Careers

Engineering Career Vs Accounting Degree

  • Last Updated:
  • Jan 20th, 2019 2:32 pm
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Sr. Member
Mar 3, 2009
538 posts
Some engineering students on RFD have found good jobs
- $60 000 starting salary, $80 000 current salary, close to 6 figure salary in USA (new job), etc.

example:
ian1386 wrote:Starting a job down in the US next week starting a little shy of 6 figures base salary, but signing bonuses guarantee 6 figures for at least the first two years. Certainly proud...fresh grad at 23.

I just finished SE at Waterloo, and I can answer a few things for you:

1) High school marks don't really have that much indication on how "smart" people are. Everybody in my class had high 80-90s coming out of high school, and we lost about half our class after the first year. Making it through university has little to do with how "smart" you are and almost entirely depends on how willing you are to work hard. You have to consider it a full-time job. Some weeks you may have little work, but others you may have to pull many all-nighters to get stuff done on time.

2) Don't look at how "hard" courses are...take what interests you. If you hate programming then you'll fail out of Software, regardless of the amount of work. You won't do work you don't like.

Engineering will require a LOT of work in university.
Newbie
Jan 10, 2019
1 posts
As a marine engineer i work 70 a week minimum.The second engineer I work with does 84. Not to mention the extra time due to faults and improving myself in the field.
Deal Addict
Nov 10, 2018
2446 posts
2408 upvotes
Why not do both?

I'm a lot older than most people on this forum but I do know that I have a very niche education and a very niche professional career.

I have an engineering degree, a law degree, and have passed the bar. I also have a MBA but that was the easiest part of everything. I am no longer a practicing lawyer, but I do work in management at a FAANG organization and lead a team of corporate lawyers. I also am a tech fanatic and love cars, and love getting into the weeds when it comes to car stuff, and still have a massive passion for law and its intricacies. I'm also a woman, but that's beside the fact.

I don't think I'm inherently smart and I do know that I had no idea I would ever end up doing what I'm doing. The only advice I have to young folks these days is to find something niche and valued, and do that. Everybody has a degree in something, but few people have an education and experience that is relatively diverse, and deep.

So to answer the OP, and this thread was TLDR for me, why not do both? Or at least eventually? Trust me when I say that if your goal is to maximize your TC, you'll do well this way. I speak from experience.
For legal topics and discussions, the opinion, guidance, and thoughts provided are my own and are not considered to be legal advice, in any manner.
Sr. Member
Jan 12, 2017
555 posts
210 upvotes
Definitely agree with this post.

Engineering and accounting careers can be very stereotypical if that's what you desire - if that's the case, engineering sounds more in line with what you want.

If you're more willing to or the type to explore and welcome opportunities, there is nothing that forces you to only have an engineering career if you studied engineering. At one point, and potentially still the case, banks were the largest employers of new engineers.

I would warn you away from civil consulting engineering though. That profession is a race to the bottom...
angryaudifanatic wrote:
Jan 18th, 2019 9:18 pm
Why not do both?

I'm a lot older than most people on this forum but I do know that I have a very niche education and a very niche professional career.

I have an engineering degree, a law degree, and have passed the bar. I also have a MBA but that was the easiest part of everything. I am no longer a practicing lawyer, but I do work in management at a FAANG organization and lead a team of corporate lawyers. I also am a tech fanatic and love cars, and love getting into the weeds when it comes to car stuff, and still have a massive passion for law and its intricacies. I'm also a woman, but that's beside the fact.

I don't think I'm inherently smart and I do know that I had no idea I would ever end up doing what I'm doing. The only advice I have to young folks these days is to find something niche and valued, and do that. Everybody has a degree in something, but few people have an education and experience that is relatively diverse, and deep.

So to answer the OP, and this thread was TLDR for me, why not do both? Or at least eventually? Trust me when I say that if your goal is to maximize your TC, you'll do well this way. I speak from experience.
Deal Addict
Oct 16, 2013
2221 posts
588 upvotes
Toronto
Why re-raise a 10 year old topic?
Sr. Member
Apr 14, 2017
866 posts
407 upvotes
DT Calgary
Chickennbeans wrote:
Jan 18th, 2019 9:30 pm
Definitely agree with this post.

Engineering and accounting careers can be very stereotypical if that's what you desire - if that's the case, engineering sounds more in line with what you want.

If you're more willing to or the type to explore and welcome opportunities, there is nothing that forces you to only have an engineering career if you studied engineering. At one point, and potentially still the case, banks were the largest employers of new engineers.

I would warn you away from civil consulting engineering though. That profession is a race to the bottom...
Banks hire very few new undergraduate engineers.
Deal Addict
Nov 10, 2018
2446 posts
2408 upvotes
FreshCo wrote:
Jan 20th, 2019 1:48 am
Banks hire very few new undergraduate engineers.
The term "engineer" is loosely defined in say, Ontario, but very strictly defined in Quebec. Banks do hire a bunch of engineers, but software engineers, not the traditional civil engineer.

The prevalence and dependence on AI now has caused the Big 5 here in the GTA to hire software engineers like crazy.
For legal topics and discussions, the opinion, guidance, and thoughts provided are my own and are not considered to be legal advice, in any manner.

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