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EI (Employment Insurance) discussion thread

  • Last Updated:
  • Nov 19th, 2017 9:41 pm
Newbie
Oct 27, 2016
21 posts
3 upvotes
clseea wrote:
Jul 13th, 2017 2:10 am
Cool..... You're conveniently forgetting the part where I told you to appeal, several times, even though it didn't look like you had any grounds.

Breaking news, interpretations differ from person to person.
I'm not conveniently forgetting anything, including some of the nasty remarks that were (prudently) edited.

The grounds were that I did not leave voluntarily for unjust cause, and it wasn't simply a situation where I 'didn't like my job or couldn't get along with my boss', i.e. my own fault or problem. The situation was one where I functioned well within the environment I had been in for years, but I was officially 'terminated' due to a closure. Three weeks later I was offered a new job role elsewhere in the company (obviously I was valued as an employee in order for that to occur), but it was not reasonably equivalent, or within my capabilities.

I understand that some people probably try to abuse the system, but ...

The fundamental purpose of (paying into) EI is to provide a safety net, enabling people to bridge the gap when they lose THEIR JOB due to no fault of their own. As if 'change' isn't hard enough, but to deny a person coverage because they can't function in an alternative, entirely unacceptable job is an abuse of power. If this is how EI functions regularly, they should be held accountable.

I don't know if the so-called 'experts' on this forum are current, ex, or just 'wanna' be' authorities on the subject-matter, but it is not your place to 'judge' others. Your knowledge is truly appreciated, but any passive/aggressive, snide, sarcastic responses are not. Please try to be more compassionate is all I'm suggesting, because most people who come here often are struggling enough.
Newbie
Oct 27, 2016
21 posts
3 upvotes
avatar001 wrote:
Jul 12th, 2017 11:59 pm
Thank you so much for your reply. My employer gave me paper ROE yesterday. I have submit it yesterday in person at service canada office.
Any idea how long does it take from now to decision update?

Thanks
Unfortunately, it could (potentially) be weeks away yet, depending on the time of year (holidays, etc.).

IF there are no 'issues' discovered with your entitlement, the paperwork seems to go from the 'paper-gatherer clerk' to the 'bean-counter clerk', to the 'report card remission clerk' ... any of which could slow things down for one reason or another (and who don't seem to care how long you've waited already because your employer was negligent in his duties to provide a ROE. I would offer two (lay-person) suggestions:

1. Try to get the name and phone number of anyone who you have person-to-person contact with @ EI, and befriend them. With any luck, they will (at least try to) push things along in other departments, if there is some sort of hold-up.

2. Apply for welfare if you are getting desperate. EI will repay welfare by reducing your (eventual) cheques by some amount (not the entire cheque at once).
Deal Fanatic
Nov 21, 2011
7771 posts
1252 upvotes
Edmonton
WhatToDo wrote:
Jul 13th, 2017 9:26 am
I'm not conveniently forgetting anything, including some of the nasty remarks that were (prudently) edited.

The grounds were that I did not leave voluntarily for unjust cause, and it wasn't simply a situation where I 'didn't like my job or couldn't get along with my boss', i.e. my own fault or problem. The situation was one where I functioned well within the environment I had been in for years, but I was officially 'terminated' due to a closure. Three weeks later I was offered a new job role elsewhere in the company (obviously I was valued as an employee in order for that to occur), but it was not reasonably equivalent, or within my capabilities.

I understand that some people probably try to abuse the system, but ...

The fundamental purpose of (paying into) EI is to provide a safety net, enabling people to bridge the gap when they lose THEIR JOB due to no fault of their own. As if 'change' isn't hard enough, but to deny a person coverage because they can't function in an alternative, entirely unacceptable job is an abuse of power. If this is how EI functions regularly, they should be held accountable.

