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EMERGENCY: PROTECT your dog / pet from HOT SUN & HOT HEAT weather

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Apr 15, 2010
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EMERGENCY: PROTECT your dog / pet from HOT SUN & HOT HEAT weather

Dogs or pets are very sensitive to the heat of the hot sun
and hot like an oven temperature weather
-
Be sure to keep your dog or pets in a cool house
preferably air conditioned home or use a fan
- the BASEMENT always feels cool

Stay in the shade

Stay inside your home
- AVOID GOING OUTSIDE (especially old or sick dogs)
- buy potty pads for dogs at pet store, Walmart

Always encourage your dog to drink water

Cool water & cool air can save your dog's life

Let your dog stand in a pan or tub of cool water
- don't need much cool water
- the cool water will probably help his paw pads feel cool & moist

Please take the time to learn more about heat stroke, dehydration:

Please take the time to watch this video.

Dog panting heavily or fast, they seem agitated or excited.
Dog probably feels very hot and needs shade, air conditioning, fan, water to drink.
Dog can stand in cool water or go to basement where it is usually cool (not hot).

Go to animal doctor if dog or pet doesn't improve.



-
http://www.medicinenet.com/pets/dog-hea ... n_dogs.htm

http://dogs.about.com/od/veterinarycare ... allvet.htm

http://animals.howstuffworks.com/pets/m ... gs-ga3.htm

Always research on the internet or see a vet if your dog seems to have a health problem
or behaving strangely, abnormally

It is better to leave the dog at home on a hot day

If you are outside at an outdoor event,
it might be too hot or sunny for the dog to be outside
the dog will pant

if he starts to breathe or pant really fast, the dog is too hot
you have to go inside- preferably air conditioned building
give the dog water

bring him home to recover from the heat
- hopefully, he will be okay

if it's more serious
(the dog is breathing or panting extremely fast
and sounds like he is in pain or in agony),
you'll have to bring him to a vet or he could die

also, if it is very hot outside (feels like an oven)
- the backyard can be a dangerous place for your dog
- especially if your dog is not feeling well (sick) or if your dog is old

- you should not leave your dog alone in the backyard if it's a very hot day

Please take the time to click on this link:

http://www.medicinenet.com/pets/dog-hea ... n_dogs.htm

Heat stroke is an emergency and requires immediate treatment.

Because dogs do not sweat (except to a minor degree through their foot pads), they do not tolerate high environmental temperatures as well as humans do.

Dogs depend upon panting to exchange warm air for cool air. But when air temperature is close to body temperature, cooling by panting is not an efficient process.

Common situations that can set the stage for heat stroke in dogs include:
Being left in a car in hot weather
Exercising strenuously in hot, humid weather
Being a brachycephalic breed, especially a Bulldog, Pug, or Pekingese
Suffering from a heart or lung disease that interferes with efficient breathing
Being muzzled while put under a hair dryer
Suffering from a high fever or seizures
Being confined on concrete or asphalt surfaces
Being confined without shade and fresh water in hot weather
Having a history of heat stroke


Heat stroke begins with heavy panting and difficulty breathing.

The tongue and mucous membranes appear bright red. The saliva is thick and tenacious, and the dog often vomits.
The rectal temperature rises to 104° to 110°F (40° to 43.3°C).
The dog becomes progressively unsteady and passes bloody diarrhea.

As shock sets in, the lips and mucous membranes turn gray. Collapse, seizures, coma, and death rapidly ensue.

Treatment: Emergency measures to cool the dog must begin at once.

Move the dog out of the source of heat, preferably into an air-conditioned building.
Take his rectal temperature every 10 minutes.
Mild cases may be resolved by moving the dog into a cool environment.

If the rectal temperature is above 104°F, begin rapid cooling by spraying the dog with a garden hose or immersing him in a tub of cool water (not ice water) for up to two minutes.

