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EI (Employment Insurance) discussion thread

  • Last Updated:
  • Dec 15th, 2017 1:46 am
Deal Addict
Sep 22, 2013
1460 posts
448 upvotes
Hook52 wrote:
Sep 17th, 2017 6:39 am
Hello.

I had been working full time as a recent graduate on post graduation work permit for 16 months and after my contract ended because the project finished, I returned to my own country and stayed there for 6 months to do my permanent residency application. Then I returned to Canada 3 months ago and started looking for a job.

During all this time I didn't even know Employment Insurance existed. Is it still any chance I can claim EI while I am looking for a job?

Thanks
You can apply but you claim would start as of September of 2017 as you didn't apply within 4 weeks of losing your job (without a valid work permit you wouldn't be eligible for work and would then not be eligible for benefits).

A claim would be allowed if you have enough hours in the qualifying period (52 weeks before the claim). As you have only worked 3 months out of the last year, you wouldn't have enough hours to be eligible so your claim wouldn't be approved anyways.

You can always apply and find out for yourself however...
Deal Fanatic
Nov 21, 2011
7818 posts
1255 upvotes
Edmonton
Hook52 wrote:
Sep 17th, 2017 6:39 am
Hello.

I had been working full time as a recent graduate on post graduation work permit for 16 months and after my contract ended because the project finished, I returned to my own country and stayed there for 6 months to do my permanent residency application. Then I returned to Canada 3 months ago and started looking for a job.

During all this time I didn't even know Employment Insurance existed. Is it still any chance I can claim EI while I am looking for a job?

Thanks
Are you legally allowed to work now? If not, you can't get EI. If yes, apply. You probably won't have enough hours at this point though if it's been 9 months since you worked
Newbie
Sep 16, 2017
2 posts
OldMarriedGuy wrote:
Sep 17th, 2017 10:53 pm
You can apply but you claim would start as of September of 2017 as you didn't apply within 4 weeks of losing your job (without a valid work permit you wouldn't be eligible for work and would then not be eligible for benefits).

A claim would be allowed if you have enough hours in the qualifying period (52 weeks before the claim). As you have only worked 3 months out of the last year, you wouldn't have enough hours to be eligible so your claim wouldn't be approved anyways.

You can always apply and find out for yourself however...
Thanks for the info.

I've had a valid work permit during all this time.

I read there is an exception which allows them to consider the past 104 weeks. Does that perhaps apply to my case?

I am wondering if I should just start a part time job as I am running out of my savings and am not sure if I can wait for them to review my case. Do you perhaps know How long does it usually take them to make a decision?

Thanks
Deal Addict
Apr 18, 2010
4312 posts
348 upvotes
Toronto
Is there a maximum amount of hours you can work during a reporting week before you are no longer entitled to payment? I'm working part-time and my hours in a week may go as high as 30+ hours.
Deal Fanatic
Nov 21, 2011
7818 posts
1255 upvotes
Edmonton
glover78 wrote:
Sep 21st, 2017 12:46 am
Is there a maximum amount of hours you can work during a reporting week before you are no longer entitled to payment? I'm working part-time and my hours in a week may go as high as 30+ hours.
35 or more hours will be deemed a full work week so you won't receive any benefits regardless of your earnings
Deal Fanatic
Nov 21, 2011
7818 posts
1255 upvotes
Edmonton
Hook52 wrote:
Sep 18th, 2017 9:40 am
Thanks for the info.

I've had a valid work permit during all this time.

I read there is an exception which allows them to consider the past 104 weeks. Does that perhaps apply to my case?

I am wondering if I should just start a part time job as I am running out of my savings and am not sure if I can wait for them to review my case. Do you perhaps know How long does it usually take them to make a decision?

Thanks
You wouldn't qualify for an extended qualifying period. Not being legally allowed to work can't get you an extension
Newbie
Sep 19, 2017
8 posts
Hello, this is my first time applying for EI and unfortunately the experience proves to be a lot rougher than I expected. I appreciate any assistance in clarifying some questions I have. First, a little history.

