Home & Garden

fridge stopped working, worth repairing?

  • Last Updated:
  • Jan 11th, 2019 6:38 pm
Tags:
Deal Addict
User avatar
Oct 12, 2007
3815 posts
1112 upvotes
Ottawa
Yes but a wide adoption of energy efficient appliances can lead to lower water and electricity consumption that can forestall or reduce the investment in expanding or replacing utilities infrastructure.

I had a plastic fan blade break off of my 70s era upright freezer. Something had fallen behind the freezer and the blade collided with the object and broke. I glued it back on using PVC glue and that fan lasted another decade before we finally sold that freezer for what we had paid for it 20 years earlier.
Member
Apr 19, 2018
349 posts
259 upvotes
Kitchener/Waterloo, …
A wide adoption of expensive and disposable appliances accelerates the march towards reaching landfill capacity. It is nothing but a shell game where the consumer is convinced to fork out a lot more for appliances and much more often, for almost no energy savings and yet still ever accelerating increases in energy prices.

I hate when politicians use the word "investment" to describe expenditures. An investment preserves the capital and produces a steady annual return. Government expenses produce a benefit for as long as the infrastructure they built lasts, but these do degrade over time and lose all their value.

If we used a politician's logic, then we would all "invest" in new cars or anything else that wears out over time and has to be replaced.

Right now in Ontario, we have a large excess of generating capacity, mostly as a result of the loss of much of the manufacturing sector. It just sits there and produces no revenue, but we all still pay for that idle capacity in our rates. That isn't an investment, that is "dead money". In the meantime, we pay Americans to take excess wind energy off our hands because the contract has us buying it whether we need it or not, and the power has to go somewhere. That tidbit is covered in our "global adjustment" charge.

Frankly, companies like Samsung should not be allowed to sell their unreliable wares in Canada.
Deal Guru
Jan 27, 2006
11341 posts
4631 upvotes
Vancouver, BC
Enlgma wrote:
Jan 1st, 2019 5:51 pm
A wide adoption of expensive and disposable appliances accelerates the march towards reaching landfill capacity. It is nothing but a shell game where the consumer is convinced to fork out a lot more for appliances and much more often, for almost no energy savings and yet still ever accelerating increases in energy prices.

I hate when politicians use the word "investment" to describe expenditures. An investment preserves the capital and produces a steady annual return. Government expenses produce a benefit for as long as the infrastructure they built lasts, but these do degrade over time and lose all their value.

If we used a politician's logic, then we would all "invest" in new cars or anything else that wears out over time and has to be replaced.

Right now in Ontario, we have a large excess of generating capacity, mostly as a result of the loss of much of the manufacturing sector. It just sits there and produces no revenue, but we all still pay for that idle capacity in our rates. That isn't an investment, that is "dead money". In the meantime, we pay Americans to take excess wind energy off our hands because the contract has us buying it whether we need it or not, and the power has to go somewhere. That tidbit is covered in our "global adjustment" charge.

Frankly, companies like Samsung should not be allowed to sell their unreliable wares in Canada.
It's not just politicians using the word 'invest' or 'investment' but you see it all over RFD as some way to justify spending money on something which is generally silly - ie investing in a new smartphone is like saying that you are investing in a ham sandwich. To me, if you invest in something, you expect a return greater than your investment.

