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Generation Jobless

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May 4, 2010
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Kaiu wrote:
Feb 1st, 2013 2:23 pm
TBH, I personally find it offensive when people go around stating, "Generation Jobless" lol...

Everyone I know in their 20s have decent jobs, a few are not successful as usual and are having difficulty finding jobs.
So everyone you know automatically expands to include everyone in the 20 - 30 year old age group?
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C_C wrote:
Feb 1st, 2013 2:29 pm
So everyone you know automatically expands to include everyone in the 20 - 30 year old age group?
Nope, unlike you guys...
I'm saying not everyone in the 20-30 year old group is as you guys try to claim it is.

As mentioned earlier in this thread, youth unemployment is actually on a shrinking trend. It is normal to start out at around $30,000-60,000/year (Some make even ~$26,000 but I would say that is more for jobs that require only high school or possibly some college level skills) just out of school with minimal experience. How much you make after that first couple of years really dictates how much you're worth to your employer.

If you're really not happy with your pay, find a better job, or make your own (with the right skills, will, and ability, many are very successful this way too)

Some are more successful than I could have imagined, and yes I DO get jealous, but I don't whine or complain about it.
We all have the capability imo, just whether how far (risk/effort) you're willing to go to achieve it.*
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Nov 22, 2004
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C_C, while i understand that it's an employer's market out there and jobs in the entry level positions are fewer and less paid than before, i just hope that you aren't putting yourself among the victims of no/under-employment. you've said so yourself in another thread that you got a ton of interviews...so that at least means that the jobs were out there that you might have qualified for (barring the possible few circumstances where the eliminate the position afterwards altogether or something else).

i honestly don't see the point in staunchly defending either of the positions regarding the "generation jobless". it's just useless victimizing oneself or giving 'suck it up' responses. it is what it is and the focus should remain on finding viable solutions and not at crying foul.

our generation also seems to have this mentality for entitlement, something BBC articulated quite nicely - Does confidence really breed success?
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Clueless Fox wrote:
Feb 1st, 2013 2:40 pm
C_C, while i understand that it's an employer's market out there and jobs in the entry level positions are fewer and less paid than before, i just hope that you aren't putting yourself among the victims of no/under-employment. you've said so yourself in another thread that you got a ton of interviews...so that at least means that the jobs were out there that you might have qualified for (barring the possible few circumstances where the eliminate the position afterwards altogether or something else).
There are more than a few circumstances. A lot of the entry level jobs are also now part time. If I was a victim I wouldn't be pushing forward, I would throw my hands up in the air and say 'screw it, I'm moving off the grid.' I continue to interview and work. I haven't said a single thing about salary. I don't think its fair to equate discussion of these trends as being a victim, I think thats ridiculous and very short-sighted and simply giving in to ignorance. I'm contributing another viewpoint which doesn't seem to be very welcome here, although the other defense seems to go over well. Just by nature of discussing these issues does not mean that one has given up or given into victimhood, its being aware of whats going on out there and learning from it and building a strategy from it. That to me is being intelligent and informed.

Entitlement and what is being discussed in this thread before the derailment are separate issues. Nobody has come here and said they want a 80k a year job out of school and be the CEO by next week. Basic things are being discussed, the market has changed and is very volatile. Young people are being left behind and they need to learn quickly what the new game is. Watch the documentary.
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I honestly don't see this thread being de-railed.

All that has been posted are sob stories from people who have not been able to find jobs they felt "entitled" to. And attempt to make people feel sorry for them by making terms such as "Generation Jobless, Underclassman, etc..."

Even in the article the people lost out to other candidates. These other candidates who got the jobs, who's to say they weren't also part of this 20-30 year old generation. Like you said, there are two sides to the story.

Yes it sucks having to compete with hundreds if not thousands of candidates thanks to easier communication, but it doesn't mean previous generations are oblivious and have never gone through this kind of situation. It's always been like this and I don't see things changing unless you prefer to go by a utopian system which would work ideally, but never in the real world.
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There is a reason C_C why you have a poor job and can't seem to land a good job even though you go on a lot of interviews as you previously stated. You're doing something wrong. You're not as competitive, intelligent, or your social skills are not substantial enough for either A) the hiring manager or B) you haven't demonstrated why you're any better than any competitor you're up against.
I'd really examine yourself and work on your weaknesses and practice your interview skills. Push yourself to stand out from what you're doing now, which is as you said, working underemployed at a job, complaining about how tough the economy is.
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Sep 16, 2012
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To bring this discussion back into focus, and i myself I am guilty of derailing the thread, however my reason where more to counter act some posts made that i myself thought where to generalized and working of grand assumptions.

The context of this discussion is to speak about board issues that are effecting people on a daily bases, yes in Canada it can be argued that the problem is not as bad as other countries, however to label somebody as entitled and or whining about there current difficulties finding a job is both mean spirited and not helpful to the overall discussion, i for one understand peoples frustrations, i could sit here and give you a play by play of the many frustrations of finding meaningful employment however i rather not hear peoples whining about how they feel Entitled to judge me as person for my life experiences, you want to give reasonable and thought provoking arguments to the discussion, that is fine but try not to be one of those people who sits behinds a computer all day passing judgement on those who you think you know.
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Aug 22, 2011
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I'm glad this is topic being brought up. I can't believe that we don't have a federal education minister and that each province deals with the education system independently, and in disconnect with other provinces.