My EI was approved sometime mid-Jan of this year after the company I worked for 4 years gave me the lay off. Originally I know that there was a one week waiting period, what I didn't know was that this period only starts after my severance ran out (sometime in mid-Feb) Even worst when I found out that it only starts when you do the online report and say Yes when asked if you are willing and capable of looking for work (which I didn't do until July) I remember years ago at a previous workplace a co-worker was telling me about how he was collecting EI for a year, and that he just stayed at home and didn't look for work. This gave me the wrong impression that you'll get EI payment as long as you're approved. Currently I'm working at a logistic company, and although my status is temporary I am working the full 40 hrs/W, which is 5 hrs more than the minimum required 35 to be eligible for EI. So now the only time I can get any EI payment is during one of the few statuary holidays in Canada when the work week is shortened to 4 days. Unbelievable.

Anyway, here's my questions.

1. I hear the two ways a EI claim can end is when either the number of weeks ends or the total insurable amount is all used up. The weeks will eventually comes to an end anyway, but I don't see how the insurable amount can be used up. In fact I took the insurable amount and divided by the weekly rate, and it happens to equal the exact number of weeks. It might just be a coincidence. Even so, I calculated that at the rate I'm getting the fewer payment there is, I might only be getting a little under 50% of the total after all the weeks are up. Which leads to my next question.

2. Say you have 8 weeks remain and you still got 5k of insurable amount next, but realistically you can only get about half of that. Is EI perfectly content to give you the regular amount, rather to increase it so you can get as much of it as you can before time runs out?

3. Perhaps my biggest question. I been to a EI seminar once and people were submitting their job search form, if I recall it had questions like
Where did you go for the job interview, what position were you offered, did you accept, why or why not. That last two questions gave me the impression that you're suppose to accept the first job offer that's within your ability to do, no matter how menial or unskilled they may be. (E.g. A Doctor can do unskilled labour work at an assembly line just like anyone else, but that's hardly putting his skills to good use) Which begs the question: If I could find the first easy to do job a short time after my layoff, then what is the point of EI in the first place? How can anyone collect anything if they're expected to take the first job offered even if it doesn't corresponds to their profession?

4. I heard EI is actually something you're paying into, something I didn't really notice on my pay stub but it was there all along. This means that the EI money is essentially yours! Putting aside the fact that it's very frustrating to have someone hold onto your own money and tell you to jump through hoops just to get it, it is said that any remaining insurable amount after the number of weeks ends doesn't carry over to the next claim. What happens to that money? thrown out, taken into the government's pocket?

Please point out any incorrect facts and any tips/advices is appreciated. Thank you for your time.
Deal Addict
Apr 18, 2010
4312 posts
348 upvotes
Toronto
clseea wrote:
Sep 21st, 2017 2:06 am
35 or more hours will be deemed a full work week so you won't receive any benefits regardless of your earnings
Thanks!

Phew... dodged a bullet last week since I worked 32.5 hours.
Deal Addict
Nov 2, 2013
4863 posts
937 upvotes
Edmonton, AB
(1) Would I be eligible for EI if I incurred business use and hence expense of a vehicle during that period of time?
i.e. Would this be classified as "self employed" and "doing work to be paid at a later date"? If I were to actually incur earnings for such vehicle use, the earnings would be incurred later at a time that I am not even receiving EI, as I'd then be actively receiving income by then.

(2) In the ROE, it lists the wages paid for each pay period. Does EI match this to your weekly reports individually, or are they just more concerned about the total gross income from each employer and employment start and end dates?
I for part of the year work at an employer with volatile earnings, where they aren't exactly known until the paystubs come.
Deal Fanatic
Nov 21, 2011
7818 posts
1255 upvotes
Edmonton
VicViperMk2 wrote:
Sep 21st, 2017 10:26 am
Hello, this is my first time applying for EI and unfortunately the experience proves to be a lot rougher than I expected. I appreciate any assistance in clarifying some questions I have. First, a little history.