I won't say that Ontario has just excess generating capacity... Ontario has an excess of EXPENSIVE generating capacity. If the power was made cheap enough in the first place, there would be no problems selling it to someone. BC has a similar issue with many of the 'run-of-river' small-scale generating plants which our previous, previous (think McGuinty type stupidity) premier decided to out-green the NDP. Many of those contracts were uneconomic without heavy subsidies.
Deal Addict
Jul 7, 2017
2177 posts
817 upvotes
SW corner of the cou…
craftsman wrote:
Jan 1st, 2019 6:15 pm
I won't say that Ontario has just excess generating capacity... Ontario has an excess of EXPENSIVE generating capacity. If the power was made cheap enough in the first place, there would be no problems selling it to someone. BC has a similar issue with many of the 'run-of-river' small-scale generating plants which our previous, previous (think McGuinty type stupidity) premier decided to out-green the NDP. Many of those contracts were uneconomic without heavy subsidies.
I'm sure it has made and continues to make a lot of money for supporters of the B.C. Liberal (right-wing) party though. The price paid to these producers is a lot more (might even be multiples) than what's charged at the highest tier to residential consumers (~12.5¢/KWh).
Almost too cheap to shop through RFD
Deal Guru
Jan 27, 2006
11341 posts
4631 upvotes
Vancouver, BC
thriftshopper wrote:
Jan 1st, 2019 6:37 pm
I'm sure it has made and continues to make a lot of money for supporters of the B.C. Liberal (right-wing) party though. The price paid to these producers is a lot more (might even be multiples) than what's charged at the highest tier to residential consumers (~12.5¢/KWh).
Yes but I don't remember anyone from the NDP nor the green side of things complain about those policies either so I suspect that they too made and continues to make a lot of money off of the 'deals'.
Deal Addict
Jul 7, 2017
2177 posts
817 upvotes
SW corner of the cou…
craftsman wrote:
Jan 1st, 2019 7:28 pm
Yes but I don't remember anyone from the NDP nor the green side of things complain about those policies either so I suspect that they too made and continues to make a lot of money off of the 'deals'.
In opposition, the NDP frequently complained that B.C. Hydro had been forced by government to enter into deals in which it was contractually obligated to buy unnecessarily expensive privately generated power that it did not need.
https://www.timescolonist.com/news/loca ... 1.23202127

Back in 2004, the opposition only had 2 seats while the governing provincial Liberals had all the rest.
Almost too cheap to shop through RFD
Deal Guru
Jan 27, 2006
11341 posts
4631 upvotes
Vancouver, BC
thriftshopper wrote:
Jan 1st, 2019 7:48 pm
https://www.timescolonist.com/news/loca ... 1.23202127

Back in 2004, the opposition only had 2 seats while the governing provincial Liberals had all the rest.
Yes, but two seats doesn't mean that you have to be silent on the issue. But I don't think they could have complained too strongly without having an issue with a large section of their base as no-one bad mouthed anything that was greenwashed - doing so would have resulted in a political price to be paid.

But times were different then, I think it had more to do with the times those policies were enacted as everyone was pointing to electricity as the future with alternative fuel vehicles like hydrogen/fuel cell/electric cars being in widespread use and that ratepayers won't mind paying a few cents more per KWh if that meant lower impact ways for generating that electricity. After all, that time period was marked by BIG subsidies worldwide for any type of green infrastructure whether or not they were (or will be) economic or not made no difference. Just be thankful that no-one built that hydrogen highway from LA to Vancouver...
[OP]
Sr. Member
Aug 29, 2005
562 posts
89 upvotes
Update:
A repairman came one week ago. He said Freon was gone. He charged Freon. The fridge started working. Asked him how long it can last. He said no idea, could be months or couple of years. He said it was impossible to find out where the leak is.

One week after, today, we found the food in the freezer melted. It seems that Freon is almost gone after one week.

My wife called the repairman. He would come tomorrow.But I don't think it makes sense because this guy said it is impossible to find out the leak. Nobody would pay more than 100 bucks for charging freon every week!

I googled and some people said freon leak is an easy and quick repair. Is it true? If yes, I might call another repairman to fix the freon leak instead of buying a new fridge.
Deal Expert
Aug 22, 2011
28843 posts
14654 upvotes
Ottawa
supermike wrote:
Jan 11th, 2019 11:14 am
Update:
A repairman came one week ago. He said Freon was gone. He charged Freon. The fridge started working. Asked him how long it can last. He said no idea, could be months or couple of years. He said it was impossible to find out where the leak is.

One week after, today, we found the food in the freezer melted. It seems that Freon is almost gone after one week.

My wife called the repairman. He would come tomorrow.But I don't think it makes sense because this guy said it is impossible to find out the leak. Nobody would pay more than 100 bucks for charging freon every week!

