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  • Apr 27th, 2017 6:48 pm
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Deal Addict
Aug 26, 2004
1581 posts
14 upvotes

French Immersion

If a school has French Immersion can I opt out? Or am I required to keep my child in it? Would they be with the same kids that aren't taking french immersion?
40 replies
Sr. Member
Nov 13, 2013
592 posts
200 upvotes
You talking about Toronto Public school?
I am sure there are exceptions but generally the French stream will be stronger students with more parental involvement than the English class.
Deal Addict
Apr 9, 2010
2294 posts
509 upvotes
Montreal
CDNPatriot wrote:
Apr 1st, 2017 8:46 pm
If a school has French Immersion can I opt out? Or am I required to keep my child in it? Would they be with the same kids that aren't taking french immersion?
Why would you opt out? It's proven that bilingual kids end up being smarter.

http://www.hanen.org/Helpful-Info/Artic ... ct-fr.aspx

Also who knows what kind of job he/she will have later? Learning French is a good thing in Canada.
Deal Fanatic
Aug 26, 2002
9757 posts
2830 upvotes
Toronto, ON
As far as I know you are not automatically in FI even if the school in your district offers FI program. In most cases they also offer the regular English curriculum and your child would be enrolled in that program if he/she lives in the district. If you want your child in FI you need to register him/her in the program and depending on which school board you're in, the only grades you could enter the FI stream is SK or Grade 1.

If you're asking if you currently have a child in FI and you want to opt out of it then yes you can do that anytime. You won't be able to re-enter the FI program later on. If the school only offers FI then you will need to transfer to the regular curriculum school for your area. If your school offers both FI and regular English curriculum then you can remain in the same school.
Sr. Member
Jan 9, 2011
573 posts
271 upvotes
Vancouver
This varies widely by province, and within each province, by school district, and even within each school district, by individual school. Ask the school administration first.

@kenze, there are reasons why you may not want your child in French immersion. I could have put my kids in it but decided not to.
Deal Addict
Nov 24, 2004
3204 posts
290 upvotes
Toronto
CDNPatriot wrote:
Apr 1st, 2017 8:46 pm
If a school has French Immersion can I opt out? Or am I required to keep my child in it? Would they be with the same kids that aren't taking french immersion?
Where are you located?

In Toronto, French Immersion is something you specifically have to apply for. The "default" is the English program.
Deal Guru
Dec 31, 2005
13095 posts
631 upvotes
As others have said, typically you have to apply...otherwise it would a French School (which do exist). Often FI spots are hard to come by...

I can tell you as a hiring manager. Bilingual English/French are at a premium. Definitely a way to get your kids ahead...more so than rote mathematics.
Deal Addict
Dec 6, 2006
2052 posts
489 upvotes
nalababe wrote:
Apr 3rd, 2017 5:07 pm
As others have said, typically you have to apply...otherwise it would a French School (which do exist). Often FI spots are hard to come by...

I can tell you as a hiring manager. Bilingual English/French are at a premium. Definitely a way to get your kids ahead...more so than rote mathematics.
I have to agree and all my kids went through the French Catholic School system. After university they both got full time positions almost immediately since they are fluently bilingual.
Deal Addict
User avatar
Dec 27, 2009
2969 posts
1020 upvotes
Ottawa, ON
I would jump at the chance to have given my daughter this advantage (French immersion). If she had been raised where I now live (Ottawa) I definitely would have. Unfortunately in Victoria (where I lived until a few years ago) is only offered in a couple places.
Newbie
Jun 23, 2016
19 posts
6 upvotes
CDNPatriot wrote:
Apr 1st, 2017 8:46 pm
If a school has French Immersion can I opt out? Or am I required to keep my child in it? Would they be with the same kids that aren't taking french immersion?
Is there a reason you would do such a disservice to your child? I will never understand this line of thinking. Unless you are on the West Coast (and even then, another language is always a good thing) you are actually hurting your child's future career options by doing this. This is something I will never understand.
Deal Addict
Dec 21, 2011
2982 posts
494 upvotes
London
We are literally poaching French speakers from other departments within the same company they are so high in demand. They are fast tracked to perm positions and we are more forgiving of their results. As said before, it's a disservice to not let them take the program.
Member
Jun 26, 2007
438 posts
90 upvotes
GTA
Mindy82 wrote:
Apr 4th, 2017 8:15 am
Is there a reason you would do such a disservice to your child? I will never understand this line of thinking. Unless you are on the West Coast (and even then, another language is always a good thing) you are actually hurting your child's future career options by doing this. This is something I will never understand.
Not all kids have the right personality to succeed in FI. I've friends' kids who are in FI and those who dropped out and went back to English stream. Prob a good thing to give it a try, esp if it's in your home school.

Personally I did not put my older one in FI.
Member
Apr 29, 2006
371 posts
29 upvotes
Toronto
CDNPatriot wrote:
Apr 1st, 2017 8:46 pm
If a school has French Immersion can I opt out? Or am I required to keep my child in it? Would they be with the same kids that aren't taking french immersion?
I will say that, as a person who has gone through FI, there are kids who don't do FI at an FI school. However, their general classes will be in French.

Through elementary, from my experience, everything was in French with the same group of kids and then part of the day is spent in English.
During recess/lunch, they are free to do whatever they wish.
During high school, I was required to take 10-12 credit courses specifically taught in French to maintain FI status but otherwise, some did opt out of it.
During spares/lunch/other courses, I was free to socialise/mingle/whatever with French/Non-French speakers alike.

Some of the posters are correct, generally, you would "apply" for FI and have an edge if a parent/close relative were French-speaking or once in FI I believe so the default is the English/regular program.
Sr. Member
Jan 9, 2011
573 posts
271 upvotes
Vancouver
snow00774 wrote:
Apr 4th, 2017 8:28 am
We are literally poaching French speakers from other departments within the same company they are so high in demand. They are fast tracked to perm positions and we are more forgiving of their results. As said before, it's a disservice to not let them take the program.
This is one reason why you may choose to not put your kid in French immersion. In the English program, there is a glut of teachers and school boards can be much choosier about who they hire. When the hiring procedure for FI teachers is "You can speak French? You're hired", are you sure your kid is really getting a better teacher, and thus a better education?
Sr. Member
Nov 13, 2013
592 posts
200 upvotes
Kiraly wrote:
Apr 17th, 2017 12:57 pm
This is one reason why you may choose to not put your kid in French immersion. In the English program, there is a glut of teachers and school boards can be much choosier about who they hire. When the hiring procedure for FI teachers is "You can speak French? You're hired", are you sure your kid is really getting a better teacher, and thus a better education?
Sorry but choosy has nothing to do with it. It works by seniority.
Granted English stream teachers will have more experience but most are well into,their forties and fifties. You could argue a fresh twenty something will have more energy. Either way they will have to be accredited to teach in public school.

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