Parenting & Family

Gifted school in York Region

  • Last Updated:
  • Nov 17th, 2017 10:45 pm
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Apr 7, 2012
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manman310 wrote:
Nov 3rd, 2017 1:33 pm
Thank you for response. The school board do the IEP testing at grade 3. My son is only 5 years old now. But he acts out and reject school if he doesn't get challenged ....
So he has undeveloped patience, focus and concentration. That behaviour would be a red flag for me, and any other behaviourist. You should be working on patience and other very basic human developmental skills. He sounds like he's used to being the centre of attention ......

He's 5 years old. What do you think "more scholarly" activities would include?
Serious question.
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Aug 15, 2003
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I've never heard of Prestige School, but I can vouch for PACE. My kid goes there. You need to submit the WPPSI result and visit for one day in order to be admitted. PACE differs from public congregated programs because they are able to accelerate the curriculum ahead by approximately 2 years. Grade ones do grade three (public) level work.
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I think it's great that you're doing your due diligence to ensure your child gets proper education while maximizing his true potential.

I suggest you pay a visit to the elementary school in your district that offers the gifted program and interview the teacher. You'll have a better understanding of the teacher's credentials and teaching style.

In the gifted class, they are surrounded by like-minded peers and they challenge each other's answers and encourage each other to succeed.

I was blown away by the things they teach in the class.

Also, academics is just one piece...it's equally important developing empathy, social skills, sports, etc. (Like many others have mentioned here). These kids love all types of things...keep feeding them information.
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Mar 10, 2010
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Keep in mind that the IQ and other tests are scaled based on age. It is very common (and somewhat ignored) that often students who test gifted at a young age are no longer in the gifted category several years later (same for ASD tests when administered at very young ages). It's a reality that once a student achieves the gifted status they aren't tested again unless specifically requested, so it's not uncommon to find students in the gifted stream who clearly aren't. I'd also tend to shy away from the private schools also due to the reasons posted earlier (teachers are under-paid so there's a lot of turn-over and they're usually the least experienced).
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Oct 17, 2013
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Just because your son is intellectually gifted, doesn't mean that his emotional, social and self-regulatory skills are also gifted. My son went through testing because of his behaviour at the age of 5-6 and it was determined he was gifted. In the process, the pediatrician said that even though his intelligence was at the gifted level, his self-regulation was developing at a regular, if not delayed, level. He was having trouble at school not because he wasn't stimulated enough, but because he didn't know how to deal socially with other kids. Many kids at that age are still developing this very important part of their brain. Only time and learning how to interact in social situations will help. He's now 8, in a regular public system, loving it and doing much better socially, it just took a couple of years.
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Jun 2, 2012
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NORTH YORK
I would keep your kids in a the public school program and get them into the public school gifted stream for now.

One of the only true gifted schools in the GTA is UTS, University of Toronto Schools. It covers grades 7 through 12 only. The application process is very extensive, starts in grade 6 and includes written exams and interviews. The exams test more than just math and science but also look for creativity/imagination and linguistic potential.

The program is exceptionally difficult to get into and only accepts 52 boys and 52 girls for entry into grade 7. Any additional spots in upper years only become available if someone drops out. The application process is extremely competitive, rivaling law school acceptance ratios.

From personal experience, the quality of education, extra-curriculars and student life experience are unmatched. As the school has an extremely generous endowment and offers financial aid to anyone that requires it (assuming the child is successful in the admission process, the student body is extremely varied both financially and culturally. This is a school you can’t buy your way into.

The fact that the school is right downtown, Bloor and Spadina, and that the student body has great influence on various extra curricular programs, including running weekly whole school assemblies, the school teaches independence and leadership, while still fostering social skills and catering to the demonstrably gifted. A note from a psychologist, which I believe can be shopped around for, would not influence an admission decision here.

Graduates regularly get into and attend Ivy Leagues. Not just one a year, but many kids each year.

I am aiming to have my kids attend and will follow the process I outlined above to get there.

