Careers

Engineering Career Vs Accounting Degree

  • Last Updated:
  • Jan 20th, 2019 2:32 pm
Tags:
None
Deal Addict
Oct 10, 2008
3153 posts
22 upvotes
sardaukar wrote:
May 14th, 2009 1:51 pm
If you excel in commerce studies, there is also always an opportunity to obtain a concurrent degree with medicine, law, or MBA.

The point is that, it is much more difficult to get a high GPA in engineering studies, as compared to commerce. For the same amount of effort, it's possible that one can get a 3.5+ in commerce while only achieving a B-/C+ in engineering. I know of many people, bright students back in high school, who got screwed by engineering so badly that they had trouble switching out to even general arts program. Putting a bunch of smart, high-achieving high school graduates in the same program has one unavoidable effect: someone has to be at the receiving end of those C's and D's thanks to the bell-curves!

Not to mention the quality of university life in commerce is far superior to that in engineering. Being successful isn't only about marks and degrees; it's also about the networks and connections you make throughout your lifetime. Being in commerce gives you that edge that most geeky engineers do not possess.

If your ultimate goal is to do medicine / law, then you're doing yourself a disservice by getting your bachelor's in engineering. Much better to choose an easier major (eg. commerce) where you have a much bigger chance to excel in, enjoy your undergrad years and not get burnt out, and then apply to medicine / law with a stellar GPA and extracurricular activities record.
Couldn't have said it better myself.

An engineering student can easily have DOUBLE the amount of class-hours (LEC, TUT, LABS) than the average commerce student.

An eng. student has to spend much more time STUDYING than the commerce student...plus, it is not like you can just sit down, open a book, and understand (for engineering). You have to hunt down the one person who knows the topic, you have to read up on the material through other sites, hunt the Prof/TA. I imagine conditions are similar (not learning on the spot) for commerce, but they have much more TIME to do so.

Again, with the abundance of time for a commerce student - he can go out and engage in EXTRACURRICULAR activity, things that actually help you get a job, you know. Sure engineers can do it, but they'd have to throw out their social life outside the window. Whereas commerce student need not throw their social lives out the door...they still have TIME. It may be difficult for an engineer to understand, but social lives actually effect your mental well-being, being with yourself for so much time can negatively affect you. Your communication/interpersonal skills weaken, you begin to talk to yourself, etc, etc.


Oh, and with the lack of TIME you have in engineering...you really cannot go to the gym much, if AT ALL. I would imagine most Commerce students can go to the gym quite often...my friend who is 2nd year Rotman Commerce at UofT had class two days a week...pretty sure he went to the gym quite often. Lack of exercise effects your mental and physical health (duh).

Oh, and reading balance sheet are easier than solving PDE's.
Banned
User avatar
Jun 19, 2006
9349 posts
52 upvotes
sardaukar wrote:
May 14th, 2009 1:51 pm
The point is that, it is much more difficult to get a high GPA in engineering studies, as compared to commerce. For the same amount of effort, it's possible that one can get a 3.5+ in commerce while only achieving a B-/C+ in engineering. I know of many people, bright students back in high school, who got screwed by engineering so badly that they had trouble switching out to even general arts program. Putting a bunch of smart, high-achieving high school graduates in the same program has one unavoidable effect: someone has to be at the receiving end of those C's and D's thanks to the bell-curves!
+1, unfortunately, very true. And, anecdotally, admissions committees are reluctant to admit an engineer to medicine/law/dentistry, because of the widespread, albeit true belief, that engineering, in and of itself, is a good career. They'd rather help out someone who, for lack of better words, wouldn't have nearly the same earnings prospect.

Not to mention the quality of university life in commerce is far superior to that in engineering. Being successful isn't only about marks and degrees; it's also about the networks and connections you make throughout your lifetime. Being in commerce gives you that edge that most geeky engineers do not possess.
Guess it depends upon how you define 'success'; engineers get to be at the forefront of technology and innovation, engineers get to earn counter-cyclical income, engineers traditionally have had much higher salaries, engineers traditionally have had much greater growth paths in businesses.

Don't let the travesty of the past decade, with zero economic growth, cloud your long-term view of things.