I don't know if the so-called 'experts' on this forum are current, ex, or just 'wanna' be' authorities on the subject-matter, but it is not your place to 'judge' others. Your knowledge is truly appreciated, but any passive/aggressive, snide, sarcastic responses are not. Please try to be more compassionate is all I'm suggesting, because most people who come here often are struggling enough.
Ah, let's call it selective memory then.
clseea wrote:
Oct 29th, 2016 4:21 pm
By all means appeal it
clseea wrote:
Oct 29th, 2016 10:58 pm
Your only hope is to appeal. Based on what grounds? No idea how you plan on approaching that but that's your call.
WhatToDo wrote:
Oct 30th, 2016 1:24 am

I guess I will study all of the provisions of the guidelines/laws, and argue that the new position offered was unsuitable.
clseea wrote:
Oct 30th, 2016 2:50 am
Sounds great
Are you done now?
Newbie
Jun 6, 2017
5 posts
WhatToDo wrote:
Jul 13th, 2017 9:59 am
Unfortunately, it could (potentially) be weeks away yet, depending on the time of year (holidays, etc.).

IF there are no 'issues' discovered with your entitlement, the paperwork seems to go from the 'paper-gatherer clerk' to the 'bean-counter clerk', to the 'report card remission clerk' ... any of which could slow things down for one reason or another (and who don't seem to care how long you've waited already because your employer was negligent in his duties to provide a ROE. I would offer two (lay-person) suggestions:

1. Try to get the name and phone number of anyone who you have person-to-person contact with @ EI, and befriend them. With any luck, they will (at least try to) push things along in other departments, if there is some sort of hold-up.

2. Apply for welfare if you are getting desperate. EI will repay welfare by reducing your (eventual) cheques by some amount (not the entire cheque at once).
Thank you so much for helping me.
Sr. Member
User avatar
Jul 11, 2011
834 posts
485 upvotes
Ontario
WhatToDo wrote:
Jul 13th, 2017 9:59 am
Unfortunately, it could (potentially) be weeks away yet, depending on the time of year (holidays, etc.).

IF there are no 'issues' discovered with your entitlement, the paperwork seems to go from the 'paper-gatherer clerk' to the 'bean-counter clerk', to the 'report card remission clerk' ... any of which could slow things down for one reason or another (and who don't seem to care how long you've waited already because your employer was negligent in his duties to provide a ROE. I would offer two (lay-person) suggestions:

1. Try to get the name and phone number of anyone who you have person-to-person contact with @ EI, and befriend them. With any luck, they will (at least try to) push things along in other departments, if there is some sort of hold-up.

2. Apply for welfare if you are getting desperate. EI will repay welfare by reducing your (eventual) cheques by some amount (not the entire cheque at once).
WTD...you're what, 19 years old, possibly 20 by now?? I do hope you find your true calling, don't just become a lifer on manipulating the gov't gravy train. Your attitude in the this thread makes me feel that a free ride is what you value the most right now.



ps...how's the job hunt been treating you?? You have had what, a good eight months of uninterrupted searching by now.
Newbie
May 15, 2017
28 posts
2 upvotes
Question pertaining to a relative:

She quit a full- time 6 month contract position in December. In January she began a permanent part-time position in January and was dismissed at the end of her probationary period because she wasn't a good fit (listed as dismissed on ROE). Between the two jobs she has over the required insurable hours.

My question is - will she qualify for EI ? Are the hours from the job she quit from fair game to use to meet the ensured hours threshold?

Thanks
Newbie
Jul 13, 2017
6 posts
Leask
seabreezes wrote:
Jul 12th, 2017 6:08 pm
Hey, I have a stupid EI question and I cannot figure out where else to turn for some advice!

I'm trying to figure out if it's worth it to me to apply for EI or not (I already submitted a claim, but I will just leave it dormant in this situation).

I work for a school board in a 10 month contract non-teaching support position (and, of course, I was temporarily laid off from July to August). My coworkers/union are encouraging me to apply for EI, apparently they all apply for EI during the summer.

