Entrepreneurship & Small Business

Expiring domain name - how to acquire it?

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[OP]
Newbie
Mar 20, 2007
33 posts

Expiring domain name - how to acquire it?

Hi,

I am interested in registering for a .ca domain name. Unfortunately, it is taken. I checked CIRA and I see that it is expiring next week on August 7, 2008. I checked the domain site and it contains some standard ad links. Let us assume that the current owner is going to let the domain name expire. What is the best way to acquire the domain name? Should I try to register for the domain name on August 8, 2008 or August 7, 2008.

Thanks
16 replies
Deal Addict
Apr 2, 2007
1423 posts
61 upvotes
Toronto
contact the domain owner and pay for transfer fee.
There is still a grace period where the current owner can still re-new the domain.

Chances are, the owner has already renewed with the domain registra and you won't see it until after the current expiry date.

So... if you really want the domain name.. ante up.
Deal Addict
Mar 15, 2003
1407 posts
19 upvotes
If it's on Cira's to be released list, I suspect it's beyond the ability of the owner to recapture it. Plus, you could be alerting them to the 'value' of the domain and have them asking for $500 or $5000. So they renew it for $10 and hang on to it. I think its unlikely they would re-register it then sell it to you cheap. I've bought and sold domains through the years and the one common thread is that people are stone-cold stupid when it comes to the value of their domains - and worse when they think someone wants it. So avoid that at all costs (unless it's not expiring).

If it's on the to be expired list, then it goes up for auction at Tuesday at 2:00 I think. All the registration companies can put in automated bids for it, and they've got some way of figuring out who wins.

So what you need to do is find a registrar that has a system that allows you to bid on to be released domains, and place a bid with them (who will then try and get the domain on Tuesday for you). I don't do this with .ca's myself,but if it's really important, you might consider bidding at a whole bunch of different registrars for the same domain. That would increase the likelihood of you getting the domain against other bidders (because it's not a straight auction from all the registrars. You might bid $500 at registrar A, I bid $10 at registrar B, and if registrar B grabs the domain, I get it for $10 and your $500 bid means nothing).

I use namespro for expired domains. They seem 'ok' at getting the domains though nothing to write home about.
Deal Addict
Dec 13, 2007
1489 posts
41 upvotes
Toronto
wheel wrote:
Jul 29th, 2008 2:46 pm
If it's on Cira's to be released list, I suspect it's beyond the ability of the owner to recapture it.
Huh? The... what list? If the domain name expires, current owner absolutely CAN recapture it for 30 days after that. (Could be it's not 30 days, but some period of time.) I had my domain expired... Twice. Got it back when alerted by customers :)

Your description of the bidding process appears to be completely wrong. All of .ca registrars have fixed price for domain registration, CIRA is non-profit. What auction then? The only possible auction holder is the current owner, but that's a whole different story.

OP: Don't base your business on a catchy domain-name. That's poor business judgment. Just pick from a myriads of available names. Your product and services should be your focus, not the stupid domain name.
Deal Addict
Mar 15, 2003
1407 posts
19 upvotes
slavka012 wrote:
Jul 29th, 2008 6:05 pm
Huh? The... what list? If the domain name expires, current owner absolutely CAN recapture it for 30 days after that. (Could be it's not 30 days, but some period of time.) I had my domain expired... Twice. Got it back when alerted by customers :)

Your description of the bidding process appears to be completely wrong. All of .ca registrars have fixed price for domain registration, CIRA is non-profit. What auction then? The only possible auction holder is the current owner, but that's a whole different story.

OP: Don't base your business on a catchy domain-name. That's poor business judgment. Just pick from a myriads of available names. Your product and services should be your focus, not the stupid domain name.
Dealon is correct. My post is correct. I pick up dropped .ca's all the time and am familiar with the process.

You've got a limited time after your domain expires to recapture it, probably the 30 days. After that it goes into Cira's to be released list which is published each week and at that point it is open to an auction system at the individual registrars.