If your ultimate goal is to do medicine / law, then you're doing yourself a disservice by getting your bachelor's in engineering. Much better to choose an easier major (eg. commerce) where you have a much bigger chance to excel in, enjoy your undergrad years and not get burnt out, and then apply to medicine / law with a stellar GPA and extracurricular activities record.
Quite unfortunately, I'd have to agree, although it is to society's detriment that medicine programs do not admit many engineers.
"I worked with several H1B employees that were/are borderline ********. One of them wanted to spray an electrical patch panel with solvent to see if it would make the “network go faster”". <--- lol (source)
Banned
User avatar
Jun 19, 2006
9349 posts
52 upvotes
aac85 wrote:
May 14th, 2009 2:24 pm
kind of off topic...

but sardaukar, you can't compare high school smarts with university. i think its a joke when i keep hearing people have 90+ avg in high school and failing miserably in university. no offense to those still in high school....but there is such a wide discrepancy in standards and grade inflation across the country. i seriously doubt high school grades would be a consistent indicator of post-secondary successes.
Grade inflation, and time management..

A lot of people really struggle with the whole being away from home thing too. First year is a very traumatic experience for many; kids go from a life relatively free of stress, money concerns, etc. -- to a world where they have to be much more independant, in heavy amounts of debt, etc.

Not to mention those evil first-year math profs whose goal in life is to eradicate students from the university by making relatively simple things overly difficult.
"I worked with several H1B employees that were/are borderline ********. One of them wanted to spray an electrical patch panel with solvent to see if it would make the “network go faster”". <--- lol (source)
Sr. Member
User avatar
May 19, 2008
530 posts
6 upvotes
Wherever my job take…
sardaukar wrote:
May 14th, 2009 1:51 pm
If you excel in commerce studies, there is also always an opportunity to obtain a concurrent degree with medicine, law, or MBA.

The point is that, it is much more difficult to get a high GPA in engineering studies, as compared to commerce. For the same amount of effort, it's possible that one can get a 3.5+ in commerce while only achieving a B-/C+ in engineering. I know of many people, bright students back in high school, who got screwed by engineering so badly that they had trouble switching out to even general arts program. Putting a bunch of smart, high-achieving high school graduates in the same program has one unavoidable effect: someone has to be at the receiving end of those C's and D's thanks to the bell-curves!

Not to mention the quality of university life in commerce is far superior to that in engineering. Being successful isn't only about marks and degrees; it's also about the networks and connections you make throughout your lifetime. Being in commerce gives you that edge that most geeky engineers do not possess.

If your ultimate goal is to do medicine / law, then you're doing yourself a disservice by getting your bachelor's in engineering. Much better to choose an easier major (eg. commerce) where you have a much bigger chance to excel in, enjoy your undergrad years and not get burnt out, and then apply to medicine / law with a stellar GPA and extracurricular activities record.
What edge do commerce students get? University life is what you make of it. You can be a commerce student and still have no friends. If you manage your time wisely in engineering, there are opportunities to spend time partying. I had lots of time to spend for extra curricular activities and social events. My course load was heavy, but doable because I organized my time very well. Engineers don't spend all their time solving problems and can obtain a good GPA if they so desired.

Also, commerce students won't be able to apply for engineering co-op's or internships. That means, the majority of them will stay in debt after graduating. While, engineering students can pay off their whole tuition from one good internship placement. Because engineering interns get paid a good salary during their work placement. I managed to graduate with no debt and I still had money left over for a bike. I'm glad that I won't have to wake up in the middle of the night thinking about how to pay those interest rates.

No offense, but the engineering students that you know are "social engineers". Their GPA is inversely proportional to the amount of time they spend socializing. More time at the bar means ****** GPA and poor performance + STD's. Unfortunately, they went into engineering with the wrong intentions. Most likely they were looking to leech off other hard working students and they failed miserably.

Networking skills are also important and engineering gives you the opportunity to develop them. You can get exposed early on in your university career to managers of top utility, consulting and business management companies. Companies like Bain, OPG, HydroOne hire engineering graduates for management positions after they have interned. They know that engineers have a strong work ethic and are capable of tackling complicated problems. I've been to meetings as a student with shareholders who have the ability to manipulate management at the highest levels.

