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Getting a rescue dog

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  • Aug 21st, 2019 9:51 pm
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[OP]
Jr. Member
Sep 20, 2010
133 posts
24 upvotes
Hamilton

Getting a rescue dog

I'm thinking about getting a rescue. We already have one and are at some point going to get another one. For the first dog we went through a breeder.

What are some resources for getting a dog from a shelter? We aren't that picky but low shedding and hypoallergenic would be a plus. I have seen https://homeboundhoundz.com which comes up a lot when I search through some online animal shelters which have Petfinder linked. Not sure if anyone has experience with that or the process.

I keep hearing from everyone there are a ton of dogs in need of a good home and would like our next dog to be one of those.
20 replies
Member
Dec 3, 2009
260 posts
35 upvotes
Rescued our dog from Niagara Dog Rescue and had a really positive experience, but quite a few rescues out there in the GTA.

Go on petfinder and you can have daily emails sent to you based on the type of dogs you're looking at. I would look to connect with those rescues
Member
Mar 5, 2008
360 posts
43 upvotes
u rock dude

check your local shelter
your closest OSPCA location
Petfinder is a good resource
Postings at ur local pet store/groomer/pet daycare etc
Deal Fanatic
May 14, 2009
5579 posts
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Dog Tales
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Deal Addict
Apr 6, 2008
1761 posts
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Petango.com Petfinder.com adoptapet.com and for me, I followed every shelter Facebook within a 2hr driving distance. Lots of dogs out there - good on you for adopting!
[OP]
Jr. Member
Sep 20, 2010
133 posts
24 upvotes
Hamilton
Thanks. Good to know for the future. Will likely look more seriously into it sometime next year.
Deal Addict
Apr 25, 2011
1048 posts
648 upvotes
British Columbia
Good luck in your search. I come with some words of caution...

Around here there are very few rescue dogs available without behavioural or medical conditions. Unless you want a Pit Bull. The rescue organisations can be extremely picky on who they adopt out to as well, requiring home visits and multipule references. Some charge astronomical amounts for their adoption fee simply because they can (see: dog flippers). Even the SPCA charges a lot (644 dollars for a young, small dog around here).

Finding a dog in higher demand (Hypoallergenic I would say falls into this category, but also if you are looking for a smaller breed or a younger dog) can make it next to impossible.

If you are set on a rescue, I would start messaging the rescues now, explain what you're looking for and when roughly you are interested in adopting so if they have some kind of waiting list, you'll be on it.

I looked at rescues for a year, mostly on Petfinder. Messaged shelters and rescues all over North Amercia almost daily... Turned out, none would fly their dogs or even try working with me at all despite me being willing to film my home for their rigorous home checks and that I work in a veterinary hospital and offered multiple veterinary references. I also exercise my dogs off leash an hour daily minimum. I could spend 30 minutes on an application just to most frequently get no response. Long story short, I went through a breeder that did health testing, knew the parents and their personality (which can be hereditary), got exactly what I was looking for, didn't cost much more than from the SPCA, and they actually were accommodating and drove 3 hours in my direction.

Perhaps in your area it won't be so difficult, but I find in general there's such a dog shortage that the majority of recuses out there are now from California, Mexico, and Asia these days.

For example, just now I tried Petfinder -- my criteria was: puppy, good with children, dogs and cats (avoid at all costs a puppy already so damaged that it is not good with these! Behavioural issues are hard to fix.) ... There were about 5 results, mostly Pit Bill looking mixes that are not in the right category, a few Chihuahua, and one adorable dog however it is actually located in Texas. Awesome. Face With Tears Of Joy
Member
User avatar
Dec 3, 2006
357 posts
7 upvotes
Toronto
With some patience the you will find the right dog to adopt. Rescues are the best, They know. Thanks for considering adoption, it saves 2 lives by finding a forever home for one it makes room to rescue another.

GTA / Ontario:
Redemption Paws
Black Dog Rescue
Fetch and Releash
Save Our Scruff
Tiny Paws Dog Rescue
Ugly Mutts Dog Rescue
PB Small Breed Rescue
Lady Bird Animal Sanctuary
Free Korean Dogs
Each municipality will have Animal Services/Shelter
Deal Addict
Jul 7, 2017
1886 posts
666 upvotes
SW corner of the cou…
Karala wrote:
Jul 24th, 2019 12:40 pm
Around here there are very few rescue dogs available without behavioural or medical conditions. Unless you want a Pit Bull. The rescue organisations can be extremely picky on who they adopt out to as well, requiring home visits and multipule references. Some charge astronomical amounts for their adoption fee simply because they can (see: dog flippers). Even the SPCA charges a lot (644 dollars for a young, small dog around here).
That's interesting. In doing dog sits the past few years, my wife and I have heard some stories but dismissed them. We asked someone about his dog and when he said the dog was rescued from Latin America, we asked why not a local dog? He was rather defensive and replied that there were no good dogs in B.C. Your comment makes sense now. Someone else we dogsat for got a rescue puppy from California.

We did another sit where we wondered whether the new owner spirited her latest rescue dog from a travel-to-exotic-locales spay clinic that she worked with.