My EI was approved sometime mid-Jan of this year after the company I worked for 4 years gave me the lay off. Originally I know that there was a one week waiting period, what I didn't know was that this period only starts after my severance ran out (sometime in mid-Feb) Even worst when I found out that it only starts when you do the online report and say Yes when asked if you are willing and capable of looking for work (which I didn't do until July) I remember years ago at a previous workplace a co-worker was telling me about how he was collecting EI for a year, and that he just stayed at home and didn't look for work. This gave me the wrong impression that you'll get EI payment as long as you're approved. Currently I'm working at a logistic company, and although my status is temporary I am working the full 40 hrs/W, which is 5 hrs more than the minimum required 35 to be eligible for EI. So now the only time I can get any EI payment is during one of the few statuary holidays in Canada when the work week is shortened to 4 days. Unbelievable.

Anyway, here's my questions.

1. I hear the two ways a EI claim can end is when either the number of weeks ends or the total insurable amount is all used up. The weeks will eventually comes to an end anyway, but I don't see how the insurable amount can be used up. In fact I took the insurable amount and divided by the weekly rate, and it happens to equal the exact number of weeks. It might just be a coincidence. Even so, I calculated that at the rate I'm getting the fewer payment there is, I might only be getting a little under 50% of the total after all the weeks are up. Which leads to my next question.

2. Say you have 8 weeks remain and you still got 5k of insurable amount next, but realistically you can only get about half of that. Is EI perfectly content to give you the regular amount, rather to increase it so you can get as much of it as you can before time runs out?

3. Perhaps my biggest question. I been to a EI seminar once and people were submitting their job search form, if I recall it had questions like
Where did you go for the job interview, what position were you offered, did you accept, why or why not. That last two questions gave me the impression that you're suppose to accept the first job offer that's within your ability to do, no matter how menial or unskilled they may be. (E.g. A Doctor can do unskilled labour work at an assembly line just like anyone else, but that's hardly putting his skills to good use) Which begs the question: If I could find the first easy to do job a short time after my layoff, then what is the point of EI in the first place? How can anyone collect anything if they're expected to take the first job offered even if it doesn't corresponds to their profession?

4. I heard EI is actually something you're paying into, something I didn't really notice on my pay stub but it was there all along. This means that the EI money is essentially yours! Putting aside the fact that it's very frustrating to have someone hold onto your own money and tell you to jump through hoops just to get it, it is said that any remaining insurable amount after the number of weeks ends doesn't carry over to the next claim. What happens to that money? thrown out, taken into the government's pocket?

Please point out any incorrect facts and any tips/advices is appreciated. Thank you for your time.
1. Your claim ends when you use your weeks or your benefit period ends.

2. There's no pool of money. It's weeks of entitlement.

3. They're not expected to take the first job available

4. Do you expect to sit on your ass and do nothing for the money? You pay about $900 a year and can get upwards of $25000 in a years worth of claim. Pretty good return I'd say. Not sure what you're talking about.
Last edited by clseea on Sep 21st, 2017 1:37 pm, edited 1 time in total.
Newbie
Sep 19, 2017
8 posts
Thank you for the clarification on #1-4. For #3 I was under the impression that if one were to constantly show EI that they were being offered jobs but choose to not accept them that EI would refuse payment, especially if one can do the job or it's a profession with lots of openings.

Two other questions came to mind just now.

1. The required hours to qualify was around 900 something (a little over 6 months) I heard this is only for first timer, every subsequent claim requires a lot less (600 something from what I hear) But I've also heard this was the old requirement and now it is fixed at 900. Can anyone confirm?

2. Even if you has enough hours, does it impact your chance of EI approval if your employer choose not to give you layoff instead of dismissal. I ask because in the past I've worked for companies for that long, even though they were only using temporary workers like me to get through the holiday rush, they dismissed me at the end with some trivial fault as an excuse. If this applies, it'll be just that much harder to apply for EI in the end.
Member
User avatar
Oct 3, 2008
354 posts
108 upvotes
Canada
Does anyone know how it works for seasonal work and EI for the claim while working pilot project. My situation is I am on EI and have found work that is seasonal in nature and sporadic hours (instructor pilot). There are a couple issues. The main one being does duty time count as paid hours to EI? I only get paid for the hours I fly. For instance, if I am at work for 12 hours and fly 3 hours in a day I get paid for 3 hours but have a duty time of 12 hours. When I get my paycheck, pay is shown only as flight hours. Duty hours are only calculated for rest periods. So would EI see this as full time or part time if I get laid off again?

