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  • Oct 31st, 2017 6:21 pm
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Deal Addict
May 14, 2009
4521 posts
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Jimbobs wrote:
Oct 30th, 2017 4:46 pm
This argument: "Energy balance is still what drives weight gain or loss. There isn't a shred of proof showing otherwise."
Rampone AJ, Reynolds PJ. Obesity: thermodynamic principles in perspective. Life Sci 1988;43:93.

Hall KD, Heymsfield SB, Kemnitz JW, Klein S, Schoeller DA, Speakman JR. Energy balance and its components: implications for body weight regulation. The American Journal of Clinical Nutrition. 2012;95(4):989-994.

Hill JO, Wyatt HR, Peters JC. Energy Balance and Obesity. Circulation. 2012;126(1):126-132.

Galgani J, Ravussin E. Energy metabolism, fuel selection and body weight regulation. International journal of obesity (2005). 2008;32(Suppl 7):S109-S119.
Deal Fanatic
Dec 11, 2008
7314 posts
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Genetics can only take you so far, diet can change almost anything.

You can hear healthy lifestyle people get cancer and die. You hear people who develop diabetes and then change diet and then poof, all better.

At the end of the day, yolo so people can choose what they want. I am hoping the odds of eating rather "healthy" with moderate exercise will keep my body in good shape. I don't need to live forever, I need to live well.

My only issue with fat, skinny or whatever is that they impact others. So yeah fat people on a plane and subway where they take up so much room and spill over into your seat, not good. Those who are reckless in sports, overweight, smoke etc and use up health care, not good. Prevention is key.
Deal Fanatic
Nov 1, 2006
6319 posts
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Toronto
amz155 wrote:
Oct 30th, 2017 6:18 pm
Rampone AJ, Reynolds PJ. Obesity: thermodynamic principles in perspective. Life Sci 1988;43:93.

Hall KD, Heymsfield SB, Kemnitz JW, Klein S, Schoeller DA, Speakman JR. Energy balance and its components: implications for body weight regulation. The American Journal of Clinical Nutrition. 2012;95(4):989-994.

Hill JO, Wyatt HR, Peters JC. Energy Balance and Obesity. Circulation. 2012;126(1):126-132.

Galgani J, Ravussin E. Energy metabolism, fuel selection and body weight regulation. International journal of obesity (2005). 2008;32(Suppl 7):S109-S119.
Thanks. Here is a more recent report that supports the energy-balance theory but questions whether "... genetic, epigenetic factors and the microbiota could influence individual responses to diet and physical activity ...". I know many people use this as an excuse.

Energy balance and obesity: what are the main drivers?
Deal Fanatic
Nov 1, 2006
6319 posts
490 upvotes
Toronto
speedyforme wrote:
Oct 31st, 2017 7:55 am
Genetics can only take you so far, diet can change almost anything.

You can hear healthy lifestyle people get cancer and die. You hear people who develop diabetes and then change diet and then poof, all better.

At the end of the day, yolo so people can choose what they want. I am hoping the odds of eating rather "healthy" with moderate exercise will keep my body in good shape. I don't need to live forever, I need to live well.

My only issue with fat, skinny or whatever is that they impact others. So yeah fat people on a plane and subway where they take up so much room and spill over into your seat, not good. Those who are reckless in sports, overweight, smoke etc and use up health care, not good. Prevention is key.
The trouble with this argument is that you're assuming that genetics are "fixed", that you are stuck with what you get. In fact, it appears that they are less fixed than we once thought and that diet, exercise etc. can change things. Epigenetics: How to alter your genes
Deal Fanatic
Dec 11, 2008
7314 posts
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Jimbobs wrote:
Oct 31st, 2017 11:11 am
The trouble with this argument is that you're assuming that genetics are "fixed", that you are stuck with what you get. In fact, it appears that they are less fixed than we once thought and that diet, exercise etc. can change things. Epigenetics: How to alter your genes
Actually that is what I am saying. Genetics can only do so much so if your family has high cholesterol, I believe you can reverse it with diet etc.
Deal Fanatic
Nov 1, 2006
6319 posts
490 upvotes
Toronto
speedyforme wrote:
Oct 31st, 2017 12:40 pm
Actually that is what I am saying. Genetics can only do so much so if your family has high cholesterol, I believe you can reverse it with diet etc.
In that case, I misunderstood your previous post.

I had an older friend who was terrified that he would die young as his father had. So he exercised liked crazy, ate what he considered a good diet, etc. etc. He lived a few years longer than his father before dying of cardiac failure. I suspect his problem was that while he changed some habits, he didn't change them all. He still drank, binge smoked, worked a stressful job, had a lot of stress in his personal life, etc. He seemed to be conflicted between YOLO and taking care of himself.
Deal Fanatic
Dec 11, 2008
7314 posts
481 upvotes
Jimbobs wrote:
Oct 31st, 2017 1:37 pm
In that case, I misunderstood your previous post.

I had an older friend who was terrified that he would die young as his father had. So he exercised liked crazy, ate what he considered a good diet, etc. etc. He lived a few years longer than his father before dying of cardiac failure. I suspect his problem was that while he changed some habits, he didn't change them all. He still drank, binge smoked, worked a stressful job, had a lot of stress in his personal life, etc. He seemed to be conflicted between YOLO and taking care of himself.
Yep. Met someone at a house party and her family has high cholesterol. Ever since she went vegan a few months ago her levels have dropped 20% or so and she is not even in the danger zone but just higher than normal to begin with since her family has a history.
Deal Addict
May 14, 2009
4521 posts
244 upvotes
Jimbobs wrote:
Oct 31st, 2017 11:05 am
Thanks. Here is a more recent report that supports the energy-balance theory but questions whether "... genetic, epigenetic factors and the microbiota could influence individual responses to diet and physical activity ...". I know many people use this as an excuse.

Energy balance and obesity: what are the main drivers?
The area of obesity and the gut microbime sure is interesting. It's not an area I've read much about but I'm gaining interest.

Saw this one recently, too:

https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/29023853

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