Also, there are very lucky business students who end up with very high paying jobs. But the majority of them are overworked, unemployed or underemployed. Connections will only get you so far, that's why it's important to learn how to be self sufficient. You can't expect people to mother you, hold your hand and offer you a high paying job. Engineering teaches you to be innovative in your studies and career development.

I agree that engineering is not for everyone, but you don't need to be a genius to study it.
Banned
User avatar
Jun 19, 2006
9349 posts
52 upvotes
mike24 wrote:
May 14th, 2009 2:52 pm
Companies like Bain, OPG, HydroOne hire engineering graduates for management positions after they have interned.
Its unethical, and in some provinces, unlawful for engineers to join unions, because of conflict-of-interest concerns, so in those unionized outfits, engineers are, by default, part of the overall 'management' group. That isn't to say new hire engineers are magically 'managers' though -- it just means that they aren't part of the unions with the tradespeople.

Personally, straight out of school, I managed a group of 8-10 tradespeople with a fair degree of autonomy, and more broadly, oversaw the maintenance of hundreds of millions of dollars in assets. But thats because I had gained experience doing so earlier.
Also, there are very lucky business students who end up with very high paying jobs. But the majority of them are overworked, unemployed or underemployed. Connections will only get you so far, that's why it's important to learn how to be self sufficient. You can't expect people to mother you, hold your hand and offer you a high paying job. Engineering teaches you to be innovative in your studies and career development.
Yeah, the past decade has been very atypical.
I agree that engineering is not for everyone, but you don't need to be a genius to study it.
Yeah, most of engineering is slightly above average intelligence/talent, mixed with strongly above-average time and project management skills. I've seen top-IQ people flunk out of engineering because their time management (and people) skills sucked. And I've seen some otherwise pretty dumb people do very well because they knew how to manage time (and people), and they had perserverance to succeed.
"I worked with several H1B employees that were/are borderline ********. One of them wanted to spray an electrical patch panel with solvent to see if it would make the “network go faster”". <--- lol (source)
Jr. Member
Feb 2, 2008
110 posts
pitz wrote:
May 2nd, 2009 3:10 pm
Haha.. Well seriously, over the past hundred years, engineers have easily out-earned accountants. In fact, engineering earnings have traditionally been higher than that of lawyers, salesmen, finance-men, and basically every profession other than medicine and dentistry.
That is totally untrue.
Banned
User avatar
Jun 19, 2006
9349 posts
52 upvotes
EARTHY wrote:
May 14th, 2009 3:11 pm
That is totally untrue.
And your source is.....

I'll dig mine up...if you dig yours up :)
"I worked with several H1B employees that were/are borderline ********. One of them wanted to spray an electrical patch panel with solvent to see if it would make the “network go faster”". <--- lol (source)
Member
Nov 5, 2004
223 posts
1 upvote
pitz wrote:
May 14th, 2009 4:41 pm
And your source is.....

I'll dig mine up...if you dig yours up :)
you made the claim..the burden is on you

that is unless you were just talking out of your a$$
Banned
User avatar
Jun 19, 2006
9349 posts
52 upvotes
affy wrote:
May 14th, 2009 5:11 pm
you made the claim..the burden is on you
You made the claim of untruth, therefore, there is a burden of proof of untruth, if, indeed, you can actually prove or show 'untruth'.

http://research.chicagogsb.edu/economy/ ... les/83.pdf

Page 43 has some charts of 'relative earnings' -- only MBA's consistently have higher earnings than engineers in the United States out of the professions listed (law/accounting (business)/engineering/natural sciences/sales). And a MBA traditionally has been a more advanced degree; an extra few years beyond a bachelors degree, good work experience, etc.

Page 38 shows that the average starting auditor/starting accountant salary is, on average, historically, roughly 3dB lower than the starting engineering salary.