ETA: if you are willing to move from San Fran to Markham for school, then might as well consider TO schools too.
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Dec 28, 2015
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freeisnice wrote:
Nov 3rd, 2017 4:44 pm
All that the screening committe does is a psycological testing or a WSIC ( at least that is what they used to do). If your child is already been tested by any psychologist and they find he is gifted, the school board wont dispute it.

Also PACE was set up to help gifted kids ( challenge them), they also need a gifted testing for entrance. So money just doesnt get you into the school.

OP- Talk to to schools , visit them and figure out if you want to send your kid there. The gifted program curriculum in school board doesnt do much, but it does force the kids to mingle with all children and also have kids who might have same interests / capabilities. This is really important, as it helps you cope with peers of all kinds. Dont just think for now ( about his behaviour or his lack of interest), think a few years ahead as to where he will need to be ( his social challenges might need more attention than his giftedness). You will also need to be more hands on parent with his learning, which means finding tihngs that he likes and finding proggrams outside of the school to keep him engaged and mentally stimulated.
I have a gifted kid too, and we have had our challenges keeping him out of trouble and feeding his interest. He is a high schooler now , but we kept him in the public school system in the gifted proggram , but had him in lots of other activities. I have also spent a lot of time with him keeping him engaged. Your childs curiosity and ability to grasp will never go away, but you will need to teach him other skills which may not come that easy.

All the best.
YRDSB no longer accepts testing from 3rd party psychologist for "gifted" due to rampant fraud and questionable results
Jr. Member
Feb 9, 2010
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Aurora
MrWhiteCoffee wrote:
Nov 6th, 2017 11:04 am
YRDSB no longer accepts testing from 3rd party psychologist for "gifted" due to rampant fraud and questionable results
They used to , but I have heard parents talk getting a testing done for real cheap, which must be the reason for the change.
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manman310 wrote:
Nov 3rd, 2017 2:33 pm

Thanks ds2chan! That's such a good idea!! As crazy as it sounds, we really want the best for our son and willing to move back to Markham if that's what best for him. If any case i'll probably make up an excuse and take few months off work and go Canada. My son is 5, he is super attached to me so staying with my parents without me won't work, it'll drive my parents crazy LOL. Thanks again for your suggestion! At the meantime I have to make appointment with those schools and schedule a visit :)
If you think your child will get a better experience (school or other) in Markham vs San Fran, I would question your own cognitive thinking.

Why would you intentionally remove your child from one of the most diverse cities in North America, to put him into one of the most bland, segregated communities in Ontario?
What is the logic behind your thinking?

You still haven't addressed the question of what you think an "advanced" education for a 5 year old would entail vs a public school. I am genuinely curious what the differences would be at such a young age, especially based on the natural developmental stage.

Life experiences are far more beneficial than school, especially at your child's age.

"Many parents of kids under 5 look to IQ tests for a number that will "prove" their child's ability. In truth, IQ testing doesn't tell you much before the school years and even then is generally considered unreliable. Why? Because "giftedness" is typically concentrated in one area and doesn't refer to overall intelligence, the focus of an IQ test. (If you're going to use it for academic placement -- as many schools do, among numerous other factors -- testing between ages 4 and 9 is optimal.)" (source: http://edition.cnn.com/2008/HEALTH/fami ... fted.kids/)

At 5 years old, they spend barely 4 hours a day in "class".
This entire thread boggles my mind.
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Nov 24, 2004
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MrsPotato wrote:
Nov 10th, 2017 12:39 am
Why would you intentionally remove your child from one of the most diverse cities in North America, to put him into one of the most bland, segregated communities in Ontario?
San Fran is diverse "in aggregate" but from my understanding, there is a lot of neighbourhood-based segregation by class, and their schools vary enormously in terms of average family income, ethnic origin, etc.
You still haven't addressed the question of what you think an "advanced" education for a 5 year old would entail vs a public school. I am genuinely curious what the differences would be at such a young age, especially based on the natural developmental stage.
I agree with this completely. I think there are very good evidence-based reasons why the public systems in Ontario start testing and streaming into gifted programs in Grade 3 / 4 (and not in Kindergarten).
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Dec 28, 2015
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MrsPotato wrote:
Nov 10th, 2017 12:39 am
If you think your child will get a better experience (school or other) in Markham vs San Fran, I would question your own cognitive thinking.