And high adoption fees aren't limited to dogs. Costs so much for a cat or kitten, even at the SPCA, that our pure-bred Ragdolls from a local breeder.
Almost too cheap to shop through RFD
Deal Addict
Apr 25, 2011
1048 posts
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British Columbia
thriftshopper wrote:
Aug 12th, 2019 12:36 pm
We asked someone about his dog and when he said the dog was rescued from Latin America, we asked why not a local dog? He was rather defensive and replied that there were no good dogs in B.C. Your comment makes sense now. Someone else we dogsat for got a rescue puppy from California.
I think it's because there's a perception that if you don't rescue, you're part of the problem aka a horrible person. There's a need to explain that xyz is the reason you did not opt for a rescue dog when reality is around here it's not all that easy to do so.

I personally would rescue a cat 100% but when it comes to dogs, their different levels of intelligence, trainability, energy, prey drive, health issues, coat types, size range, barking levels etc etc that can all come down to breed genetics/disposition are critical differences that may mean getting a rescue is just not for everyone. If you have specific requirements that you're looking for in a dog such as plans to use it for hunting or agility then a rescue is usually out of the question... or even if you just want a responsive well trained dog you may not find that easily in a rescue due to its age/history/genetic disposition.

When I was looking to a adopt I wanted some specific things which made it impossible... I don't think getting what I want and what fits my lifestyle is unreasonable if I'm to be caring for the dog for the next (hopefully) ~15 years.

A lot of the dogs I've seen coming up from California, Mexico and Asia have health issues too; heartworm, sever dental disease, neurological issues, being excessively timid, missing limbs, heart murmurs, or are very old... I mean, great that they're being rescued, but where are all the lovely, healthy, well adjusted dogs that are being flown in from all over the world (and are not Pit Bulls or Chihuhuas)? I don't see them that often.
Deal Addict
Jul 7, 2017
1886 posts
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SW corner of the cou…
Karala wrote:
Aug 12th, 2019 7:29 pm
I think it's because there's a perception that if you don't rescue, you're part of the problem aka a horrible person
We thought it was the in vogue thing. Then again, we don't have dogs so not in any doggy circle/clique or even in the fringes thereof.
I personally would rescue a cat 100% but when it comes to dogs, their different levels of intelligence, trainability, energy, prey drive, health issues, coat types, size range, barking levels etc etc that can all come down to breed genetics/disposition are critical differences that may mean getting a rescue is just not for everyone. If you have specific requirements that you're looking for in a dog such as plans to use it for hunting or agility then a rescue is usually out of the question... or even if you just want a responsive well trained dog you may not find that easily in a rescue due to its age/history/genetic disposition.
Very true. Too many people want form over function in dogs (and in everything else). Go for the looks and not fully realising the characteristics and whether you can/want to deal with them. I've had labs or lab-like dogs in my youth and in the unlikely event I ever get a dog, it won't be some such because I don't want the doggy smell especially when wet (which it is frequently so where we are).

And, some people get dogs but don't plan for significant life changes (e.g., starting a family). Saw this issue with the last dog sit to the point I was asking people who knew the breed if they wanted the dogs (could have given them away as the dog sitter). And one of the dogs (or both) was a rescue and both had "issues".
A lot of the dogs I've seen coming up from California, Mexico and Asia have health issues too; heartworm, sever dental disease, neurological issues, being excessively timid, missing limbs, heart murmurs, or are very old... I mean, great that they're being rescued, but where are all the lovely, healthy, well adjusted dogs that are being flown in from all over the world? I don't see them that often.
I've heard that (health issues) but don't know of any. The only two rescues we've taken care of that we know come from outside the country (some of the rest were in-country or local rescues) were puppies or young dogs when they came. One had no/little recall (if she got away, just hope she comes back) and the other was aggressive with other dogs, only when he was on leash (park we walked him in was officially leash only - some people who let their dogs off leash would say, "don't worry, my dogs is harmless", where I was tempted to reply, "well, good for you. I have the Great White Dog and he isn't".
Almost too cheap to shop through RFD
Sr. Member
Dec 15, 2015
561 posts
354 upvotes
Toronto
Karala wrote:
Jul 24th, 2019 12:40 pm
Good luck in your search. I come with some words of caution...

Around here there are very few rescue dogs available without behavioural or medical conditions. Unless you want a Pit Bull. The rescue organisations can be extremely picky on who they adopt out to as well, requiring home visits and multipule references. Some charge astronomical amounts for their adoption fee simply because they can (see: dog flippers). Even the SPCA charges a lot (644 dollars for a young, small dog around here).

Finding a dog in higher demand (Hypoallergenic I would say falls into this category, but also if you are looking for a smaller breed or a younger dog) can make it next to impossible.

If you are set on a rescue, I would start messaging the rescues now, explain what you're looking for and when roughly you are interested in adopting so if they have some kind of waiting list, you'll be on it.