Also when submitting my online report to get a claim while working should I put duty hours or flight hours? If i report duty hours it would be upwards of 60-80 hours a week(during a busy week) but in reality i'm paid for far less than that. I normally put in about 20 hours a week of flight time during a busy week or much less when the weather is bad.

Also I get an incentive bonus for working over 40 hours of flight time a month. Basically I get an extra pay rate multiplied for those 40 hours I worked in the previous month but it is paid the next paycheck after the month is over. So I wont really know if I will get this bonus until the end of the month. How do I report this pay for online reporting?

Basically how does EI work for pilots for putting in a claim when laid off or claiming while working?
Deal Addict
Sep 22, 2013
1460 posts
448 upvotes
GRANDISON wrote:
Sep 24th, 2017 12:07 pm
Does anyone know how it works for seasonal work and EI for the claim while working pilot project. My situation is I am on EI and have found work that is seasonal in nature and sporadic hours (instructor pilot). There are a couple issues. The main one being does duty time count as paid hours to EI? I only get paid for the hours I fly. For instance, if I am at work for 12 hours and fly 3 hours in a day I get paid for 3 hours but have a duty time of 12 hours. When I get my paycheck, pay is shown only as flight hours. Duty hours are only calculated for rest periods. So would EI see this as full time or part time if I get laid off again?

Also when submitting my online report to get a claim while working should I put duty hours or flight hours? If i report duty hours it would be upwards of 60-80 hours a week(during a busy week) but in reality i'm paid for far less than that. I normally put in about 20 hours a week of flight time during a busy week or much less when the weather is bad.

Also I get an incentive bonus for working over 40 hours of flight time a month. Basically I get an extra pay rate multiplied for those 40 hours I worked in the previous month but it is paid the next paycheck after the month is over. So I wont really know if I will get this bonus until the end of the month. How do I report this pay for online reporting?

Basically how does EI work for pilots for putting in a claim when laid off or claiming while working?
On your reports you need to indicate hours and earnings paid for. If you are getting paid for ten hours, you indicate ten hours and what you're paid.

If you have other earnings from employment you report them when you receive them if you aren't paid for them the week you're working. It would be hard to report earnings if you don't know what you're making.

You would need to declare these when you revive then however you may need to call the call Centre to clarify what these earnings are from.

If you're laid off and you have weeks remaining in your claim you need to report you were laid off. If you aren't being given a ROE because you just don't have work available but may in the future just continue to complete your reports as normal.

If you don't have weeks of entitlement you have to re-apply to start a new claim.
Newbie
Jan 18, 2013
6 posts
Hello. I work for a seasonal work company and the season is a few weeks from the end but my hours have been substantially reduced already. I have not been laid off yet. I understand that I can apply for EI after 7 conecutive days of no work or earnings. I just went 6 consecutive days with no work followed by one day of work and I was already told I am not working tomorrow on a nice weather for working day. I think I am being strung along by my company in case they get short-staffed later. I don't really want to demand an ROE yet in case I get fired immediately and implicitly not invited back next year. What are my options if I have again another 5 or 6 days off followed by a single day of work? Am I still not permitted to apply for EI unless I am laid off?
Deal Fanatic
Nov 21, 2011
7818 posts
1255 upvotes
Edmonton
Kuya101 wrote:
Sep 24th, 2017 11:25 pm
Hello. I work for a seasonal work company and the season is a few weeks from the end but my hours have been substantially reduced already. I have not been laid off yet. I understand that I can apply for EI after 7 conecutive days of no work or earnings. I just went 6 consecutive days with no work followed by one day of work and I was already told I am not working tomorrow on a nice weather for working day. I think I am being strung along by my company in case they get short-staffed later. I don't really want to demand an ROE yet in case I get fired immediately and implicitly not invited back next year. What are my options if I have again another 5 or 6 days off followed by a single day of work? Am I still not permitted to apply for EI unless I am laid off?
You haven't experienced an interruption of earnings until you hit 7 consecutive days so you can't really do anything.

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