Alternatively, place the wet dog in front of an electric fan.
Cool packs applied to the groin area may be helpful, as well as wiping his paws off with cool water.
Monitor his rectal temperature and continue the cooling process until the rectal temperature falls below 103°F (39°C).
At this point, stop the cooling process and dry the dog.
Further cooling may induce hypothermia and shock.

Following an episode of heat stroke, take your dog to a veterinarian as soon as possible.
Heat stroke can be associated with laryngeal edema.
This seriously worsens the breathing problem and may require an emergency tracheostomy.
An injection of cortisone before the onset of respiratory distress may prevent this problem.

Other consequences of hyperthermia include kidney failure, spontaneous bleeding, irregular heartbeat, and seizures.
These complications can occur hours or days later.

Dehydration

Dehydration occurs when a dog loses body fluids faster than he can replace them. Dehydration usually involves the loss of both water and electrolytes. In dogs, the most common causes of dehydration are severe vomiting and diarrhea. Dehydration can also be caused by inadequate fluid intake, often associated with fever and severe illness. A rapid loss of fluids also occurs with heat stroke.

A prominent sign of dehydration is loss of skin elasticity. When the skin along the back is pulled up, it should spring back into place. In a dehydrated animal, the skin stays up in a ridge.

Another sign of dehydration is dryness of the mouth. The gums, which should be wet and glistening, become dry and tacky. The saliva is thick and tenacious. In an advanced case, the eyes are sunken and the dog exhibits signs of shock, including collapse.

Treatment: A dog who is visibly dehydrated should receive immediate veterinary attention, including intravenous fluids, to replace fluids and prevent further loss.

For mild dehydration, if the dog is not vomiting you can give him an electrolyte solution by bottle or syringe into the cheek pouch. Balanced electrolyte solutions for treating dehydration in children, such as Ringer's lactate with 5 percent dextrose in water or Pedialyte solution, are available at drugstores and are also suitable for dogs. Gatorade is another short-term substitute to help replace fluids. Administer the solution at a rate of 2 to 4 ml per pound (1 to 2 ml per kilo) of body weight per hour, depending on the severity of the dehydration (or as directed by your veterinarian).

This article is excerpted from “Dog Owner’s Home Veterinary Handbook” with permission from Wiley Publishing, Inc.
http://www.wiley.com/WileyCDA/WileyTitl ... 67853.html
Copyright © 2007 by Howell Book House. All rights reserved.

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PROTECT your pet from HOT SUN/HEAT. Dogs can die of heat stroke/dehydration=panting, fast breathing. Dogs need WATER, SHADE, COOL air
http://youtu.be/rYmk2jJZGdM
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=qHgrrA1ERgo
46 replies
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Jul 5, 2004
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Good thread, but some things need to be corrected.
jaxx lite wrote:
Jul 16th, 2011 11:03 pm
Always research on the internet or see a vet if your dog seems to have a health problem
or behaving strangely, abnormally
If your dog seems to have a sudden health problem, do not research on the internet, get your dog to the vet ASAP. A dog can't talk and cannot tell you how much distress it is in. By the time you spend an hour researching on the internet, it could be too late. If there's anything medically wrong with your dog, especially if it's heat related, take it to the vet immediately.
Most likely, your dog desperately needs your help or a vet's help
Your dog doesn't need your help if it's in medical distress, it needs the help of a vet. Take it to a vet immediately. If your dog is overheating, cool it on the way to the vet, but get it to the vet immediately so an IV can be started and cooling measures can be properly applied.