However, I am sort of confused about applying for it in this situation. I'm definitely unemployed during these two months, but I'm not particularly looking for a job (I know my return to work date)... isn't that a requirement for EI? I doubt that all my coworkers are looking for jobs during these two months, so I don't get how they do it. Are they all applying to jobs and not going to interviews or whatever? Doesn't Service Canada ask for proof of job searching?

I'm not sure if I should cancel my claim or just start looking for jobs to get it. What am I doing wrong here? I feel like there's something I'm not understanding in this situation! How are all my coworkers getting EI and not looking for jobs? Just lying?

When and if you were to be called in for an EI interview, they will only ask to see your job search for two weeks. They will mail you a letter requesting a meeting from two weeks time of your receipt of that letter. That will give you plenty of time to fulfill the requirements. Remember that you don't have to apply to jobs in person. You can apply online or just phone around and ask about job prospects. If you really don't want to be given a job, you could say something along the lines of you were looking for work until the first week of September when you would have to return to work. Not many want to hire under these circumstances. Remember to get the name of whomever you have spoken with.

Also - and this is important - when you go back to work, don't say you've begun a new job as you haven't. You are still working for the same employer. Don't neglect completing your claim because you've returned to work. Keep filling out your claims...the reason being that when you go to claim for the two weeks at Christmas and time during March break, it can sometimes be many weeks to reactivate and then you won't get paid immediately. Rather, complete your weeks stating the hours you work and the pay you receive when September rolls around. Each two weeks, fill out your claim stating you've worked and this keeps the claim open. You won't collect EI or use any of your weeks worth of EI payment. However, when Christmas break occurs and you go to fill out your claim, you will be immediately paid as the claim is still considered active. Hope this makes sense.
Newbie
Jul 11, 2017
3 posts
Thanks for the advice, I might not bother with my claim for this summer. I'm going on a two week vacation in a few weeks, anyway, so I don't want to add THAT to the EI equation. I feel so dumb about this!!
Newbie
Oct 27, 2016
21 posts
3 upvotes
hebsie wrote:
Jul 13th, 2017 6:48 pm
WTD...you're what, 19 years old, possibly 20 by now?? I do hope you find your true calling, don't just become a lifer on manipulating the gov't gravy train. Your attitude in the this thread makes me feel that a free ride is what you value the most right now.

ps...how's the job hunt been treating you?? You have had what, a good eight months of uninterrupted searching by now.
These comments do not appear to be written in an effort to be helpful.

Not having income for any amount of time can mean the difference between eating, or not. Either way, Avatar001 would not have asked for advice on how to speed up the process, if s/he wasn’t looking to obtain the payment as early as possible. Since s/he had been waiting weeks for the employer to meet their obligation to remit the ROE, and may wait several more weeks before the claim might be paid out, what suggestions could others offer to someone who finds themselves in a desperate situation in the meantime?

Are there many mortgage holder's (or landlords, or grocers, or other creditors) that would say ‘we understand that (for many various reasons) getting a timely payment might be difficult … so just take whatever you need in the meantime'’? Some people don’t even have family to lean on when times get difficult, but that does not mean their objective is to just get a ‘free ride’ in life.

How would I even afford a bus ride to look for a job if I had really been out of work for 8 mo? There are a series of time-consuming steps, including: an initial assessment, a review, an appeal and finally the tribunal remittance, all of which can take many months to 1 year +. The back-pay for the judgement is only for a few months of non-voluntary unemployment, but it will be a huge relief for me to be able to clear up the debts I accumulated over that difficult period.

My ‘true calling’ was to remain gainfully employed in a company that treats their employees (at least) semi-decently. I landed a great job, with amazing bosses, and have since gotten a promotion. I have achieved more than I could have dreamed of during those darkest days, and I am very appreciative, humbled, and thankful for that. Most importantly, I have recovered from the entire experience.

