Parenting & Family

First time expecting parents - what to prepare?

  • Last Updated:
  • Sep 28th, 2017 5:01 pm
Newbie
Jun 23, 2017
7 posts
1 upvote
Get a good stroller and a compatible bassinet,
I picked quinny stroller and its associated bassinet. It is a bit pricey but I appreciate the quality and easy to fold/unfold mechanism of the stroller and bassinet.

I know some parents would just use a car seat, however a mobile bassinet can let your baby lie down instead of having a curved spine for too long. It helps a lot if you guys want to go to a huge mall when your baby is still in early months.
Sr. Member
Aug 6, 2014
696 posts
158 upvotes
Ottawa, ON
just adding to this thread for any other expecting posters... we just had our first kid two weeks ago. it's pretty fun but i have some advice:

1 - if you're like us, you probably have a small mountain of baby clothes lying around that friends and family have given to you. grab all the booties, mittens, hats, and then any onesies that either have a zipper or buttons all the way down the front (ie you don't have to pull it over your baby's head), and put those in a separate pile. organize the onesies from smallest to biggest. that's all you're going to need (for at least the first few weeks).

2 - for the first week or two get newborn diapers that have a yellow stripe on the diaper that turns blue when the baby pees. it's super important that they pee, and it's such a small amount that it can be hard to tell if they did anything or not.

3 - we had some latching difficulties right out of the gate and had to feed the baby colostrum/breast milk out of an eye dropper until were were able to straighten things out. that means you need a breast pump and some bottles and some eye droppers, and maybe a nipple shield, and you have to sterilize all this stuff in between feedings. we were doing this by boiling them which takes about a million years to do when it's 3am and there's a crying baby nearby. then we found out about these quick clean steam bags (we use the medela ones). it's basically a heavy duty ziplock bag that sits upright and has a hole in it for steam to escape. you fill it up with a tiny bit of water, drop your stuff in it, and put it in the microwave for a minute or two. way faster/easier/saved us a bunch of time.
Deal Fanatic
Jun 24, 2006
5261 posts
659 upvotes
fisher44 wrote:
Sep 2nd, 2017 6:10 pm
just adding to this thread for any other expecting posters... we just had our first kid two weeks ago. it's pretty fun but i have some advice:

1 - if you're like us, you probably have a small mountain of baby clothes lying around that friends and family have given to you. grab all the booties, mittens, hats, and then any onesies that either have a zipper or buttons all the way down the front (ie you don't have to pull it over your baby's head), and put those in a separate pile. organize the onesies from smallest to biggest. that's all you're going to need (for at least the first few weeks).

2 - for the first week or two get newborn diapers that have a yellow stripe on the diaper that turns blue when the baby pees. it's super important that they pee, and it's such a small amount that it can be hard to tell if they did anything or not.

