncomfortable questions about why you didn't appeal to an outside authority about your working conditions. Overall, following a partner would be the easier route...
Newbie
Dec 4, 2015
1 posts
York, ON
Hello b166er1337,

I am sorry to bother you but was wondering if you are/would be able to answer an EI question. Sorry not sure if this thread is still open. Thank you
Deal Addict
Sep 22, 2013
2203 posts
1272 upvotes
milkthistle123 wrote: Hello b166er1337,

I am sorry to bother you but was wondering if you are/would be able to answer an EI question. Sorry not sure if this thread is still open. Thank you
That's the whole purpose of this thread...ask away.
Deal Fanatic
Nov 21, 2011
9085 posts
1698 upvotes
Edmonton
batista99 wrote: My apologies if this has been answered before.

I started a new job two weeks ago and the pay period ended today but won't get paid until next Friday December 11.
Three weeks without pay is excessive and EI most likely won't pay because I worked the last 2 weeks, is that right?
Correct. Just imagine if you only got paid once a month
Deal Fanatic
Nov 21, 2011
9085 posts
1698 upvotes
Edmonton
swordth wrote: Anyone have any ideas? The alternative is also claiming an unsafe workplace - which wouldn't be false either. Just yesterday the CEO was setting a great example by swinging chainsaw at a tree, unguarded, inside the bucket of a backhoe 20feet in the air.
Just state you're financially dependent on each other
Newbie
Aug 14, 2015
18 posts
Calgary, AB
Hi, I have a couple of questions. First, I have just received a letter of termination from my employer saying my temporary lay-off is now permanent. Now that I'm terminated from work, how does this affect my EI benefits? Finally, how come it is virtually impossible to get a hold of an Employment Insurance Customer Service Representative over the phone? Thank you!
Newbie
Dec 3, 2015
24 posts
4 upvotes
London, ON
joe382 wrote: Hi, I have a couple of questions. First, I have just received a letter of termination from my employer saying my temporary lay-off is now permanent. Now that I'm terminated from work, how does this affect my EI benefits? Finally, how come it is virtually impossible to get a hold of an Employment Insurance Customer Service Representative over the phone? Thank you!
I don't think that would affect your eligibility for EI benefits. Make sure you keep filling out your reports and recording your job search. Keep a copy of the letter that your employer sent you - I have come across cases in which the employer, due to a clerical error, told an employee that their layoff was now permanent but then updated the ROE to reflect quit when they didn't "return to work" on the recall date that had been listed on the initial ROE. Better safe than sorry.

High call volume results in it being difficult to get through to a representative. Go in person to a Service Canada Centre.
Deal Addict
Sep 22, 2013
2203 posts
1272 upvotes
Ipip12 wrote: I don't think that would affect your eligibility for EI benefits. Make sure you keep filling out your reports and recording your job search. Keep a copy of the letter that your employer sent you - I have come across cases in which the employer, due to a clerical error, told an employee that their layoff was now permanent but then updated the ROE to reflect quit when they didn't "return to work" on the recall date that had been listed on the initial ROE. Better safe than sorry.

High call volume results in it being difficult to get through to a representative. Go in person to a Service Canada Centre.
Do not go in person to a Service Canada Centre!! That could be the worst thing you could possibly do. You should go there only to provide them with the letter to your employer to place on your file, that's it. You're off work, wake up early and call the hotline and wait on line. It's not impossible to get a hold of someone, you just have to have some patience. Good luck.
Sr. Member
User avatar
May 28, 2004
530 posts
232 upvotes
Wow. Just noticed this thread recently and wanted to say THANK YOU to everyone who takes their time to answer questions!
Deal Addict
Sep 22, 2013
2203 posts
1272 upvotes
amb1977 wrote: Why is that?
They have general information about Service Canada programs. They do not have in depth knowledge about any of the programs. The issue is that people demand answers immediately...so they often give wrong advice to get the client out of there (not done purposely, they just don't know any better). I have worked in EI and other Service Canada programs and some of the advice the in person CSO's have given people have cost people thousands of dollars. For example...I've seen CSOs tell people they can collect EI while on vacation (not true) in addition to telling people they could do things that would disentitle them from benefits. In non EI programs, I have seen them give out 5+ year old outdated applications for programs and completely inaccurate advice/instructions which ended up costing people a lot of money that they were not refunded.
Deal Addict
Sep 22, 2013
2203 posts
1272 upvotes
amb1977 wrote: It would be nice if the call centres had enough staffing to answer calls so that people wouldn't need to go in to a Service Canada upset and wanting answers to questions that CSOs do not have that the tools or resources to respond to.
Staffing levels are political decisions. Contact your MP and express your concern with the wait time to speak with someone at the call centre. Complaints are the only way these things will change.
Deal Fanatic
Nov 21, 2011
9085 posts
1698 upvotes
Edmonton
amb1977 wrote: It would be nice if the call centres had enough staffing to answer calls so that people wouldn't need to go in to a Service Canada upset and wanting answers to questions that CSOs do not have that the tools or resources to respond to.
Horrible jobs make it difficult to retain people, and the breadth and depth of knowledge required weed people out pretty quickly. Not to mention the awful people you get to deal with so often.
[OP]
Moderator
User avatar
Sep 21, 2004
10140 posts
4220 upvotes
Calgary
clseea wrote: Horrible jobs make it difficult to retain people, and the breadth and depth of knowledge required weed people out pretty quickly. Not to mention the awful people you get to deal with so often.
Imagine talking to claimants who are sad, angry, confused and breaking down because they don't qualify for EI and are about to be evicted. Claimants don't call you because they are happy. EI call centre is not a fun job.

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