As I said previously, the purpose of EI is to help bridge the gap when someone has lost THEIR job, through no fault of their own. I absolutely agree that no one should intend to abuse that societal safety net, but neither should the system be inefficient, rigid, and unsupportive in helping people to get back on their feet.

People come here for help, not judgement.
Last edited by WhatToDo on Jul 16th, 2017 11:34 am, edited 1 time in total.
Newbie
Oct 27, 2016
21 posts
3 upvotes
turtler wrote:
Jul 13th, 2017 8:32 pm
Question pertaining to a relative:

She quit a full- time 6 month contract position in December. In January she began a permanent part-time position in January and was dismissed at the end of her probationary period because she wasn't a good fit (listed as dismissed on ROE). Between the two jobs she has over the required insurable hours.

My question is - will she qualify for EI ? Are the hours from the job she quit from fair game to use to meet the ensured hours threshold?

Thanks
I really don't know the answer to your question, but since no one else has responded over the last few days), I will attempt a stab at asking some (rhetoric) questions that might help you to hedge her bets ....

They might look at all the circumstances, including questioning why she quit the 6 mo contract position (and how long into the contract?).

It would seem that EI might view a 'permanent' job to be preferential over a 'contract' position, but given the timing of everything, it doesn't seem she quit (in Dec) in order to accept the permanent job (in Jan) anyway ...?

I know that if a person voluntarily leaves/quits, without just cause, they won't pay out. That she didn't leave this last position voluntarily might work in her favor, but that might depend on the full reasons for her dismissal too, because:

EI doesn't pay out for 'dismissal for just cause' either. Only she might know (the full story) about whether the employer had 'just cause' for letting her go, eg. was it a situation where she can prove that THEY were being unreasonable in their expectations, or was it that she was perceived as unreliable or with a bad attitude? I would think EI might contact that employer to find out the exact reason she wasn't a 'good fit', and if it appears to them to be 'just cause' they likely wouldn't pay out.

... Those are just some (lay-person) things for her to consider.
Newbie
May 15, 2017
28 posts
2 upvotes
Does anyone have any accurate insight? Do insurable hours from past employment in which she quit count toward her recent application (after she was dismissed at her most current job without cause at the end of her probation).
Deal Addict
Sep 22, 2013
1423 posts
429 upvotes
turtler wrote:
Jul 16th, 2017 1:03 pm
Does anyone have any accurate insight? Do insurable hours from past employment in which she quit count toward her recent application (after she was dismissed at her most current job without cause at the end of her probation).
If she quit the contract job to accept the new job for which she felt would be permanent and lead to a full time position then potentially those hours would be useable. If she was let go in her new position due to no fault of her own (such as being a wrong fit) then those hours would be useable as well.

If she quit the contact position for other reasons that aren't considered an acceptable reasons then those hours would be disqualified from her claim.
Newbie
May 15, 2017
28 posts
2 upvotes
OldMarriedGuy wrote:
Jul 16th, 2017 1:48 pm
If she quit the contract job to accept the new job for which she felt would be permanent and lead to a full time position then potentially those hours would be useable. If she was let go in her new position due to no fault of her own (such as being a wrong fit) then those hours would be useable as well.

If she quit the contact position for other reasons that aren't considered an acceptable reasons then those hours would be disqualified from her claim.
What is considered an acceptable reason to quit? What is considered an unacceptable reason to quit?
Deal Addict
Sep 22, 2013
1423 posts
429 upvotes
turtler wrote:
Jul 16th, 2017 2:01 pm
What is considered an acceptable reason to quit? What is considered an unacceptable reason to quit?
The reasons listed below could be considered just cause for leaving your job voluntarily:

