PC & Video Games

Gaming console for my son

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  • Jan 16th, 2020 9:54 pm
Deal Fanatic
Oct 23, 2004
7432 posts
4033 upvotes
Toronto
imothum wrote: Wonder if anyone can comment on effect of endlessly entertaining kids especially with electronic gizmos on their outcomes in adult life. Any now-adult kid gamers input is appreciated.
I directly attribute my decision to study and start a career in IT to my parents allowing me to tinker with computer gaming from a very young age. I had my first PC and taught myself DOS and Windows 3.1 for gaming in the early 90s before I was even 10 years old and was installing my own upgrades and building systems from scratch by my early teens. I've been my family and friends go to "computer guy" for as long as I can remember so getting into IT was a no brainier for me and I've done well with it.

That said, things are a bit different with the kind of console gaming that's currently popular as everything is spoon fed with nothing to learn, even modern PC gaming is streamlined and simplified from what it was when I was growing up with it however it can still be combined as an educational and productivity tool as opposed to a consoles that they just turn on to launch games.
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Mar 18, 2006
2441 posts
376 upvotes
Kitchener, ON
ReeGee wrote: I directly attribute my decision to study and start a career in IT to my parents allowing me to tinker with computer gaming from a very young age. I had my first PC and taught myself DOS and Windows 3.1 for gaming in the early 90s before I was even 10 years old and was installing my own upgrades and building systems from scratch by my early teens. I've been my family and friends go to "computer guy" for as long as I can remember so getting into IT was a no brainier for me and I've done well with it.

That said, things are a bit different with the kind of console gaming that's currently popular as everything is spoon fed with nothing to learn, even modern PC gaming is streamlined and simplified from what it was when I was growing up with it however it can still be combined as an educational and productivity tool as opposed to a consoles that they just turn on to launch games.
I feel like we are the same person haha. I went through the same path. I am focusing more on teaching my son the value of what he gets from these games and 'control' of his 'addiction' to want to play all the time etc. by focusing him on other activities. He plays a lot of sports as well, so we make sure to engage him in those as well and keep the happiness rolling on all fronts. He comes back home from hockey or whatever sport and has some small downtime 30 min to an hour on games. It's good for the brain to 'rest'.
Deal Addict
Nov 29, 2011
1830 posts
503 upvotes
Toronto
imothum wrote: Wonder if anyone can comment on effect of endlessly entertaining kids especially with electronic gizmos on their outcomes in adult life. Any now-adult kid gamers input is appreciated.
A few folks talked about career prospects. I want to share another perspective.

There are some studies that link extensive screen time to anxiety and depression. Video games should not be used as a crutch for social anxiety, loneliness, chronic depression etc.

On the other hand, gaming does have a social element and can bring together people. The problem solving nature of interactive entertainment could be more rewarding than watching content.

The majority of millennials grew up with TV, computers and video games - and are now productive folks in adulthood. Today's kids should be just fine.

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