If it's within the 30 day grace period, as I noted, you're going to screw yourself if you call the current owner. They'll re-register it and start demanding $5000 for this 'now valuable' domain. Let it lapse and pick it up once it goes into Cira's TBR (to be released). You can probably pick it up for $20.

This week I missed the auction by an hour but there was a domain I wanted. The auction expired, no one bid on it, and I picked it up for $12 as a 'new' registration an hour after the auction. No bidding, no nothing. That's the other, more risky option.

The problem with not bidding at multiple registrars is that some other registrar may get the domain. I missed edsel.ca because of this. Dang me!
Deal Expert
Oct 20, 2001
18709 posts
1189 upvotes
Sauga
wheel wrote:
Jul 29th, 2008 2:46 pm
If it's on the to be expired list, then it goes up for auction at Tuesday at 2:00 I think. All the registration companies can put in automated bids for it, and they've got some way of figuring out who wins.
Not quite. Individual registrars do have their own auctions among their own users to determine which one gets the domain in case they catch it when CIRA releases it... but CIRA itself has no auction. As it says here:
the registration fee for the registration of a TBR Domain Name shall be the same as the registration fee for a domain name registration, as it is defined in the Fees Policy and Rules at www.cira.ca/en/cat_Registrar.html as “Registration Fee”.
CIRA's TBR Session is more like a free-for-all -- first registrar to send the request for a particular domain gets it. The rules of conduct in the TBR Session are mentioned in the PDF I linked to above.

I think the reason some registrars accept bids before the drop is to gauge interest in the domains and to figure out the order of priority for the registration attempts during the TBR Session.


rktest05:
Wait until mid or late August and see if it is still not renewed. If it isn't, then you can hope that it goes to the TBR list around September 7...at that point, you can try to register it through one of the registrars that participates in the TBR registrations. But if it does get renewed before September 7, then you can contact the owner some time after the renewal and try to negotiate a sale.

For now, just sit tight and hope it gets dropped.
Deal Addict
Mar 15, 2003
1407 posts
19 upvotes
Rehan wrote:
Jul 30th, 2008 1:42 am
Not quite. Individual registrars do have their own auctions among their own users to determine which one gets the domain in case they catch it when CIRA releases it... but CIRA itself has no auction. As it says here:

CIRA's TBR Session is more like a free-for-all -- first registrar to send the request for a particular domain gets it. The rules of conduct in the TBR Session are mentioned in the PDF I linked to above.
Yup. That's why I mentioned this:
because it's not a straight auction from all the registrars. You might bid $500 at registrar A, I bid $10 at registrar B, and if registrar B grabs the domain, I get it for $10 and your $500 bid means nothing)
So if you really want a domain, bid at multiple registrars.

Still, this whole picking up dropped .ca domains is a 'please keep your mouth shut' things :) . Everyone starts preaching it and all of a sudden we're in the .com dropped domain frenzy. So keep it to yourself!
Deal Fanatic
User avatar
Nov 28, 2005
6044 posts
16 upvotes
Toronto
wheel wrote:
Jul 30th, 2008 8:27 am
Still, this whole picking up dropped .ca domains is a 'please keep your mouth shut' things :) . Everyone starts preaching it and all of a sudden we're in the .com dropped domain frenzy. So keep it to yourself!
LOL! It's more a demand and supply thing (more than informed or ignorant).

But first, there is NO TBR (to be released) domains on Aug 7 (which is a Thursday), so I'm not sure if the OP is a) actually talking about the TBR on Aug 6, or b) referring to what he saw on the WHOIS.

If it is scenario A, domains listed as TBR have already gone through that mandatory 30 day redemption period, and will be available on that day. HOWEVER, you'll have to wait till a bit later in the day to do that MANUALLY, provided the drop-catchers have not snapped it up. Fortunately, unlike .COM's, not all half decent expiring .CA domains are picked up.

If it is scenario B, then you'll have to confirm its release about a month from now, by checking that TBR list on CIRA's website.

Hope this clarifies things a bit, and not adding more to the confusion.
Deal Addict
Jul 25, 2007
1115 posts
24 upvotes
qster wrote:
Jul 29th, 2008 2:01 pm
contact the domain owner and pay for transfer fee.
There is still a grace period where the current owner can still re-new the domain.