I looked at rescues for a year, mostly on Petfinder. Messaged shelters and rescues all over North Amercia almost daily... Turned out, none would fly their dogs or even try working with me at all despite me being willing to film my home for their rigorous home checks and that I work in a veterinary hospital and offered multiple veterinary references. I also exercise my dogs off leash an hour daily minimum. I could spend 30 minutes on an application just to most frequently get no response. Long story short, I went through a breeder that did health testing, knew the parents and their personality (which can be hereditary), got exactly what I was looking for, didn't cost much more than from the SPCA, and they actually were accommodating and drove 3 hours in my direction.

Perhaps in your area it won't be so difficult, but I find in general there's such a dog shortage that the majority of recuses out there are now from California, Mexico, and Asia these days.

For example, just now I tried Petfinder -- my criteria was: puppy, good with children, dogs and cats (avoid at all costs a puppy already so damaged that it is not good with these! Behavioural issues are hard to fix.) ... There were about 5 results, mostly Pit Bill looking mixes that are not in the right category, a few Chihuahua, and one adorable dog however it is actually located in Texas. Awesome. Face With Tears Of Joy
Behavioral issues in dogs are not hard to fix at all...Look at where Michael Vicks dogs are today. Look through the Dodo at all of the stories. Check out guys like Joey Ten, that guy isn't a master trainer. Story after story on NYBC as well.

Also, your criteria landed you the best type of dog for that situation. A pitty/bully is the best family dog and amazing around other animals. How do you work in a Vet office and not know this? I'm not really sure what you were expecting...

Lastly, we've had dogs flown in from all over, I'm going to hazard a guess and say your application was the reason no one wanted to take it further, and from your statements above and below I can hazard a guess to why. Our last girl came from Aruba with a whole slew of issues and cost a ton of money to get healthy. I wouldn't have any other way, and I would NEVER discourage anyone from not adopting because of the potential health risks. It's dumb. Its the reason we rescued, to give the dog a better life. You're really asking where all the healthy nice dogs are at below? Are you that ignorant, really?
Sr. Member
Dec 15, 2015
561 posts
354 upvotes
Toronto
kobe360 wrote:
Jul 19th, 2019 3:34 pm
I'm thinking about getting a rescue. We already have one and are at some point going to get another one. For the first dog we went through a breeder.

What are some resources for getting a dog from a shelter? We aren't that picky but low shedding and hypoallergenic would be a plus. I have seen https://homeboundhoundz.com which comes up a lot when I search through some online animal shelters which have Petfinder linked. Not sure if anyone has experience with that or the process.

I keep hearing from everyone there are a ton of dogs in need of a good home and would like our next dog to be one of those.
Instagram and facebook are good too. Also don't be afraid to foster, it can be rough with a senior that you know may pass with you ( I don't do well with loss) but its also very rewarding and you do have the option of adopting your foster.
Deal Addict
Apr 25, 2011
1048 posts
648 upvotes
British Columbia
TheMaterial wrote:
Aug 20th, 2019 6:47 pm
Behavioral issues in dogs are not hard to fix at all...

A pitty/bully is the best family dog and amazing around other animals. How do you work in a Vet office and not know this? I'm not really sure what you were expecting...

Lastly, we've had dogs flown in from all over, I'm going to hazard a guess and say your application was the reason no one wanted to take it further, and from your statements above and below I can hazard a guess to why.

You're really asking where all the healthy nice dogs are at below? Are you that ignorant, really?
You seem quite confrontational. I can only relay what I have learned in my own life experiences, and I’ve had closer to a decade of work with animals including taming a number of feral cats, most of which became lovely family cats. I am willing to work with animals in difficult situations. Looking for a dog of my own however, I did not want one with pre-existing issues nor did I want an adult dog. As stated, that precluded a lot of dogs. My co-workers and family members have had similar issues in regards to adoption with rescue organizations, as have a number of people I have spoken to, so yeah… not just me and my application, but thanks. /s

In my experience, most people do not have the experience nor are ready to adequately take on any behavioural issue with dogs. Many behavior issues are not an easy fix; even if they do take the steps to get a behaviourist involved and/or medications, they are not issues that resolve easily. They’re lifelong. I 100% would not recommend a dog with behavioral issues to most people. There’s no need to endanger people, other dogs, and the dog itself with someone inexperienced to deal with such issues. For most people, they’re looking for a companion and a dog they can have fun with, not worry about if it’s going to bite a child or maul a dog if off leash, etc.

Regarding Pit Bulls, many I have met are not trustworthy. Some are lovely, sure. Meanwhile some are just nasty, and some are extremely fearful and have aggression issues due to that. When you have a dog that size that won’t allow you to do anything it doesn’t want you to do, handling becomes extremely precarious. A huge number of them are not good with smaller animals or animals in general. I even know of one that was required to be euthanized after mauling a woman, naturally the owner was in the news saying their dog was the nicest dog ever. They’re right up there with the GSD and Chows in regards to out of control dogs I’ve dealt with. This is the similar opinion of most of my co-workers and the veterinarians I work with (many of which have decades of experience, and one vet that even takes a particular interest in behavioral issues and handling practices that minimize aggression/fearfulness).

If you have a different experience, so be it. I absolutely stand by all my statements however.

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