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Employment Insurance - End of Contract: Am I eligible?

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  • May 26th, 2017 12:03 pm
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[OP]
Member
Jun 1, 2004
491 posts
1 upvote

Employment Insurance - End of Contract: Am I eligible?

Earlier this year I accepted a 7-month contract position. I was told upon signing on board that room could possibly be made for a full-time position.

My contract has now expired. Unfortunately, owing to staffing concerns due to a merger, the company could not keep me on board. I am now unemployed.

Today I got my Record of Employment (ROE) mailed to me from my employer. Under Section 16 (Reason for issuing this ROE) the reason cited is "E" with comment "Quit / Return to school". This is erroneous - I didn't quit on my own terms and I'm not going back to school. I'm concerned that this will make me ineligible for EI while I seek another job.

Should I go back to the employer and have them redo the ROE? I intend to cite the Service Canada site:

http://www.servicecanada.gc.ca/eng/ei/e ... uide.shtml
"Helpful hint: If the reason for issuing the ROE is an end of contract, an end of season, a temporary shutdown of operations or any other reason equivalent to a "shortage of work", indicate reason code "A". Do not include these comments in Block 18."
I believe under these terms I should qualify for EI?
25 replies
Deal Addict
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Apr 11, 2009
2412 posts
60 upvotes
Thornhill
Why don't you just call Service Canada? They have service reps for this sort of thing.
Deal Fanatic
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Nov 17, 2007
6356 posts
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Years ago I worked for them (when they were called UIC) and one aspect of my job was to get to the truth of why a person was no longer employed with the employer.

I would suggest that you do not delay in filing for your benefits as this could cause you problems later. I would include a detailed explanation as to all the things that resulted in your no longer working for the company. The agent who reviews your claim will then have to clarify with the employer as to why there is a discrepancy in the reasons given by you and the employer.

Do you have any idea why the employer would have said you quit? Was there a problem or any incident near or at the end of your contract that would explain why they said this?
[OP]
Member
Jun 1, 2004
491 posts
1 upvote
I believe it's just a mistake.

I talked to a colleague at the same firm who was in the same situation and whose contract ended a month earlier. Her ROE states A - shortage of work/end of contract. She is now collecting EI.

I've emailed HR and asked that my ROE be redone and sent back to me.
Deal Fanatic
User avatar
Jan 14, 2004
9258 posts
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Markham
If you have enough hours worked in the last 12 months. Yes you'll be eligible.

I worked a 5 month contract and didn't get extended, it made me eligible for EI because I had enough hours.
:lol:
Newbie
Mar 16, 2009
23 posts
1 upvote
Airdrie
When you apply on-line, if you state the reason for separation as "shortage of work" and the ROE states it is "quit", that automatically triggers a process where a payment services officer has to resolve the discrepancy.

Usually we just call the employer and get clarification and then phone the client (you) for a verbal agreement. In your case, it does sound like a genuine mistake, so I dont anticipate that you will have any major issues collecting EI as long as you have the prerequisite insurable hours and earnings.
Newbie
Aug 13, 2008
57 posts
2 upvotes
Talk to your employer because the ROE should be listed as Shortage of work. They didn't renew your contract or allow you to stay. So you should be qualified for E.I
Newbie
Nov 27, 2010
24 posts
2 upvotes
dymondk wrote:
Sep 27th, 2009 4:25 pm
Talk to your employer because the ROE should be listed as Shortage of work. They didn't renew your contract or allow you to stay. So you should be qualified for E.I
Sorry to bump this from 2009, but my dad's contract just ended. He was a contract employee paying CPP, EI, etc. but, his contracts were in 3-month intervals and would end, and they would sign him up again for another 3-month employee contract (paying CPP EI).

He just finished his current 3-month role and they didn't renew him. His ROE says "Code K: other" in Box 16, which I know is wrong and should be Code A: end of contract. But also his insurable earnings only show his past 3 months of work. They don't show the other 12+ months he was working 3-month contracts in a row, without interruption, paying CPP EI.

So this ROE means that my dad may be denied for EI, or be eligible for very little even though he's been working for 1-2 years straight.

Am I correct in my thinking, that he should be able to apply for EI and his insurable earnings should show his work/hours over the past 12+ months, and not just his current 3-month term? I think the HR person did it incorrectly...
Deal Addict
May 28, 2005
1881 posts
93 upvotes
mzebby wrote:
Apr 8th, 2016 3:19 pm
Sorry to bump this from 2009, but my dad's contract just ended. He was a contract employee paying CPP, EI, etc. but, his contracts were in 3-month intervals and would end, and they would sign him up again for another 3-month employee contract (paying CPP EI).

