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Finishing basement:ceiling around main duct

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  • Mar 12th, 2009 10:36 am
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[OP]
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Nov 18, 2006
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Saint-Bruno

Finishing basement:ceiling around main duct

I did a suspended ceiling in my last home and will probably go this way also with the new one.

But in this house, the heating system is forced-air and I have the main duct going crossing by basement in the middle.

I guess I don't have a choice and need to go with drywall around it. People also mentioned that I need to use metal stud for the framing around it instead of wood because of the heat/cold.

Any suggestions?
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Deal Addict
Mar 21, 2006
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Burlington, Ontario
I don't know who told you about metal studs, but I don't think that's true.

New houses are framed in wood.. Only in wood, right around the duct work :)
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[OP]
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Nov 18, 2006
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BuildingHomes wrote:
Aug 11th, 2008 9:13 am
I don't know who told you about metal studs, but I don't think that's true.
:)
The reason the were metionning metal stud (2X4) around the main duct, is the heat/cold would make the wood warp and drywall joints may crack more.
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Dec 10, 2007
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Frame it with metal studs. They're lighter on the framing and very easy to work with.
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Jul 5, 2005
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typer100 wrote:
Aug 11th, 2008 10:34 am
The reason the were metionning metal stud (2X4) around the main duct, is the heat/cold would make the wood warp and drywall joints may crack more.
I heard this as well. My basement in my new house is framed with metal studs due to the fact that the wood studs have a tendency to warp (especially in a basement).

I think you pretty much have to frame and drywall it. I plan to do the same.
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Mar 21, 2006
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typer100 wrote:
Aug 11th, 2008 10:34 am
The reason the were metionning metal stud (2X4) around the main duct, is the heat/cold would make the wood warp and drywall joints may crack more.
Perhaps, but it's not a requirement.

Drywall will dry out and shrink, so you will have cracking in some areas no matter what.

Usually I see the duct work boxed in with wood 2x2's in new homes if that's any help.
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Sr. Member
May 24, 2003
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This must be the Mike Holmes way. My basement has the exact same setup and it is boxed in using wood and drywall.

BTW, more people should be using drop ceilings in basements just for the service factor of all the lines running from the basements.
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Aug 6, 2004
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Winnipeg
I framed in my duct work 5 years ago with wood studs and I have no cracking at all. I also reinforced everything with 2.5" screws after it was up.

I could see there being a problem using cheap drywall compound. My brother used some when he created a new wall in the basement, and he's has cracks starting to appear after 2 years.
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Dec 3, 2003
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Metal studs are great, zero warping and u can cut them with snips instead of a saw. Less mess and fast. Very easy to make minor ajdustments.

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Heatware 47-0

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Dec 10, 2007
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You should only use wood if you're going to be hanging something off the studs.

Otherwise it doesn't make sense really.
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Feb 19, 2008
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I was going to go steel until I priced it out. Top U channel = $3.75, 1&5/8 steel stud = $3.32 and L angle =$3.17 per piece. Even if you use 2x4
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Mar 21, 2006
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What length 2x4 is that for $1.60? Here 8' lengths are about $2.80ish.
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Feb 19, 2008
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8 footers at HD in Winnipeg, 2X4X92&5/8 is $1.58 and 2X6X96 is $2.67
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Aug 25, 2005
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mlc2000 wrote:
Aug 12th, 2008 1:01 am
Metal studs are great, zero warping and u can cut them with snips instead of a saw. Less mess and fast. Very easy to make minor ajdustments.

Image
Nice job on the bulkhead. Did you have any areas where they spanned more than 24" and required a brace? (or stud across?)
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Dec 30, 2008
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Bradford
I'm planning on just framing the drop ceiling around the ductwork. You don't have to use drywall
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