I will dig up that reference for 1950s engineering salaries in Canada -- but that paper should give you something to chew on for a while.


that is unless you were just talking out of your a$$
Grow up.
"I worked with several H1B employees that were/are borderline ********. One of them wanted to spray an electrical patch panel with solvent to see if it would make the “network go faster”". <--- lol (source)
Member
Apr 19, 2009
271 posts
2 upvotes
november 1992. that paper is outdated. its based on historical trends from 1950s to end of 1980s. even if future projections were made, it would not be accurate since the markets has changed considerably.

Back then, accountants in general were seen as conservative bean counters. very few pursued this career due to lackluster compensations. the profession only started picking up steam after 2000. the stigma associated with this profession totally changed. accounting can be anything now....audit, corporate finance, forensics, etc.

i truly believe the skills developed is the most transferable of any profession.
Sr. Member
Mar 3, 2009
538 posts
Starrup wrote:
May 1st, 2009 8:39 pm
Hello,
I am currently in grade 11 and wondering about which careers interest me. I have strong skills and grades in math(88) , physics(80) and accounting(90), english (80) and will be taking chemisty in summer school (grade 11).
My dilemia is that I have interesting in accounting and Engineering but I cant pick between the two.
How about a health care profession?
Banned
User avatar
Jun 19, 2006
9349 posts
52 upvotes
aac85 wrote:
May 14th, 2009 5:57 pm
november 1992. that paper is outdated. its based on historical trends from 1950s to end of 1980s. even if future projections were made, it would not be accurate since the markets has changed considerably.
That's a 40-year view of things, which is basically a generation. If you have anything more recent, please post it for the benefit of everyone reading.
Back then, accountants in general were seen as conservative bean counters. very few pursued this career due to lackluster compensations. the profession only started picking up steam after 2000. the stigma associated with this profession totally changed. accounting can be anything now....audit, corporate finance, forensics, etc.
And in 1992, the Internet didn't exist, and CAD/CAM was not as pervasive as it is now -- now gazillions of engineers are involved in both. You can make the argument for both professions. The growth after 2000 was heavily due to the financial bubble, just like much of the growth in IT in the 1990s was due to the Internet bubble. The purpose of posting historic data was to show that harder work and more investment in education for engineers pays off handsomely when viewed over an entire cycle, not just the very short term.

i truly believe the skills developed is the most transferable of any profession.
Fads come and go; but in the long term, hard work, intelligence, and dedication are values that will lead to the greatest levels, on average, of wealth. The engineering colleges are empty, while the accounting and business schools are overflowing with the smartest students -- that will eventually serve to reinforce the cycle.
"I worked with several H1B employees that were/are borderline ********. One of them wanted to spray an electrical patch panel with solvent to see if it would make the “network go faster”". <--- lol (source)
Sr. Member
User avatar
May 19, 2008
530 posts
6 upvotes
Wherever my job take…
pitz wrote:
May 14th, 2009 2:43 pm

Quite unfortunately, I'd have to agree, although it is to society's detriment that medicine programs do not admit many engineers.
Engineers do have a good chance at medicine. With the advent of biomedical engineering, students can learn how to model the human respiratory, cardiovascular and neurological systems with electrical models.

For example, the heart itself is a pump, and it's parameters can be described using differential equations consisting of pressure, flow rate, resistance, compliance and inertia. This is directly translated to voltage, resistance, capacitance and inductance.

Engineers can design and describe accurately how the heart functions for the development of medical equipment, procedures and therapies. Medical admissions committees will accept engineers into their programs. Obviously it's better to talk about how relevant engineering is to medicine compared with commerce during the medical school admission interviews.

The society can thank engineers for tasers, pacemakers, defibrillators and other medical equipment that saves and takes away lives daily.
Banned
User avatar
Jun 19, 2006
9349 posts
52 upvotes
Exactly mike24. I'm sure engineering would be a good background even if a person just wanted to become a GP. And engineers, being very good with 'systems', would do awesome in many specialties. Psychiatry, for instance, is all about biochemical systems in the brain, for instance. But the truth of the matter is that, because of the grade depression in engineering, as described by others, it is very difficult for an engineering graduate to obtain admission to med school.
"I worked with several H1B employees that were/are borderline ********. One of them wanted to spray an electrical patch panel with solvent to see if it would make the “network go faster”". <--- lol (source)

Top