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Fresh Water Tropical Fish Aquarium Question

  • Last Updated:
  • Apr 4th, 2017 5:36 pm
[OP]
Deal Addict
Jun 23, 2010
1430 posts
181 upvotes
Markham

Fresh Water Tropical Fish Aquarium Question

Not sure if this is pet related, but tough call where I should slot it.
I want to get a 60 gallon fish tank, for our condo. Thing is, I need to place it in the immediate seating area, or nobody will never be able to see it. Doesn't make much sense putting it anywhere else, or even buying it if I can't sit and watch it.
It's key that the filtration system be quiet as possible. Can anybody recommend , just for starters, what filtration method would probably be the best to focus on? Perhaps an undergravel because the pumping action is not as vigorous as one that hangs on the back?
Any thought would be much appreciated.
18 replies
Deal Addict
Apr 11, 2006
4524 posts
810 upvotes
Mississauga
The ones that hang on the back are only noisy if the water level is lower. Naturally, when the water level is lower, then the water coming out of the filter will create more noise as it falls back into the aquarium. When you fill the aquarium up so that the water level is really high, then the water coming out of the filter doesn't travel as much and will naturally be more quiet.
[OP]
Deal Addict
Jun 23, 2010
1430 posts
181 upvotes
Markham
I see....lessen the distance of travel...thanks...
Sr. Member
Aug 16, 2011
795 posts
211 upvotes
Kitchener
look into canister filters and put the outflow below the water line.
[OP]
Deal Addict
Jun 23, 2010
1430 posts
181 upvotes
Markham
starrlamia wrote:
Feb 27th, 2017 10:02 am
look into canister filters and put the outflow below the water line.
Thanks, canister is definitely a go. I did some more reading last night, and it seems I need some type of water surface agitation in order to aerate the water with O2 for the fish. If not I may need an air pump with an air stone. My worry now is the air pump may make the noise I'm trying to avoid. I saw some thing called a power head that may be quieter and accomplish that desire.
Thanks everyone
Sr. Member
Jan 16, 2007
565 posts
89 upvotes
Toronto
PCUSER wrote:
Feb 27th, 2017 10:42 am
Thanks, canister is definitely a go. I did some more reading last night, and it seems I need some type of water surface agitation in order to aerate the water with O2 for the fish. If not I may need an air pump with an air stone. My worry now is the air pump may make the noise I'm trying to avoid. I saw some thing called a power head that may be quieter and accomplish that desire.
Thanks everyone
Don't need extra water surface agitation or air pumps when using appropriate sized canister filter. If not enough O2, just move the exhaust slightly above the water line.
Air pumps are the loudest things you can get. I put then on top of sponges and still the vibrating noises from the pumps drives me insane. Bubbles are silent compared to the pump itself. Stay far away.
[OP]
Deal Addict
Jun 23, 2010
1430 posts
181 upvotes
Markham
NubNub wrote:
Feb 27th, 2017 4:32 pm
Don't need extra water surface agitation or air pumps when using appropriate sized canister filter. If not enough O2, just move the exhaust slightly above the water line.
Air pumps are the loudest things you can get. I put then on top of sponges and still the vibrating noises from the pumps drives me insane. Bubbles are silent compared to the pump itself. Stay far away.
Right on..good to know...more reading today, suggests that if your low on O2, then the fish will give you an indicator and start gulping away at the surface.
I'm starting off with baby steps, let the water stabilize for 3 weeks, then introduce fish slowly over the following months. I found a great book that has lots of species of fish listed, their grown lengths, and their compatibility with others. Definitely always going to get them pairs, and leaning towards smaller varieties with places to hide like live plants. I want a Utopia for them. Winking Face
Sr. Member
Aug 16, 2011
795 posts
211 upvotes
Kitchener
I came here just to suggest some live plants, they help with oxygenation. This calc can give you some ideas on stocking, it's not 100% accurate but it can give you an idea, it's also a bit conservative http://aqadvisor.com/
khuli loaches are a lot of fun, my favourite substrate dwelling fish!
Sr. Member
Jan 16, 2007
565 posts
89 upvotes
Toronto
If you're a beginner, I'd stay away from live plants. They need the right Lighting/CO2/Fertilizer cocktail to survive in a fish tank.

