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EI Reporting and Job

  • Last Updated:
  • Aug 21st, 2009 7:31 pm
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Newbie
User avatar
Jun 27, 2009
59 posts

EI Reporting and Job

So what happens if I find a job?

When I report it on my EI report do I stop receiving EI benefits or is the EI money deducted?
7 replies
Member
Jun 5, 2008
268 posts
Toronto
MechITM wrote:
Aug 9th, 2009 7:46 am
So what happens if I find a job?

When I report it on my EI report do I stop receiving EI benefits or is the EI money deducted?
Wow is there every a lot of EI questions on the job board these days.

You should check the EI government website for your question.
Deal Addict
Mar 14, 2004
2466 posts
134 upvotes
North Etobicoke
MechITM wrote:
Aug 9th, 2009 7:46 am
So what happens if I find a job?

When I report it on my EI report do I stop receiving EI benefits or is the EI money deducted?
Just keep filling out the report until you are sure about the job (fulltime) and answer the questions accordingly.
Sr. Member
Jun 10, 2008
919 posts
77 upvotes
Any idea how unpaid/volunteer work affects EI benefits? I am guessing ideally it shouldn't affect but I am curious as to why one of their questions in their bi-weekly report is "Did you work or receive any earnings during the period of this report? This includes work for which you will be paid later, unpaid work or self-employment."

My wife is getting EI and started doing an unpaid internship last week. How does answering yes to the above question affect current benefits?
Deal Addict
Sep 22, 2007
4599 posts
116 upvotes
http://www.hrsdc.gc.ca/eng/corporate/fa ... ance.shtml
Volunteering and EI Benefits
[TOP]

Issue

Can you volunteer and still be entitled to receive Employment Insurance (EI) benefits?

There is a misconception that Canadians who volunteer are not entitled to receive EI benefits.

Fact

Yes, you can do some volunteer work and still receive Employment Insurance benefits.

How does the EI program work?

The EI program pays you regular benefits if you lose your job through no fault of your own-for example, because of a shortage of work or a seasonal or mass lay-off-and you are available for and willing to work but you cannot find a job.

To be eligible for regular EI benefits, you must show that:

* you have been without work and without pay for at least seven consecutive days; and
* during the last 52 weeks or since your last claim, you have worked for the required number of insurable hours. This minimum number of hours is based on where you live and the unemployment rate in your region at the time you file your claim for benefits.

While claiming regular benefits, you must be available and willing to work, and you must be actively looking for work. Being available for work means you are willing to accept an offer of employment to which you are suited by skill, training, aptitude, or experience, and that you are willing to accept such an offer of employment for which there is a demand in the labour market. Being available for work involves more than waiting passively for a job offer-it also means acting in a way that reflects a sincere desire to work, and that clearly shows you have been unable to find a job.
What are the rules on volunteering?

Performing volunteer work does not mean you are no longer entitled to receive EI benefits. As long as individuals are still available for and actively looking for work every day, they remain eligible for EI.

For the purposes of the EI program, we consider volunteer services to be work performed for which you receive no pay, and for which you do not derive or hope to derive any benefit, profit, or financial or economic advantage.

For more information on the Employment Insurance program, please visit servicecanada.gc.ca/eng/sc/ei/index.shtml.
www.google.ca It's your friend.
Sr. Member
Jun 10, 2008
919 posts
77 upvotes
Tell you what.... my wife reported her volunteer work in the EI report this week and now its been put on hold all together although she is still looking for work and available to join any paid opportunity right away. So its totally not worth answering "yes" to the following question in your EI report for any sort of volunteer work... "Did you work or receive any earnings during the period of this report? This includes work for which you will be paid later, unpaid work or self-employment."
Deal Fanatic
User avatar
Feb 6, 2004
6078 posts
250 upvotes
Toronto
You almost nailed this question, the issue of volunteering calls into question ones availability. So EI legislation defines working and being paid for work as different situations. For example, if you do work for a buddy, and they pay you cash, you are expected to report those earnings for the week you earned the cash. If you did some work for a buddy 12+ months ago, and they pay years later while you are receiving EI, you technically earned that money before you were on EI so it doens't have to be reported.

So if you are volunteering 40+ hours each week, how much time do you have to devote to actively looking for work? Excessive volunteer hours could cost you a reduction in benefits even tho you aren't paid.

Hope this clarified things...
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