Chances are, the owner has already renewed with the domain registra and you won't see it until after the current expiry date.

So... if you really want the domain name.. ante up.
i'm new at this domain stuff... is there an automatic renewal option or prepaid for x amount of years? Or do you have to renew every year?
Deal Fanatic
User avatar
Nov 28, 2005
6044 posts
16 upvotes
Toronto
jp06 wrote:
Aug 10th, 2008 6:27 pm
i'm new at this domain stuff... is there an automatic renewal option or prepaid for x amount of years? Or do you have to renew every year?
Some (actually most, who wouldn't) registrars offer automatic renewals if you have your credit card on file. And you can also renew your domain for up to 10 years.
Deal Addict
Jul 25, 2007
1115 posts
24 upvotes
teknoluv wrote:
Aug 10th, 2008 8:04 pm
Some (actually most, who wouldn't) registrars offer automatic renewals if you have your credit card on file. And you can also renew your domain for up to 10 years.
thanks!
Newbie
Feb 27, 2015
23 posts
2 upvotes
Winnipeg, MB
I know this post is old, but for TBR domains, if we search for the domain availability in a site, will the site likely bid on it and then try to sell it to us at a hire cost?

I am puzzled on how most sites are charging $60 for this tbr domain process, when .ca domains are advertised for $1.99

How can we participate in bidding or snagging a domain that is expiring without paying $60?
Newbie
Jun 29, 2012
16 posts
2 upvotes
MONTRÉAL
momandpopstore wrote:
Apr 18th, 2016 9:52 pm
I know this post is old, but for TBR domains, if we search for the domain availability in a site, will the site likely bid on it and then try to sell it to us at a hire cost?

I am puzzled on how most sites are charging $60 for this tbr domain process, when .ca domains are advertised for $1.99

How can we participate in bidding or snagging a domain that is expiring without paying $60?
You pretty much have to pay a service to catch a domain for you. DropCatch and others have direct access to the registry and send thousands of registration requests per second, there's no way you can catch it on your own.
Newbie
May 15, 2014
4 posts
1 upvote
Edmonton, AB
momandpopstore wrote:
Apr 18th, 2016 9:52 pm
I know this post is old, but for TBR domains, if we search for the domain availability in a site, will the site likely bid on it and then try to sell it to us at a hire cost?

I am puzzled on how most sites are charging $60 for this tbr domain process, when .ca domains are advertised for $1.99

How can we participate in bidding or snagging a domain that is expiring without paying $60?
By shopping around. ;-) Different registrars charge different prices for their TBR bidding or auction services.

A very reputable registrar with probably the most inexpensive TBR service is Namespro.ca where the minimum bid for a TBR domain starts at C$16.88, and if Namespro is able to catch the domain and you're the highest bidder, the domain is yours without paying anything extra, i.e. your bid pays for the registration too. So, at the minimum bid of C$16.88, Namespro is only charging you $3.00 extra over their regular .ca registration price (C$13.88 as of today; as low as C$10.88 for transfer during promotion, for example).

And indeed, Namespro was able to secure the domain that I wanted, and all I had to pay was C$16.88 + taxes, so this made me very happy. Highly recommended!

Another registrar with inexpensive TBR service is dot-ca-registry.ca (a.k.a. rapidregister.ca) where their minimum bid starts at C$10.00, which is separate from their domain registration fee (currently C$13.75), so I guess that means at minimum bid, if you win the domain, you pay C$23.75 + taxes at the end. (I haven't tried their TBR service, but they look legit.)

So, for yes, start with Namespro.ca and dot-ca-registry.ca in your search for inexpensive TBR domain services. I haven't been able to discover others that charge less than $10. Hope you can discover more and post it here! :-) For your information, the full list of registrars offering TBR registration are listed here: https://cira.ca/current-registrars/registrar-list (select "To-Be-Release (TBR) Registrations" under "Advanced Services" and click [Apply] to narrow down the list).

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