Why would you intentionally remove your child from one of the most diverse cities in North America, to put him into one of the most bland, segregated communities in Ontario?
What is the logic behind your thinking?

You still haven't addressed the question of what you think an "advanced" education for a 5 year old would entail vs a public school. I am genuinely curious what the differences would be at such a young age, especially based on the natural developmental stage.

Life experiences are far more beneficial than school, especially at your child's age.

"Many parents of kids under 5 look to IQ tests for a number that will "prove" their child's ability. In truth, IQ testing doesn't tell you much before the school years and even then is generally considered unreliable. Why? Because "giftedness" is typically concentrated in one area and doesn't refer to overall intelligence, the focus of an IQ test. (If you're going to use it for academic placement -- as many schools do, among numerous other factors -- testing between ages 4 and 9 is optimal.)" (source: http://edition.cnn.com/2008/HEALTH/fami ... fted.kids/)

At 5 years old, they spend barely 4 hours a day in "class".
This entire thread boggles my mind.
Much better schools in Markham due to funding and much more diverse and less segregation in Markham

The segregation is very apparent in San Fran and schools are much lower standard especially outside of select areas
[OP]
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Feb 1, 2007
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MrWhiteCoffee wrote:
Nov 10th, 2017 10:29 am
Much better schools in Markham due to funding and much more diverse and less segregation in Markham

The segregation is very apparent in San Fran and schools are much lower standard especially outside of select areas
Thanks for your kind understanding. Honestly, MrsPotato here obviously has no knowledge of how San Francisco school system works. And yes, why would I even think of such idea to cross the nation to move? Guess MrsPotato really think I haven't done my research? I've visited many schools both public and private, and obviously I have my reasons to consider moving back to Markham Canada. I am disappointed how aggressive some Canadian gets so aggressive in all these comments when I was simply asking questions about feedback of two particular school. Honestly, I appreciate all the comment yet I don't appreciate the attack. Guess many Canadian no longer same as before LOL
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Jan 27, 2004
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I'm... kinda reading inbetween the lines here...
I think people in this thread are trying to say gifted children arent really gifted. And that a focus on socialization and sound learning pedagogy is more vital to a child's learning.

I looked through some articles on google... various sources to be sure. There seems to be a consensus that gifted children have high potentiAl, but are lacking in many other very important areas of socialiZation.
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Jun 11, 2006
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I have a son that tested as gifted in Gr 3 through the school system. As a result, he now (in Gr 4) goes to a different school one day a week with other similar kids. They do some more advanced activities. For example, he was working on some Gr 7-8 problems from the UWaterloo computing challenge. He also has an IEP (Individualized Education plan) for his regular class. He really likes it so far, it's his favourite day of the week. So there is something to be said for putting your son with other similar kids (though his class also includes "challenging but gifted" kids).

That said, I am not really sure I consider my son "gifted", nor do I see the need to put him in a gifted program 24/7...he's brighter than average for sure, but I guess I consider "gifted" to be more like 1 in 50,000 kids! ha ha. The only thing that really stuck with me is what his Gr 2 teacher said, which is that I need to ensure he learns to "work" hard, as much of the academic material will be easy for him. If not, he may end up at university without learning to actually work hard at something, which will get him in trouble. So I tend to put a lot on his plate, like music lessons, french immersion, sports etc. He doesn't have any behavioural issues, and while not socially awkward, tends toward the shy side and may miss more social cues than average. So I'm glad we have friends we socialize with on a regular basis, just so he gets more practice at social skills!! (in addition to school). My 2nd son is not at the age to be tested yet, is also bright, though perhaps might be less "gifted" than my first son. I actually predict he will be more successful in life because he easily makes friends and has the ability to get along with many sorts of people.

OP, It sounds like you hope that a gifted school will solve some of your sons behavioural issues. Maybe it will, but maybe he will just be a gifted kid with behavioural issues. I also agree with others that said not to discount the value of socialization in kindergarten. Learning to share, take turns, playing with all different types of kids etc is just as (or more) important for a child.

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