When the plants die, and they will die, it will upset the balance of the tank by decaying. Decaying plants lead to algae blooms. Just buy fake/plastic stuff for now.

When I was a kid with a fish bowl and a huge Goldfish with no pump, yeah the poor guy was literally suffocating.

I've never ever had a problem with O2 before in a real tank with any kind of filter/air pump.
[OP]
Deal Addict
Jun 23, 2010
1430 posts
181 upvotes
Markham
Great info guys, thanks. You tube also had one guy that had a CO2 canister slowly bubbling for his plants, and I saw the 'fertilizer' he laid out on the gravel B4 planting. Everything will definitely be baby steps for me. I got the tank and stand here at home now. Going away on vacation at the end of the week, so on the floor it will remain until I get back.
Thnx again
Sr. Member
Jan 16, 2007
565 posts
89 upvotes
Toronto
FYI, you don't add ferts to the gravel, It would instantaneously dissolve in the water and BAM, dead fish and algae blooms. You need to add the correct dosage at the right intervals like medicine prescription from your Doctor.

I have one of those CO2 tanks and regulator to dispense Co2 Bubbles on a regular basis. Lighting is like a Ganja grow OP. Ferts, is in liquid form that I dispense with a syringe in drops.

Then comes the almost daily grooming of the plants and dealing with the weeds/algae. It's like as much work as those guys that fuss over a perfect green lawns in the front yard.
[OP]
Deal Addict
Jun 23, 2010
1430 posts
181 upvotes
Markham
NubNub wrote:
Mar 1st, 2017 2:20 pm
FYI, you don't add ferts to the gravel, It would instantaneously dissolve in the water and BAM, dead fish and algae blooms. You need to add the correct dosage at the right intervals like medicine prescription from your Doctor.

I have one of those CO2 tanks and regulator to dispense Co2 Bubbles on a regular basis. Lighting is like a Ganja grow OP. Ferts, is in liquid form that I dispense with a syringe in drops.

Then comes the almost daily grooming of the plants and dealing with the weeds/algae. It's like as much work as those guys that fuss over a perfect green lawns in the front yard.
Man, now I'm intimidated, but haven't lost the interest.
Ty
Sr. Member
Jan 16, 2007
565 posts
89 upvotes
Toronto
Don't be intimated, just stay away from live plants until you've had some experience with fish only. You can decorate however you like.
Live plants is the next level up. Salt water is the final step. Each step up basically raises the amount of work/knowledge and dollar requirement on your part.
Baby steps.
Deal Addict
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Sep 10, 2005
3017 posts
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GTA
I disagree about staying away from live plants. Having a good substrate​ and good lighting is already good enough for a decent low tech tank. There are lots of beginner plants like anubias, crypts, mosses, water sprite, wisteria, etc that will do just fine that environment.

Obviously, they will do even better with co2 and more experience but plants like those can still do pretty well.
Deal Addict
Apr 11, 2006
4524 posts
810 upvotes
Mississauga
If your aquarium is in a fairly bright spot, you can get the green water effect so easily from food remnants, etc.

When people run into that issue, they usually have a heck of a time trying to get the water to become colourless again - sometimes people try purchasing those water additives from the pet store that is said to help rid the green water (which proves to be useless).

That's where live plants come in handy. When you throw a live plant in an aquarium of green water, it will clear within a day or two (given a reasonable proportion of water to plant ratio). I ran plants in my aquarium with fish and I was, what I would call a casual hobbyist. Meaning, I didn't do regular (actually, I have never done in my life) chemical measurements to ensure balanced pH and all that jazz nor did I use plant food or co2 or anything. But my tank was pristine, because when you have a good balance of fish for the plants, enough co2 is produced for the plants to thrive.

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