Home & Garden

Furnace from Home Depot and Costco

  • Last Updated:
  • Jul 21st, 2016 9:48 pm
Tags:
Newbie
Apr 21, 2011
16 posts
BRAMPTON

Furnace from Home Depot and Costco

Hi
I am planning to change 21 years old Lennox furnace (90,000 BTU) and an old air con with a Trane. One of the contractors who installs for Home Depot in Brampton visited and quote ($5881) including all the rebates and taxes with 10 years parts and labour warranty on both units and lifetime limited warranty on the heat exchanger with registration within 60 days (the exact duration is not documented in the brochure). Also includes removal of old furnace and air con. The installation will take one day.

I have a 2500sq.ft area with a finished basement.

HOME DEPOT
The guy recommended Trane model (both furnace and air con).
1. Furnace is XV95 (95% efficient), 80,000 BTU; furnace cost is $3700
2. 5-inch media filter
3. 1600 CFM motor
4. XR15 (air con) with SEER of upto 17.0, 2.5 ton; air con cost is $2800

====================================
COSTCO
I also had a quote from Costco (only furnace). They are selling Lennox. They only provide 10 years on furnace parts, 20 years heat exchanger with 1 year labor service. After the first year, if you want to have a labor then you have to pay $35/month to have a free labor with one service/year.

The guy recommended ML193 model (furnace model)
1. Furnace is ML193 (93% efficient), 70,000BTU; furnace cost is $3099
2. 5-inch media filter (extra $300)

The total cost $3881 (includes all the rebates and taxes plus filter cost).

In addition, I am getting $400 cash card and $82 for Executive Member. This is not included in the price mentioned above.

My worries are that:
1. Do you think this cost is good for the particulars mentioned above?
2. Is there any thing I am missing which is important?
3. My current Lennox old furnace is working well. Should I really switch to high efficiency furnace and will this make a significant impact or not?
4. The heat exchanger is 92% or 95% efficient. What is the reliability of this efficiency over the period of time (lets say 5-10 years)? Does this efficiency change with time.

I do not find any logical explanation which company/model should I use.

I would appreciate if you put some thoughts which may help other homeowners as well.

Dan
17 replies
Deal Fanatic
User avatar
Jun 7, 2001
6530 posts
617 upvotes
Alberta
Do you know or can you find out the efficiency of your existing furnace?

Dave
[OP]
Newbie
Apr 21, 2011
16 posts
BRAMPTON
DavidY wrote:
Oct 1st, 2011 12:31 pm
Do you know or can you find out the efficiency of your existing furnace?

Dave

I dont know but its a builder installed (1991) Lennox furnace.
Deal Fanatic
User avatar
Jun 7, 2001
6530 posts
617 upvotes
Alberta
dkhan100 wrote:
Oct 1st, 2011 11:25 pm
I dont know but its a builder installed (1991) Lennox furnace.

If there is a label indicating any model number or the like, I would do a search for the efficiency. Is there a reason why you need to replace the furnace now? All new furnaces now are at least 80% efficient....many in the 90% and higher.

Dave
Deal Addict
Jan 19, 2011
2148 posts
399 upvotes
Just inside your furnace's removeable cover, you should find a metal serial number and information plate, which will have the furnaces input and output BTU printed on it: Divide one into the other to get your furnaces actual efficiency. My old one was 130 thou in, 122 thou out, which I think worked out to 93% efficiency (too lazy to click on the calculator right now!).

If your furnace is working fine, I would not bother replacing it, regardless of the grants offered. You have to look carefully at each grant amout, as they are all different based on what furnace you are going to, versus what you are replaceing. I went to a high efficiency (95%+) two stage variable speed ECM DC fan blower 90 thousand BTU in, which at the time offered $790 in provincial eco rebate, plus $150 from OPG, plus $150 from Lennox, but $300 in testing fees were not covered.

Worthwhile in our case, because our furnace had died (shorted / crapped out controller board) and was installed in 1987, so we had no choice really but to replace with new.
"The truth is incontrovertible, malice may attack it, ignorance may deride it, but in the end; there it is."
Just a guy who dabbles in lots of stuff learning along the way. I do have opinions, and readily share them!
Deal Fanatic
Mar 21, 2002
5720 posts
508 upvotes
fieldhousehandyman wrote:
Oct 2nd, 2011 8:02 am
Just inside your furnace's removeable cover, you should find a metal serial number and information plate, which will have the furnaces input and output BTU printed on it: Divide one into the other to get your furnaces actual efficiency. My old one was 130 thou in, 122 thou out, which I think worked out to 93% efficiency (too lazy to click on the calculator right now!).
Yeah that's how I calculated it for my really old furnace (about 75% - :cry :) . Some provinces set standards for furnace efficiency. eg in Manitoba where I am I believe the new building code requires minimum 94% on new construction homes.
Deal Fanatic
User avatar
Jun 7, 2001
6530 posts
617 upvotes
Alberta
woof wrote:
Oct 2nd, 2011 11:10 am
Yeah that's how I calculated it for my really old furnace (about 75% - :cry :) . Some provinces set standards for furnace efficiency. eg in Manitoba where I am I believe the new building code requires minimum 94% on new construction homes.
Actually 75% isn't too bad considering it's an older furnace. Mine is only 4 years old and is only 80%...was installed by the previous homeowner....these are no longer sold (except for existing inventory) in BC....primarily aimed towards rental units I guess. Now I am stuck with it. :(

