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Getting a job with the Ontario public service?

  • Last Updated:
  • Oct 13th, 2017 12:15 am
[OP]
Jr. Member
User avatar
Aug 29, 2016
124 posts
59 upvotes
Toronto

Getting a job with the Ontario public service?

Hello,

Does anyone here work or has worked for the Ontario public sector? They always have a lot of interesting jobs, and I've applied with a detailed cover letter and resume dozens of times and have yet to even get to the first step of the hiring process.

I currently work for the Federal public service and have had quite a few interviews and tests for a variety positions, which I seem to get quite easily.

What is the trick to getting into the Ontario public sector, or is it generally quite difficult for everyone?
21 replies
Member
Sep 24, 2004
376 posts
35 upvotes
Scarborough
The only trick I'd say is having luck on your side. Smiling Face With Open Mouth Here are a few things:

1. Ensure that the key words from the job description are include in your resume and cover letter
2. A number of open positions already have an incumbent who stands a better chance of being the successful candidate or is the preferred candidate
3. Try and get a temp job. That way you get access to the internal postings.
4. These days it is becoming increasingly difficult for an outsider to get a foot in the door.

Hope that helps....

Good luck with your job hunting
Deal Addict
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Oct 16, 2008
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If you're already in federal, why would you bother? Just curious.
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Sep 22, 2013
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ilove wrote:
May 8th, 2017 11:24 pm
If you're already in federal, why would you bother? Just curious.
Better pay.
Newbie
May 7, 2017
46 posts
18 upvotes
OldMarriedGuy wrote:
May 8th, 2017 11:34 pm
Better pay.
This is probably temporary. Feds have frozen pay for last few years. Next likely PC government in Ontario will freeze teachers and other provincial workers. Doctors will probably keep their sweet deal.
[OP]
Jr. Member
User avatar
Aug 29, 2016
124 posts
59 upvotes
Toronto
ilove wrote:
May 8th, 2017 11:24 pm
If you're already in federal, why would you bother? Just curious.
Pay is better as mentioned by another poster, but also because my field of study is more so provincial than federal.
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Sep 22, 2013
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onthefence wrote:
May 9th, 2017 9:33 am
This is probably temporary. Feds have frozen pay for last few years. Next likely PC government in Ontario will freeze teachers and other provincial workers. Doctors will probably keep their sweet deal.
The increase in pay in comparison from federal or provincial jobs is quite significant. Even with a bump, the Fed pay for a comparable job would be significantly less. The largest group of federal employees is in the process of ratifying their new agreement and the pay increases still put their salary grade at a much lower rate than their provincial comparables.
Sr. Member
Nov 13, 2013
648 posts
219 upvotes
OTTAWA
OldMarriedGuy wrote:
May 9th, 2017 10:07 am
The increase in pay in comparison from federal or provincial jobs is quite significant. Even with a bump, the Fed pay for a comparable job would be significantly less. The largest group of federal employees is in the process of ratifying their new agreement and the pay increases still put their salary grade at a much lower rate than their provincial comparables.
Interesting. How much is the difference for some comparable job categories? Like say Policy Advisor or something like that.
[OP]
Jr. Member
User avatar
Aug 29, 2016
124 posts
59 upvotes
Toronto
fogetmylogin wrote:
May 9th, 2017 10:51 am
Interesting. How much is the difference for some comparable job categories? Like say Policy Advisor or something like that.
Theres a lot of different factors to take into consideration but I would say probaly 20k
Sr. Member
Nov 13, 2013
648 posts
219 upvotes
OTTAWA
dielan wrote:
May 9th, 2017 10:59 am
Theres a lot of different factors to take into consideration but I would say probaly 20k
Feds now top out at 107k for senior policy advisor. (They just concluded an agreement with the union which is why I know the exact salary). Can a provincial policy advisor really make $127k? or is the difference more at the lower levels or something?
Deal Addict
Dec 8, 2008
1555 posts
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fogetmylogin wrote:
May 9th, 2017 11:29 am
Feds now top out at 107k for senior policy advisor. (They just concluded an agreement with the union which is why I know the exact salary). Can a provincial policy advisor really make $127k? or is the difference more at the lower levels or something?
I used to belong to the classification you quoted, have since moved to the OPS and can confirm OPS does *not* better. OPS only pays better for entry level positions but that's about it. An entry level policy analyst could start with >$60k, but an EC-06 equivalent (Sr. policy advisor) currently tops out at $102k. At the end of the day, there's not that much difference.