Dog drinks a lot of water (diabetes or kidney problem)

Perhaps, but likely the dog is just thirsty due to the hot weather (that is what this thread is about right, hot weather?). If you want to get your dog tested for kidney problems or diabetes I won't talk you out of it, but in the meantime, don't limit your dogs water intake in hot weather. Diabetes and kidney problems aren't going to instantly kill your dog, a lack of water in extremely hot weather will.
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Nov 23, 2010
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Please do not leave you dog or any animal in a parked car in this heat!
For all community related matters, please PM TomRFD
[OP]
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Apr 15, 2010
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oranr wrote:
Jul 20th, 2011 12:43 pm
Please do not leave you dog or any animal in a parked car in this heat!
it's not just a parked car...

a hot apt, house

hot backyard

hot park

hot sidewalk

people bring their dogs to outdoor festivals, beach, etc

dog is outside all day long or several hours

even being outside in hot weather and underneath hot sun for a few minutes
can cause trouble for a dog
(panting, heaving breathing, fast breathing)

bring him inside to a cool, dark place and give him water to drink
PROTECT your pet from HOT SUN/HEAT. Dogs can die of heat stroke/dehydration=panting, fast breathing. Dogs need WATER, SHADE, COOL air
http://youtu.be/rYmk2jJZGdM
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=qHgrrA1ERgo
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Jun 20, 2010
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jaxx lite wrote:
Jul 19th, 2011 9:48 pm


Put some bowls or saucers of water outside for the wild animals too
(squirrels, rabbits, birds, etc)

Why?
Jr. Member
Apr 5, 2011
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oranr wrote:
Jul 20th, 2011 12:43 pm
Please do not leave you dog or any animal in a parked car in this heat!

This. Just leave them at home.
Deal Addict
Apr 13, 2003
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My dog protects himself.
It's close to impossible to make him leave the air conditioned house. Once he does go outside, he won't go out of the shade.
He also sits on the air conditioner vent.
Deal Fanatic
Apr 23, 2009
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South of Ottawa
Some guy at Walmart left his two dogs in his car yesterday. All 4 windows down about 2 inches. I stood outside the car and waited, gave the poor little guys some water. I was there for 10 minutes before he came out. He said he was just stopping in for 5 minutes. wth is wrong with people/ I wouldn't even leave myself in the car for a minute with no a/c on a day like that.
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Dec 31, 2007
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Richmond Hill
Someone left their Pomerian at TooGood Pond (Markham) yesterday afternoon tied to a tree. A resident of the area stayed with the little guy for a few hours, giving him water. After nobody came back for him, the resident took him in, and posted a Found notice.
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nyik wrote:
Jul 21st, 2011 2:38 pm
Someone left their Pomerian at TooGood Pond (Markham) yesterday afternoon tied to a tree. A resident of the area stayed with the little guy for a few hours, giving him water. After nobody came back for him, the resident took him in, and posted a Found notice.

You shoud call animal control instead of waiting hours on end. I found a dog wandering around my neighbourhood a few weeks ago. Called animal control (it's on my speed dial) and they showed up within the hour.
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Dec 31, 2007
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JK400 wrote:
Jul 21st, 2011 3:10 pm
You shoud call animal control instead of waiting hours on end. I found a dog wandering around my neighbourhood a few weeks ago. Called animal control (it's on my speed dial) and they showed up within the hour.

It wasn't me. Read about it in a dog group I'm in.
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nyik wrote:
Jul 21st, 2011 3:20 pm
It wasn't me. Read about it in a dog group I'm in.

Sorry I was being grammatically incorrect there. I just meant 'you' as in 'people in general'. Was just throwing the info out there for the uninformed.
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Jul 30, 2005
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Hamilton
In this weather I think if I saw some dogs locked in a car and as long as they weren't in any immediate medical distress I would wait 5min MAX and then call the police/animal control

now the question, if you came across a dog(s) in a car and it was obvious they were in extreme distress what would you do? Call animal control? police? Break a window? what if it were a child?
Deal Guru
Sep 2, 2008
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My dog is really huge and furry and my apt isn't air conditioned. Its not so bad in here though as I've had many fans running around.

I filled my tub with cold water and tried to get him to come in with me but he wouldn't do it! He loves the water, but not the bathtub. I'll try again later!

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