quitting to start a new job
accompanying your spouse or dependent child to live in another city
your employer asks you to engage in illegal practices
being a victim of sexual or other harassment
being forced to work under conditions that are dangerous to your health and safety
being a victim of discrimination based on your race, gender, sexual orientation, age, physical conditions, disability, etc. at your workplace
your employer owes you wages or refuses to pay you overtime pay or you are asked to work an excessive amount of overtime
you were given undue pressure by your employer or co-workers to resign
your wages have been greatly reduced, or your working conditions and position have changed significantly
you were subjected to unreasonably harsh or unfair treatment from your supervisor
you cannot continue working or doing a similar type of work because of health reasons
you need to care for a child or a member of your immediate family (However, you cannot receive employment insurance benefits while taking care for your family member because you need to be able and willing to find work in order to be eligible for benefits).

Even though the above reasons are considered just cause for leaving your employment, you will not automatically be eligible for regular employment insurance benefits. You will still be required to prove that you took measures to resolve the problems and quitting was the last and only option. For example, if you could not continue to work because of health reasons, you must show that you provided your employer with a doctor’s note and asked for a job transfer. If the employer refused to make the necessary arrangements and you have no choice but to resign, you would have just cause for quitting and be eligible for regular EI benefit.

If you became unemployed due to your personal negligence or misconduct, you are not eligible to receive employment insurance benefits. Examples of misconduct are :

Intentionally damaging company property
Lateness or being absent without permission
Becoming intoxicated during work hours
Not complying with supervisor’s instructions

If you were dismissed, but were not provided with a clear reason, or you think the dismissal was not for just cause, you should file a claim for EI benefits and provide your side of the story. If your application is turned down, you may seek legal advice and file an appeal.

If you lost your job due to your own fault or you voluntarily left your employment without just cause, the consequences are quite severe. You may be ineligible to get regular benefits and the hours of work you have accumulated from this job and from prior jobs will be deemed void for regular EI purposes. For example, you’ve accumulated the required hours of work by working at 3 separate jobs but if you were found not to have just cause for leaving any one of those jobs, all your accumulated hours before you quit your job with no just cause would become void. If there are problems at the workplace, you should seek legal advice before deciding to resign.

If you were dismissed or voluntarily resigned from your job, you have to explain the reason for your dismissal or resignation. This information will be used by the EI Office to investigate and to decide your eligibility.

If you resigned voluntarily, you must explain:

the reason for your resignation
what measures you took to resolve the problems prior to resigning
whether you searched for other jobs before resigning
If you were dismissed, you must explain:

the reason for your dismissal
whether the employer provided you with a warning beforehand
how you attempted to improve the situation

After you submit this information, Service Canada may contact you to conduct a telephone or in-person interview. They may also contact your employer to inquire about the situation and then decide whether there was just cause for your resignation or whether the dismissal was due to your wrongdoing. If your application is refused, you will receive a notification letter explaining the reason for the refusal. You may appeal this decision within 30 days of receiving the decision letter to the Board of Referees. This deadline is very important. You may seek help from a community agency or your local community legal clinic with the appeal.

If your application for regular EI benefits is refused based on reasons relating to losing your job, you may still use your accumulated insurable hours to apply for special employment insurance benefits including sickness, maternity, parental or compassionate care benefits. Your reason for unemployment will not affect your eligibility to apply for special employment insurance benefits.
Newbie
Oct 27, 2016
21 posts
3 upvotes
turtler wrote:
Jul 16th, 2017 2:01 pm
What is considered an acceptable reason to quit? What is considered an unacceptable reason to quit?
Here is the gov/EI page that provides acceptable reasons, and what is required before someone resorts to quitting: https://www.canada.ca/en/employment-soc ... t-job.html

She would (generally) have to provide evidence of her efforts to stay gainfully employed in the contract (see explanations in the link), and full justification for her actions though, eg. proof of the 'harassment' (or 'discrimination' or whatever). And then, even if she thinks she can provide that, they still might initially disqualify her (based on *someones* subjective opinion) ...

There is an appeal process (for whatever their decisions), but that is a long and stressful journey (see my prior post) too.

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