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Filling gaps between cement blocks in driveway?

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  • Jul 15th, 2008 8:50 pm
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Deal Addict
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Jan 13, 2004
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Filling gaps between cement blocks in driveway?

I've got a driveway built out of 4'X4' cement slabs probably 4"-6" deep. Between each slab there is a gap of somewhere between an inch and 1.5 inches. It appears that when the driveway was originally built that the gaps between the slabs was filled with wood. The wood has since rotted and the gaps now provide channels for water. There is a gap between the row of slabs closest my house that is about 3" wide. This gap fills with water during heavy rain and spring runoff, which makes its way into my basement (no weeping tile, poured cement foundation). Basically, I've got a 3 inch wide 4 inch deep trench running along one entire side of my house that all of the water from my driveway is directly channeled to.

Is there any substance I could use to fill these gaps that wouldn't wash away and would also stand up to some shifting (freezing, thawing, movement of vehicle over the slabs)? I'll need 5-10 gallons at least, so it can't cost a fortune (caulking or something like it would be ideal but way too expensive). If I can fill these in the water will run away from the house and will help my drainage situation immensely.
Everything in moderation... including moderation :twisted:
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Deal Addict
Jan 4, 2007
1338 posts
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Bazooka Joe wrote:
Jun 19th, 2008 10:07 pm
I've got a driveway built out of 4'X4' cement slabs probably 4"-6" deep. Between each slab there is a gap of somewhere between an inch and 1.5 inches. It appears that when the driveway was originally built that the gaps between the slabs was filled with wood. The wood has since rotted and the gaps now provide channels for water. There is a gap between the row of slabs closest my house that is about 3" wide. This gap fills with water during heavy rain and spring runoff, which makes its way into my basement (no weeping tile, poured cement foundation). Basically, I've got a 3 inch wide 4 inch deep trench running along one entire side of my house that all of the water from my driveway is directly channeled to.

Is there any substance I could use to fill these gaps that wouldn't wash away and would also stand up to some shifting (freezing, thawing, movement of vehicle over the slabs)? I'll need 5-10 gallons at least, so it can't cost a fortune (caulking or something like it would be ideal but way too expensive). If I can fill these in the water will run away from the house and will help my drainage situation immensely.
How about crushed limestone? If you tamp it down, then wet it, it sets like concrete. It will channel most of the runoff water away from the house.
[OP]
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Jan 13, 2004
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Bump.
nornet wrote:
Jun 20th, 2008 8:36 am
How about crushed limestone? If you tamp it down, then wet it, it sets like concrete. It will channel most of the runoff water away from the house.
Limestone will erode over time, I was looking for a longer term solution.

I've been looking around and it looks like Quikrete non-shrink precision grout might be the way to go. Anyone have any experience with this?

http://www.quikrete.com/ProductLines/No ... nGrout.asp

Image
Everything in moderation... including moderation :twisted:
Sr. Member
Nov 24, 2004
944 posts
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Before you go putting grout/concrete in there...the wood filler strips may have been there to form some sort of expansion joint between the sections. If you fill it in with a non-compressive material you might end up with cracking in the concrete. I'm no expert, but it was just a thought.

CM
Deal Guru
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Nov 19, 2002
11911 posts
209 upvotes
I would not put something solid in between there, unless it's quite flexible. I think you're asking for trouble if you have no room for expansion.
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