3 - we had some latching difficulties right out of the gate and had to feed the baby colostrum/breast milk out of an eye dropper until were were able to straighten things out. that means you need a breast pump and some bottles and some eye droppers, and maybe a nipple shield, and you have to sterilize all this stuff in between feedings. we were doing this by boiling them which takes about a million years to do when it's 3am and there's a crying baby nearby. then we found out about these quick clean steam bags (we use the medela ones). it's basically a heavy duty ziplock bag that sits upright and has a hole in it for steam to escape. you fill it up with a tiny bit of water, drop your stuff in it, and put it in the microwave for a minute or two. way faster/easier/saved us a bunch of time.
Ah yes, I remember the eye dropper thing from our first. Just note, it is very important to do this AT THE BREAST while attempting to feed. Not on dad's knee while mom is elsewhere. That way they get more and more used to feeding that way while they figure the latch out. Just drop it above their mouth on the nipple and they suck it down.
Deal Addict
Oct 29, 2010
4102 posts
554 upvotes
Reading some of the posts here makes me sweat big time...
Member
Mar 7, 2011
217 posts
130 upvotes
Ottawa
When signing up for the daycare waitlist, it asks for the name of the baby, which I don't have yet.. Can I just put some fake name and change it later?
Newbie
Nov 25, 2016
40 posts
18 upvotes
sky417 wrote:
Sep 8th, 2017 11:47 pm
When signing up for the daycare waitlist, it asks for the name of the baby, which I don't have yet.. Can I just put some fake name and change it later?
You can usually write no name yet (and no date of birth). I did that for all 3 places I registered (I was still pregnant). They are more concerned about the intended start date & the approximate age your child will be at that point. Everything else gets sorted the month prior to starting.
Deal Addict
User avatar
Aug 19, 2003
3913 posts
578 upvotes
Kingston
Macx2mommy wrote:
Jan 20th, 2017 8:50 pm
I got smart and made a whole bunch of freezer meals ahead of time. Bonus is they can go in the slow cooker so you don't even have to be awake to watch the stove.
I really want to start doing this. Do you have any favorite sites you use for recipes? Also, Do you have to thaw first then put in the slow cooker, or just throw it in frozen?
Deal Guru
Aug 2, 2001
14090 posts
4569 upvotes
Tha DraGun wrote:
Sep 24th, 2017 11:55 am
I really want to start doing this. Do you have any favorite sites you use for recipes? Also, Do you have to thaw first then put in the slow cooker, or just throw it in frozen?
Have you thought of just using a sous vide?

While I don't really like the thought of it, many people at my work use it. One of the advantages is that your meals can sit in an ice bath until they ice melts, then you remotely (via your phone) turn the unit on. This keeps the food at the proper temperature to prevent growth of bacteria.
Sr. Member
Jan 2, 2015
974 posts
364 upvotes
Tha DraGun wrote:
Sep 24th, 2017 11:55 am
I really want to start doing this. Do you have any favorite sites you use for recipes? Also, Do you have to thaw first then put in the slow cooker, or just throw it in frozen?
I started with a book called 'The big cook' and also google OAMC (once a month cooking) for ideas. It really depends on what you lie to eat.

Not all of my freezer meals go in the slow cooker, but the ones that do, can go right in if you need to. I always take it out the night before, dump the meal in slow cooker, and put the slow cooker on the fridge (my slow cooker has a removebale cock portion) and then in the morning out pull it out and turn it on. I probably don't have to do this, but on the old old slower cookers the crocks could crack if coming with frozen and hot at the same time. I think the new ones are fine to go without thawing.

I also do a lot of freezer meals in 'modules' for prep. For instance, cook 25 pounds of ground beef and onions, then freezer on bags of ziplock bags, grill up 20 chicken breasts, and cut them up, then freeze on cookie sheets. There's tones of meal you can do ahead of This me.

The other things I have been using, (it wasn't around when baby was born is those delivery meal kits. They are great on the first weeks. I can get a full meal done in 30 minutes, and some of it can even be done even earlier, so it's faster with a baby. I really liked hellofresh.ca. If you are interested let me know. I actually have referral links for $50 off.
On a 'smart' device that isn't always so smart. So please forgive the autocorrects and typos. If it brothers you, then don't read my posts, but don't waste my time correcting me. If you can get past the typos, then my posts generally have some value.
Deal Addict
Aug 2, 2017
1161 posts
117 upvotes
Logtown
No amount of books or advice can prep you for being a first time parent. You just have to experience it. The general advice that is priceless is especially concerning hand me downs.. it saved us many thousands of dollars having in-laws hand down clothes. Don't ever look a gift horse in the mouth (its like scholarship money.. who in their right mind would reject it?).. you can always donate or throw away if need be.

Overwhelmingly people learn by the second and the stress of things calms down, and the prior experience makes repeating many instances more seamless. In many ways its a microcosm of life experiences in general.

I wouldn't really to fight it.. if you wind up as stressed on child two and three as you were with child one (presuming no major health/mental issues).. at that point I'd maybe consider counseling.

I could not count on my whole familys hands how many times I had comments, regarding my daughter, of "ahh you must be a first timer". It's not a negative thing per se.. often times it means you really care a lot about your child's life and want things to go well.

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