I googled and some people said freon leak is an easy and quick repair. Is it true? If yes, I might call another repairman to fix the freon leak instead of buying a new fridge.
Just buy a new fridge and have some piece of mind.
[OP]
Sr. Member
Aug 29, 2005
562 posts
89 upvotes
vkizzle wrote:
Jan 11th, 2019 12:58 pm
Just buy a new fridge and have some piece of mind.
This type of 36" french door fridges are expensive. I saw an LG for 1900 something during the holiday. The price was chagned to 2500 something today! 600 more in 2 weeks. It wasn't on sale (at least none of the stores said it was on sale, costco, homedept,bestbuy...), so I supposed it was the regular price. Does this mean the price of fridges just increased 20% after new year? oh boy, this is scary!
Deal Expert
Aug 22, 2011
28843 posts
14654 upvotes
Ottawa
supermike wrote:
Jan 11th, 2019 1:14 pm
This type of 36" french door fridges are expensive. I saw an LG for 1900 something during the holiday. The price was chagned to 2500 something today! 600 more in 2 weeks. It wasn't on sale (at least none of the stores said it was on sale, costco, homedept,bestbuy...), so I supposed it was the regular price. Does this mean the price of fridges just increased 20% after new year? oh boy, this is scary!
You can thank Trump for that!
Deal Guru
Jan 27, 2006
11341 posts
4631 upvotes
Vancouver, BC
supermike wrote:
Jan 11th, 2019 11:14 am
Update:
A repairman came one week ago. He said Freon was gone. He charged Freon. The fridge started working. Asked him how long it can last. He said no idea, could be months or couple of years. He said it was impossible to find out where the leak is.

One week after, today, we found the food in the freezer melted. It seems that Freon is almost gone after one week.

My wife called the repairman. He would come tomorrow.But I don't think it makes sense because this guy said it is impossible to find out the leak. Nobody would pay more than 100 bucks for charging freon every week!

I googled and some people said freon leak is an easy and quick repair. Is it true? If yes, I might call another repairman to fix the freon leak instead of buying a new fridge.
Yes to a certain extent. The repairman can put a dye-based freon into the system and see where the dye leaks out. Depending on the set up of the freezer, you may or may not be able to see where it leaks out as it may be one of the cooling coils embedded in the walls of the freezer. If you are lucky, the leak is in a visible spot. Auto mechanics do this all of the time.
Deal Guru
Jan 27, 2006
11341 posts
4631 upvotes
Vancouver, BC
vkizzle wrote:
Jan 11th, 2019 12:58 pm
Just buy a new fridge and have some piece of mind.
A new fridge won't necessarily give you peace of mind... they can still break but at least it will be covered by a warranty. Of course, you would have paid for that warranty with the cost of the new fridge.
Deal Expert
Aug 22, 2011
28843 posts
14654 upvotes
Ottawa
craftsman wrote:
Jan 11th, 2019 2:00 pm
A new fridge won't necessarily give you peace of mind... they can still break but at least it will be covered by a warranty. Of course, you would have paid for that warranty with the cost of the new fridge.
It does for me.
I mean, we don't buy new products and worry that it will brake the next day.
Deal Addict
User avatar
Oct 9, 2010
2389 posts
675 upvotes
Windsor
supermike wrote:
Jan 11th, 2019 11:14 am
Update:
A repairman came one week ago. He said Freon was gone. He charged Freon. The fridge started working. Asked him how long it can last. He said no idea, could be months or couple of years. He said it was impossible to find out where the leak is.

One week after, today, we found the food in the freezer melted. It seems that Freon is almost gone after one week.

My wife called the repairman. He would come tomorrow.But I don't think it makes sense because this guy said it is impossible to find out the leak. Nobody would pay more than 100 bucks for charging freon every week!

I googled and some people said freon leak is an easy and quick repair. Is it true? If yes, I might call another repairman to fix the freon leak instead of buying a new fridge.
Your repairman screwed you; finding a freon leak is potentially easy in a fridge ... I used to hunt them down in cars. At minimum, he should have pressure tested the system, which would have quickly shown him there was a leak (especially since it is leaking so quickly), even if he had no idea where it is.

I'd call in another guy, armed with the knowledge that your fridge IS leaking. Maybe if you're lucky, the previous guy put dye in there, and it will be more obvious where the problem is.
One who is offended by truth, has no place among those who seek wisdom.

Top