He just finished his current 3-month role and they didn't renew him. His ROE says "Code K: other" in Box 16, which I know is wrong and should be Code A: end of contract. But also his insurable earnings only show his past 3 months of work. They don't show the other 12+ months he was working 3-month contracts in a row, without interruption, paying CPP EI.

So this ROE means that my dad may be denied for EI, or be eligible for very little even though he's been working for 1-2 years straight.

Am I correct in my thinking, that he should be able to apply for EI and his insurable earnings should show his work/hours over the past 12+ months, and not just his current 3-month term? I think the HR person did it incorrectly...
The employer should either amend his ROE to include all hours worked in the last year or give him multiple ROEs for each contract. Reason for separation should also be updated too. Either way employer needs to correct the ROE
Deal Addict
User avatar
Apr 22, 2005
1295 posts
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mzebby wrote:
Apr 8th, 2016 3:19 pm
Sorry to bump this from 2009, but my dad's contract just ended. He was a contract employee paying CPP, EI, etc. but, his contracts were in 3-month intervals and would end, and they would sign him up again for another 3-month employee contract (paying CPP EI).

He just finished his current 3-month role and they didn't renew him. His ROE says "Code K: other" in Box 16, which I know is wrong and should be Code A: end of contract. But also his insurable earnings only show his past 3 months of work. They don't show the other 12+ months he was working 3-month contracts in a row, without interruption, paying CPP EI.

So this ROE means that my dad may be denied for EI, or be eligible for very little even though he's been working for 1-2 years straight.

Am I correct in my thinking, that he should be able to apply for EI and his insurable earnings should show his work/hours over the past 12+ months, and not just his current 3-month term? I think the HR person did it incorrectly...
EI looks at the amount of insurable hours over the last 52 weeks from all the jobs you've had.
Newbie
Jan 9, 2017
7 posts
What happens when you quit a job and then start another one? Do my hours just go back to zero and I have to earn again or am I disqualified from EI for a period of time?

I quite a job earlier this year (intolerable to stay but I don't want to drag my manager into it by claiming I had no choice) and started work shortly after in a contract position.

So I did leave a permanent job for a temporary one and have now worked more than 900 hours in the new job.

Does leaving a perm job for temp mean I cannot get EI for my new job even though I have done the amount of hours (excluding those worked in the job I quit)?
Deal Fanatic
Nov 21, 2011
7634 posts
1208 upvotes
Edmonton
Gtwin82 wrote:
Jan 16th, 2017 12:12 pm
What happens when you quit a job and then start another one? Do my hours just go back to zero and I have to earn again or am I disqualified from EI for a period of time?

I quite a job earlier this year (intolerable to stay but I don't want to drag my manager into it by claiming I had no choice) and started work shortly after in a contract position.

So I did leave a permanent job for a temporary one and have now worked more than 900 hours in the new job.

Does leaving a perm job for temp mean I cannot get EI for my new job even though I have done the amount of hours (excluding those worked in the job I quit)?
You have enough new hours to qualify so it doesn't matter about the quit
Newbie
Jan 9, 2017
7 posts
clseea wrote:
Jan 16th, 2017 6:04 pm
You have enough new hours to qualify so it doesn't matter about the quit
Awesome! Thank you so much I was worried. I'm new to Canada so EI is very new to me.

Thanks
Deal Addict
User avatar
Apr 22, 2005
1295 posts
208 upvotes
A few Rule of thumbs folks when it comes to EI ...

1. NEVER assume you won't get EI because you were "fired". 9 times out of 10 the employer still puts it down on the ROE as a layoff.

2. If EI denies your claim, ALWAYS appeal. (This rule applies to those of you applying for Income Support too)

3. NEVER assume you don't have enough hours to make a claim. I see so many clients applying for Income Support who assumed they weren't eligible for EI and they are.
Newbie
Mar 10, 2017
2 posts
I have a similar question. I currently have a permanent job in which i have worked for more than a year. I am thinking of quitting this permanent to take up a temporary 3 month fulltime job offer . There is a very minute chance of the job getting extended. After the end of this 3 months would I still be eligible for EI if I cant find any other job or the job doesn't get extended?

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