Dave
Deal Addict
Jan 19, 2011
2148 posts
399 upvotes
DavidY wrote:
Oct 2nd, 2011 12:12 pm
Actually 75% isn't too bad considering it's an older furnace. Mine is only 4 years old and is only 80%...was installed by the previous homeowner....these are no longer sold (except for existing inventory) in BC....primarily aimed towards rental units I guess. Now I am stuck with it. :(

Dave

There is good news though, in 19 to 24 years, it will breakdown, be too expensive to justify repairing, and then you can probably get an ultra high efficiency condensing gas furnace that is close to 99.9 percent efficient, and the exhaust gases will pass through a special filter that converts into a few kilograms of high quality fertilizer every few months!
"The truth is incontrovertible, malice may attack it, ignorance may deride it, but in the end; there it is."
Just a guy who dabbles in lots of stuff learning along the way. I do have opinions, and readily share them!
Deal Addict
Nov 12, 2006
2968 posts
75 upvotes
dkhan100 wrote:
Oct 1st, 2011 12:01 pm

My worries are that:
1. Do you think this cost is good for the particulars mentioned above?
2. Is there any thing I am missing which is important?
3. My current Lennox old furnace is working well. Should I really switch to high efficiency furnace and will this make a significant impact or not?
4. The heat exchanger is 92% or 95% efficient. What is the reliability of this efficiency over the period of time (lets say 5-10 years)? Does this efficiency change with time.

I do not find any logical explanation which company/model should I use.

I would appreciate if you put some thoughts which may help other homeowners as well.



Dan
1) Depends on who installs it. There are a lot of bad dealers out there. In my area I could not find a good Lennox dealer but could find good/excellent Trane, Tempstar and Carrier installers. I did find a good lennox dealer in Toronto (45 minutes away).

2) Yes....get a few quotes from a few people and find out what your neighbors have for the same house. Dealers will sell you what they have. I bet Lennox does not sell an 80K and Trane does not sell a 70K. I got 2 guys try to sell me the wrong size. one guy was 60K another was 120K (WTF? my old one was 100K. this joker based it on the main duct size) I needed 80K and it works great.

The installer makes a world of difference.

***get a 5" or so furnace filter box and check out its reviews****** They are well worth it and do a far superior job than the 2.5"

3) Maybe....there are a few things. If your furnace is not a 2 stage heater now then replacing it will make a huge difference to your comfort level. The air circulation is much better and temperatures more even. As for savings...you did not say what you have now.

4)IDK....I think it does but someone else has to answer this.


Oh yeah....$5880 sounds very high when all the rebates are counted, but then again, you did not say how much the rebates were. ~$3400 should be the before rebate price from an installer with a big time rep.
Sr. Member
User avatar
Jan 15, 2008
856 posts
49 upvotes
Oil country
I've been researching those same options the OP has.
A rep for Lenox at Costco is coming by on Monday, and Im waiting for a call back from someone at home depot. Apparently I just missed HD's $1200 promo (ended yesterday). Just my luck. Ill go to HD today to see if i can speak with someone in person about what they offer.

Im in a small 2 story townhome about 1000sq feet + finished basement. My existing 91% HE furnace crapped out and im trying to decide to buy a new one or replace the bad secondary heat exchanger under warranty and hope other stuff doesn't break on it later on. Labour ive been quoted between $600-$1400...

Would a new furnace solve the cold room issues i have in our second floor? I just used to think it was bad insulation and poor builder's grade windows...but maybe our furnace couldn't push the hot are up there? The furnace rating is 40K BTU. House is about 12 years old.
Member
Mar 3, 2009
423 posts
22 upvotes
"Take Barb and Randy Ross, who spent five weeks chasing a missing rebate. After installing a $7,105 Trane furnace last April, they were supposed to get 10 per cent back in the form of a Home Depot gift card"

Ellen Roseman recently wrote an article about how painful it was getting the HD rebate.

Hopefully HD learned a lesson.

http://www.moneyville.ca/article/105879 ... 710-rebate
Sr. Member
User avatar
Feb 25, 2010
686 posts
20 upvotes
I think there are supposed to be some new programs coming out (we've just had two elections and the budgets should announce some new incentives, especially with a minority prov government) so waiting, if it's an option, might be a good thing.

Mid-efficiency furnaces cannot be replaced. There were phased out at the end of 2009 and existing stock would have been used by now. Which means you may also have large venting costs since you can't go up the chimney anymore.

The installer is the more important decision than the furnace. You want someone who knows what they are doing and will be there for you in an emergency. You are buying the relationship, experience and knowledge. Price should not be the deciding factor.
Newbie
Oct 15, 2011
2 posts
SCARBOROUGH
Lennox used to be good, but not now, just had recall recently, also comsumer report doesn't recommond, you should go with Trane or American standard (they are same), most quiet and reliable, price could be close or lessm typically American standard.
Member
Dec 31, 2006
386 posts
11 upvotes
Greater Tarana Area
goldapple wrote:
Oct 16th, 2011 12:41 am
Lennox used to be good, but not now, just had recall recently, also comsumer report doesn't recommond, you should go with Trane or American standard (they are same), most quiet and reliable, price could be close or lessm typically American standard.

What recall? The only ref I find is for a "Pulse" model installed 1982-1989...
Up to 100% OFF
Newbie
Oct 15, 2011
2 posts
SCARBOROUGH
mason wrote:
Oct 16th, 2011 10:26 am
What recall? The only ref I find is for a "Pulse" model installed 1982-1989...
Security problems on all model AC's made between july 1, 2010, sep 16, 2010. They mention product hold from dealer side. But units already installed are not subject to product hold.
× < >

Top