Kevin O'Leary calls art degrees "hobby degrees", and quite frankly, I have to agree with him. I've met too many students with no clear goals who are just taking a generic or arts degree. I've met art graduates who have acknowledged that their art degrees are as useful as a piano to a guy with amputated hands. However, you can't blame it entirely on the students as we have no accurate labour market information.

Co-op is a great option and can help get your foot in the door, but its highly competitive as their are too many interns and not enough jobs. I think the best way is to market yourself is to find an internship out of side of Canada, find a country where you're degree will be respected, and gain experience.

FUN FACT: Hitler never invaded Switzerland because it would have been too costly since every Swiss citizen have been trained to operate a rifle.
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flight878 wrote:
Feb 1st, 2013 2:17 pm
I don't think C_C is flipping out on people whose opinion differs from hers. I think she's getting irritated from people who are casting judgements based on assumptions they're making, and, with a sanctimonious yet condescending tone, use that as a basis to provide their cookie-cutter "advice", which I'm sure she has seen on endless career, HR-drone prepared job sites. That's a nasty RFD habit around these parts: judging and assuming sh*t about people while feeling morally superior.
That's exactly it.
Clueless Fox wrote:
Feb 1st, 2013 2:40 pm
C_C, while i understand that it's an employer's market out there and jobs in the entry level positions are fewer and less paid than before, i just hope that you aren't putting yourself among the victims of no/under-employment.
Well, I am not unemployed or underemployed, and I still find this discussion worthwhile.
Clueless Fox wrote:
Feb 1st, 2013 2:40 pm
i honestly don't see the point in staunchly defending either of the positions regarding the "generation jobless". it's just useless victimizing oneself or giving 'suck it up' responses. it is what it is and the focus should remain on finding viable solutions and not at crying foul.
Part of finding solutions is identifying the problems as well as the source(s) of the problems. :) So no, it's not useless. And once you have determined that it's not just individual problems of the unemployed/underemployed but a far more widespread issue, then you'd see that it's stupid to give cliche'd advice like that given by tcharged and his gang. Telling 100 applicants for two job openings to "STAND OUT!" does not ameliorate the overall situation.
Clueless Fox wrote:
Feb 1st, 2013 2:40 pm
our generation also seems to have this mentality for entitlement, something BBC articulated quite nicely - Does confidence really breed success?
Yes, I already alluded to that. But it still does not make other issues that we are trying to discuss, non-existent.
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Jun 10, 2010
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I don't get the point of making this a war of generations.

I'm sure other generations had it hard at some point, but I don't see how it makes the current situation less of a problem... And to be honest, I think in the past recessions, we were a more manufacturing oriented country (well at least a lot more than now), so hard job market meant waiting for the demand to come back and the production to follow, now, in a more services oriented market, a recession means asking people to do more for less and even if the economy is getting a bit better, people are asked to keep the same paste so the jobs aren't coming back...

What I'm seeing is a lot of hierarchy levels being cut down and people being kept longer in entry level position, I see a lot of unpaid internship, I see company cutting the salaries of new employees, I see all pension plans being turned into defined contribution for new employees, etc.

I don't have much pity for someone who studied in something where no jobs were waiting for him at the end. I think if you are bright enough to go to university, then you should be bright enough to make sure you are not doing it for nothing.

But denying that there are problems right now for the generation that entered the job market for the past 5 years is putting our heads into the sand... I think it should be seen as the canary in the coal mine. How do we plan to pay for the boomers health care and pension if we are ok with letting the young engineers waiting tables and new accountant stuck in entry level position forever just because "it will show them that they shouldn't have feel entitled to the job they wanted".
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Again, we saw from 2008 forward, a lot of companies going broke and shutting down, i am afraid that what occurred with Nortel retirees and this example is just the beginning of the boarder trend of companies leaving pensions funds under funded and people not having the same benefits as before.
http://www.theglobeandmail.com/report-o ... le8103330/
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Aug 3, 2010
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Most of the successful people I know around my age have arts degree so I'm not sure why they are considered useless.
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PPiL wrote:
Feb 1st, 2013 6:08 pm
But denying that there are problems right now for the generation that entered the job market for the past 5 years is putting our heads into the sand... I think it should be seen as the canary in the coal mine. How do we plan to pay for the boomers health care and pension if we are ok with letting the young engineers waiting tables and new accountant stuck in entry level position forever just because "it will show them that they shouldn't have feel entitled to the job they wanted".
Its not just the past 5 years. Try more like the past 10 years. A big part of the global economic downturn has been related to failing to appropriately integrate the younger crowd into the workforce. The 2003-2007 "recovery" was termed a "jobless recovery". Outside of public servants and construction there was very little hiring activity, especially of the young newer graduates. We now have huge numbers of people who are 5-10 years out of college and still don't have what one could deem to be a reasonable career-entry job.
TodayHello wrote:
Oct 16th, 2012 9:06 pm
...The Banks are smarter than you - they have floors full of people whose job it is to read Mark77 posts...
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JuanExprales wrote:
Feb 1st, 2013 6:46 pm
Most of the successful people I know around my age have arts degree so I'm not sure why they are considered useless.
The past decade has been kind to Arts degree holders, relatively speaking, as much of the employment expansion has been in the public sector. Where an Arts degree is generally more valuable than, say, an engineering, finance, or science degree.
TodayHello wrote:
Oct 16th, 2012 9:06 pm
...The Banks are smarter than you - they have floors full of people whose job it is to read Mark77 posts...
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Anyone notice how the swiss chicks were way hotter than the canadian ones? Every girl working at that bank was a hottie! That guy there must be in heaven.
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