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EI (Employment Insurance) discussion thread

  • Last Updated:
  • Sep 21st, 2017 2:17 pm
Deal Fanatic
Nov 21, 2011
7710 posts
1239 upvotes
Edmonton
samh89 wrote:
Jun 28th, 2017 9:32 pm
Hello, quick question. I will be going out of town for an extended period of time, about six weeks, during which I will be unavailable for work. My question is can I just continue to fill out my reports and put that I wasn't available for work, or should I contact Service Canada and let them know beforehand?
You should technically report the absence, but declaring unavailable will amount to the same result
Newbie
Jun 21, 2017
3 posts
Thank you for the reply! Will being unavailable affect my claim in any way? I guess I'm wondering if they will not like it and question continuing my coverage once I am back.
Deal Addict
Sep 22, 2013
1359 posts
400 upvotes
samh89 wrote:
Jun 29th, 2017 11:57 am
Thank you for the reply! Will being unavailable affect my claim in any way? I guess I'm wondering if they will not like it and question continuing my coverage once I am back.
It's easier to report you're going on vacation and then call when you get back to start doing the reports again.

If you report you're unavailable you don't get paid. To be honest no one really cares and they won't follow up with you.

There would only be a problem if you complete your reports incorrectly and the. You would have to actually call in and speak with someone.
Newbie
Dec 11, 2015
17 posts
3 upvotes
According to Service Canada they say
"We will calculate the amount of your weekly benefits based on your total earnings before deductions during the “best weeks” in your qualifying period (this includes tips and commissions). Your qualifying period is the 52-week period prior to the start date of your EI claim. Your best weeks are the weeks that you earned the most money. In regions of Canada with the highest rates of unemployment, we will calculate using the best 14 weeks; in regions of Canada with the lowest rates of unemployment, we will use the best 22 weeks. In other regions, the number of weeks used to calculate benefits will be somewhere between 14 and 22, depending on the unemployment rate in those regions"

My question is if I only worked 16 weeks but am in a region with the lowest unemployment rate do they use the 22 weeks to average earnings (even if I did not actually work that long)?

Also, on my first claim I reported $100 of earnings because I worked one day in the final week. I see that this is also on my ROE. Should I have reported it on my claim report?
Deal Addict
User avatar
Jan 31, 2006
4305 posts
397 upvotes
Toronto
Frank1955 wrote:
Jul 1st, 2017 5:24 pm
According to Service Canada they say
"We will calculate the amount of your weekly benefits based on your total earnings before deductions during the “best weeks” in your qualifying period (this includes tips and commissions). Your qualifying period is the 52-week period prior to the start date of your EI claim. Your best weeks are the weeks that you earned the most money. In regions of Canada with the highest rates of unemployment, we will calculate using the best 14 weeks; in regions of Canada with the lowest rates of unemployment, we will use the best 22 weeks. In other regions, the number of weeks used to calculate benefits will be somewhere between 14 and 22, depending on the unemployment rate in those regions"

My question is if I only worked 16 weeks but am in a region with the lowest unemployment rate do they use the 22 weeks to average earnings (even if I did not actually work that long)?

Also, on my first claim I reported $100 of earnings because I worked one day in the final week. I see that this is also on my ROE. Should I have reported it on my claim report?
No, all money appear in your ROE already reported by your employer
Newbie
Dec 11, 2015
17 posts
3 upvotes
cgtlky wrote:
Jul 2nd, 2017 7:51 am
No, all money appear in your ROE already reported by your employer
I guess that makes sense. Thanks..

Anyone have comment on the first question about how the average earnings is calculated. Doing it that way it appears that Service Canada used weeks where I had no earnings so this reduces the average weekly benefit. Do you know if that is the case clseea?
Deal Addict
Sep 22, 2013
1359 posts
400 upvotes
Frank1955 wrote:
Jul 2nd, 2017 1:42 pm
I guess that makes sense. Thanks..

Anyone have comment on the first question about how the average earnings is calculated. Doing it that way it appears that Service Canada used weeks where I had no earnings so this reduces the average weekly benefit. Do you know if that is the case clseea?
They don't calculate weeks you didn't work.
Newbie
Jul 2, 2017
1 posts
Hello, I fell into the EI once 3 years ago and I remember in the questionnaire I had to submit bi-weekly there was a question along the lines of "have you received any money other than you have already mentioned above?". Well, I am remembering this now because I might fall back in the EI within a few months. Consider this scenario: do you have to say that your roommates give you money every month or if it's not of EI business to know that? Unfortunately you share your apartment with your roommates and you are the one who signed the contract. Will the EI consider this as some sort of revenue that will impact in the amount you will receive from them? Frankly, if it will impact, you will have to get rid of your roommates or of your apartment altogether because you would not be able to afford your expenses otherwise. What do you think?
Deal Addict
Feb 24, 2008
1320 posts
181 upvotes
Mississauga
As per section 23.4.5 of the Digest, a claimant of compassionate care benefits is entitled to receive benefits outside Canada for providing care to a gravely ill family member. On the application for benefits, it asks for the address of the gravely ill family member which can be outside Canada however it doesn't ask anywhere on the application if the claimant will be leaving Canada to provide care although it is quite obvious they will as ill family member is outside Canada.

If one is exempt from completing reports, the question that arises is whether the claimant still needs to formally notify Service Canada of their absence from Canada to look after their gravely ill family member?
Newbie
Oct 24, 2012
16 posts
3 upvotes
Calgary
Another scenario I wanted to ask about:

Been with my company for around three years in a permanent role. Recently started pondering a change of role/career. An internal position came up, but the issue is that it's a 12 month term. There's a good chance it will be extended following the term, but no guarantees.

If I were to take this role, and then get laid off at the end of the 12 month term, would I be eligible for EI? My concern would be they would see the switch from permanent to term as "ineligibility".

Thanks!
Sr. Member
Mar 1, 2008
661 posts
56 upvotes
Toronto
I filled out the EI application just now since I lost my job today. My employer said they will upload the ROE electronically on Service Canada. How exactly do I access this? Do I need to create an account or some sort?
Deal Addict
Feb 24, 2008
1320 posts
181 upvotes
Mississauga
kulb wrote:
Jul 3rd, 2017 7:01 pm
As per section 23.4.5 of the Digest, a claimant of compassionate care benefits is entitled to receive benefits outside Canada for providing care to a gravely ill family member. On the application for benefits, it asks for the address of the gravely ill family member which can be outside Canada however it doesn't ask anywhere on the application if the claimant will be leaving Canada to provide care although it is quite obvious they will as ill family member is outside Canada.

If one is exempt from completing reports, the question that arises is whether the claimant still needs to formally notify Service Canada of their absence from Canada to look after their gravely ill family member?
EI experts your opinion please?
Deal Fanatic
Nov 21, 2011
7710 posts
1239 upvotes
Edmonton
Flandernss wrote:
Jul 3rd, 2017 11:56 am
Hello, I fell into the EI once 3 years ago and I remember in the questionnaire I had to submit bi-weekly there was a question along the lines of "have you received any money other than you have already mentioned above?". Well, I am remembering this now because I might fall back in the EI within a few months. Consider this scenario: do you have to say that your roommates give you money every month or if it's not of EI business to know that? Unfortunately you share your apartment with your roommates and you are the one who signed the contract. Will the EI consider this as some sort of revenue that will impact in the amount you will receive from them? Frankly, if it will impact, you will have to get rid of your roommates or of your apartment altogether because you would not be able to afford your expenses otherwise. What do you think?
You're not earning money from them so don't worry about it. It's not income

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