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French Classes- George Brown Vs. UofT - Feedback please!

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  • Dec 11th, 2018 11:36 pm
[OP]
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Dec 18, 2007
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French Classes- George Brown Vs. UofT - Feedback please!

Hello all,

I"m hoping someone can give me some insight on if it's better to take French classes at George Brown or UofT as my employer is open to the possibility of paying for the classes.
I know that Alliance Francaise is an option, but it takes too long (way too many classes) and I don't think that they'll be willing to pay so much since I wouldn't be working on French accounts too often.

I'm leaning toward George Brown (I work in the financial district) which makes it easier to get to after work. I'm not a total beginner, but need to brush up and improve it.

Anyways, hoping someone can give some insight.

Thanks in advance!
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3 replies
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Nov 4, 2008
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Your first step would be to compare the course outlines of both institutions and see which one best meets your needs.

I can't speak for French classes specifically, but having been through both university and college, my inclination is towards the latter if your goal is to learn. Colleges typically have smaller class sizes and a more collaborative learning environment, whereas a university typically has larger classes and lecture style environment. College instructors, in my experience, are typically more accessible for help than university profs.
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Jul 30, 2018
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I haven't done courses at UoT or George Brown but I did my undergrad in French Studies and I've volunteered with Alliance française before. One of the biggest differences that I've seen in AF and college/university courses is the number of students. The biggest class I've seen was 6 students and I believe their max class size is 10. AF has a lot of interesting classes such as their press and lunch (talk about the news and get a catered lunch), and they also offer a Business French course that might be of interest to you. AF heavily follows the textbook for each level unless you are taking the conversation courses. A typical class would be taking up the homework given last class, and then doing 3-4 activities from the textbook, with some conversation time if there is time left over. It might also take some time to find the right prof for you.

Compared to undergraduate courses in French... my undergrad French courses usually had 15-25 people, and they were mostly young (18-22) people. At AF, there aren't really young students, but I've seen retired people, people doing it for work, or parents with kids in French Immersion. It will mostly be grammar exercises as well, but maybe not straight out of the textbook. In my classes, I had a great prof where we got to talk often but it really just depends. One positive is that you can search up professor ratings on Ratemyprof to see if it's generally going to be a good course or not. Something else to note is that almost all the teachers at AF are from France but at university/college, it's really going to differ. I really appreciated having profs from Québec and other francophone places and it's important just to hear their accents. After all, you're working in Canada and you're probably more likely to speak with a Québecois or Franco-Ontarian than a French person.

Let me know if you have any questions and I can try to answer them.
[OP]
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Dec 18, 2007
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mdlfng wrote:
Dec 7th, 2018 10:30 pm
I haven't done courses at UoT or George Brown but I did my undergrad in French Studies and I've volunteered with Alliance française before. One of the biggest differences that I've seen in AF and college/university courses is the number of students. The biggest class I've seen was 6 students and I believe their max class size is 10. AF has a lot of interesting classes such as their press and lunch (talk about the news and get a catered lunch), and they also offer a Business French course that might be of interest to you. AF heavily follows the textbook for each level unless you are taking the conversation courses. A typical class would be taking up the homework given last class, and then doing 3-4 activities from the textbook, with some conversation time if there is time left over. It might also take some time to find the right prof for you.

Compared to undergraduate courses in French... my undergrad French courses usually had 15-25 people, and they were mostly young (18-22) people. At AF, there aren't really young students, but I've seen retired people, people doing it for work, or parents with kids in French Immersion. It will mostly be grammar exercises as well, but maybe not straight out of the textbook. In my classes, I had a great prof where we got to talk often but it really just depends. One positive is that you can search up professor ratings on Ratemyprof to see if it's generally going to be a good course or not. Something else to note is that almost all the teachers at AF are from France but at university/college, it's really going to differ. I really appreciated having profs from Québec and other francophone places and it's important just to hear their accents. After all, you're working in Canada and you're probably more likely to speak with a Québecois or Franco-Ontarian than a French person.

Let me know if you have any questions and I can try to answer them.
Thanks.

I actually ended up going with George Brown instead of UofT or AF.

Oddly enough a coworker also mentioned that GB or UofT would be better than AF because I'll mainly be dealing with Quebecers once all is said and done. This was something I actually hadn't considered prior but you brought it up again.

A friend of mine who's done AF, also mentioned that they're big on French culture, which while nice is the "fluff" I need to cut out for now as I'm doing this for work and not as a hobby. I can read about France on my own anyways. I'm sure there will be some things along the way though that I'll pick up.

I did ask my boss about the possibility of taking a French business course after finishing all the GB courses, and while he had more of a "let's wait and see", he said he was open to the idea down the road.
I'm looking for a NZ Silver Fern Kiwi coin! :)

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