As for pension, however, I think the fed system is slightly better. I could have retired at age 55 with 30 years of service had I remained with the feds. But in the OPS the earliest date one can retire with unreduced pension depends on "factor 90": age + years of service must reach 90. Consequently, if one had started working at the age of 25 and accrued 30 years of service in the OPS, this person can't retire as the magic number would only amount to 85, not 90. In the federal government this person would be eligible to retire with unreduced pension at age 55.
Newbie
Jul 6, 2011
17 posts
NORTH YORK
leoben wrote:
Jun 18th, 2017 4:22 pm
I used to belong to the classification you quoted, have since moved to the OPS and can confirm OPS does *not* better. OPS only pays better for entry level positions but that's about it. An entry level policy analyst could start with >$60k, but an EC-06 equivalent (Sr. policy advisor) currently tops out at $102k. At the end of the day, there's not that much difference.

As for pension, however, I think the fed system is slightly better. I could have retired at age 55 with 30 years of service had I remained with the feds. But in the OPS the earliest date one can retire with unreduced pension depends on "factor 90": age + years of service must reach 90. Consequently, if one had started working at the age of 25 and accrued 30 years of service in the OPS, this person can't retire as the magic number would only amount to 85, not 90. In the federal government this person would be eligible to retire with unreduced pension at age 55.
dielan wrote:
May 9th, 2017 10:59 am
Theres a lot of different factors to take into consideration but I would say probaly 20k


A EC06 tops out at 107258 currently.

I'd like to see some proof from that poster saying the OPS paying 20K more.

Looks like 100K or 107K in some cases.

https://www.gojobs.gov.on.ca/Preview.aspx?JobID=99192&

https://www.gojobs.gov.on.ca/Preview.aspx?JobID=99602

I've talked to a senior policy analyst in the Federal Public Service who says he considered OPS jobs but it paid way less. Seems like misinformation being spread about 20K more pay.
OldMarriedGuy wrote:
May 8th, 2017 11:34 pm
Better pay.
Proof?
Deal Addict
Jul 12, 2008
1687 posts
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Brampton
Hero88 wrote:
Jun 18th, 2017 5:53 pm
A EC06 tops out at 107258 currently.

I'd like to see some proof from that poster saying the OPS paying 20K more.

Looks like 100K or 107K in some cases.

https://www.gojobs.gov.on.ca/Preview.aspx?JobID=99192&

https://www.gojobs.gov.on.ca/Preview.aspx?JobID=99602

I've talked to a senior policy analyst in the Federal Public Service who says he considered OPS jobs but it paid way less. Seems like misinformation being spread about 20K more pay.



Proof?
Location could also be an issue as to wanting to work for Ontario, I haven't seen that many high level EC06 like roles posted in the GTA area but I regularly see senior policy analyst/senior policy advisor like roles posted by the Ontario Public Service.

Ontario Public Service jobs seem a little harder to get than other govt jobs from a few postings by people here on Rfd (other threads not just this one) and from my experience. Easier ways to land an Ontario role would be through temporary agencies, summer jobs if you qualify or the Ontario Internship Program.
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Dec 8, 2008
1555 posts
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badmus wrote:
Jun 18th, 2017 6:16 pm
Location could also be an issue as to wanting to work for Ontario, I haven't seen that many high level EC06 like roles posted in the GTA area but I regularly see senior policy analyst/senior policy advisor like roles posted by the Ontario Public Service.
Location is the only reason I left my indeterminate fed job for an OPS position. It is extremely rare you would ever find EC-05/06/07 in the GTA. And when you do it usually ends up being just temp work for someone going on mat leave or something.

If one is set on staying in Toronto, OPS > Fed. Career option as a fed employee is so limited in the GTA - even if you are lucky to land a position there is very little upward mobility.
Newbie
Jul 6, 2011
17 posts
NORTH YORK
leoben wrote:
Jun 18th, 2017 6:36 pm
Location is the only reason I left my indeterminate fed job for an OPS position. It is extremely rare you would ever find EC-05/06/07 in the GTA. And when you do it usually ends up being just temp work for someone going on mat leave or something.

If one is set on staying in Toronto, OPS > Fed. Career option as a fed employee is so limited in the GTA - even if you are lucky to land a position there is very little upward mobility.
Yeah fair enough with that logic. I definitely find value in a lower salary but staying where you want to be than a higher one and having to move.
I actually ponder on OPS vs Federal Public Service and salary vs location quite a bit.

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