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Glass door for bathroom shower

  • Last Updated:
  • Jan 16th, 2018 2:39 pm
[OP]
Newbie
Aug 14, 2010
41 posts
1 upvote
Toronto

Glass door for bathroom shower

Hi, I am doing bathroom reno, and looking for a glass door for the shower with black metal frame. Appreciate if someone can give some suggestions where I can find this type of door.
I just prefer to have black metal frame rather than silver. Apparently its very hard to find in the GTA area.
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Last edited by riverkid090 on Jan 11th, 2018 9:38 pm, edited 1 time in total.
13 replies
Newbie
Dec 4, 2009
99 posts
40 upvotes
Waterdown
Go to a glass shop and get an 8mm tempered piece that is frameless, it looks much nicer. Hinges, handles and glass spec’d to fit...

Grainger glass in Waterdown was helpful for us a few years ago.
[OP]
Newbie
Aug 14, 2010
41 posts
1 upvote
Toronto
Thanks @Todd96srv I am in GTA area, Waterdown is a bit far for me. I am not sure where I can find a good glass shop in my area with better quality
Newbie
Dec 4, 2009
99 posts
40 upvotes
Waterdown
Google a local glass shop, there’s likely someone nearby. “Specialty Glass”
Sr. Member
Jul 3, 2017
787 posts
516 upvotes
Be careful with tempered glass shower doors - there have been cases of them "exploding" when an impact cracked them and suddenly released the 10,000 psi+ surface tension of the glass. Make sure you get safety glass with a plastic laminate layer.
https://www.thespruce.com/glass-shower- ... lf-3972517
Deal Addict
Jan 19, 2011
2383 posts
555 upvotes
Exp315 wrote:
Jan 12th, 2018 12:04 am
Be careful with tempered glass shower doors - there have been cases of them "exploding" when an impact cracked them and suddenly released the 10,000 psi+ surface tension of the glass. Make sure you get safety glass with a plastic laminate layer.
https://www.thespruce.com/glass-shower- ... lf-3972517
I am not certain you understand what tempered glass is and how it works.

I have a tempered glass frameless shower door in my bathroom, and they are ALWAYS manufactured with tempered glass, and they are virtually NEVER installed with laminate plastic layers. The tempered glass is roughly five times stronger than regular or annealed glass, and the safety feature is that in the extremely unlikely event that they shatter, the glass explodes into virtually harmless little cubes, rather than razor sharp triangular shards.

http://www.deltashowerdoors.com/safety- ... ower-doors

OP, find any specialty glass shop or glass installer and look for a tempered glass frameless shower door, they are now becoming extremely common, and you should be able to find dozens of companies across the GTA able to manufacture and install one for you.

https://www.google.ca/search?q=glass+sh ... e&ie=UTF-8

there is your search, at least a dozen places
"The truth is incontrovertible, malice may attack it, ignorance may deride it, but in the end; there it is."
Just a guy who dabbles in lots of stuff learning along the way. I do have opinions, and readily share them!
Sr. Member
Jul 3, 2017
787 posts
516 upvotes
fieldhousehandyman wrote:
Jan 12th, 2018 5:06 am
I am not certain you understand what tempered glass is and how it works.
Do you? Tempered glass is cooled in such a way that the surface layer solidifies first, and is then pulled into very high compression as the inner core solidifies and shrinks. To be tempered glass, it must be under 10,000 psi+ compression. That makes it stronger than regular glass in the same way that prestressed concrete is stronger. Any force trying to pull the glass apart (like a crack or bending force) must first overcome the surface tension. But once it does, the tempered glass shatters with much more force than regular glass as the tension lets go. It does shatter into smaller rounded pieces, but those pieces can fly everywhere.

Your car uses tempered glass in the windows. If you have sliding glass doors, they use tempered glass. But in both of those cases, they are required use a laminate plastic layer to make sure that the glass stays in place when it shatters. Shower doors often don't. That's a safety flaw.
Newbie
Dec 22, 2017
59 posts
24 upvotes
Don't do frame..do frameless, looks much much nicer
Deal Addict
Jan 25, 2007
3212 posts
943 upvotes
Paris
Exp315 wrote:
Jan 12th, 2018 9:16 am
Do you? Tempered glass is cooled in such a way that the surface layer solidifies first, and is then pulled into very high compression as the inner core solidifies and shrinks. To be tempered glass, it must be under 10,000 psi+ compression. That makes it stronger than regular glass in the same way that prestressed concrete is stronger. Any force trying to pull the glass apart (like a crack or bending force) must first overcome the surface tension. But once it does, the tempered glass shatters with much more force than regular glass as the tension lets go. It does shatter into smaller rounded pieces, but those pieces can fly everywhere.

Your car uses tempered glass in the windows. If you have sliding glass doors, they use tempered glass. But in both of those cases, they are required use a laminate plastic layer to make sure that the glass stays in place when it shatters. Shower doors often don't. That's a safety flaw.
As window door guy can confirm. My cousin was showering at their cottage and shower door exploded damaging drywall and broke the mirror over the sink there was such force. It shattered OUTWARDS from the shower, so the outer layer was the compromised layer, lucky for him.

Laminated glass is also sometimes called hurricane glass at the extreme end and you need a concrete saw to break into it. The lamination layer is why you see broken windshields in movies that can be kicked out in one piece versus them exploding into a puddle.
Gbill2004: Thanks but I'll just smell the couch before/if I buy it.

jonnyb: I go in there like PICASSO and toss the glue everywhere, I don't care what house I'm on.
Deal Addict
Jan 19, 2011
2383 posts
555 upvotes
Exp315 wrote:
Jan 12th, 2018 9:16 am
Do you? Tempered glass is cooled in such a way that the surface layer solidifies first, and is then pulled into very high compression as the inner core solidifies and shrinks. To be tempered glass, it must be under 10,000 psi+ compression. That makes it stronger than regular glass in the same way that prestressed concrete is stronger. Any force trying to pull the glass apart (like a crack or bending force) must first overcome the surface tension. But once it does, the tempered glass shatters with much more force than regular glass as the tension lets go. It does shatter into smaller rounded pieces, but those pieces can fly everywhere.

Your car uses tempered glass in the windows. If you have sliding glass doors, they use tempered glass. But in both of those cases, they are required use a laminate plastic layer to make sure that the glass stays in place when it shatters. Shower doors often don't. That's a safety flaw.
I know exactly what tempered glass is.

It is interesting you would make a specific claim about the types of windows on my car, but perhaps you should do a little more research, as you are incorrect.

Although windshields on all automobiles have been laminated glass for decades, the majority of side and rear windows (regardless of if they are hinged door, sliding door, fixed in place, or liftgate) are actually non laminated glass, but toughened or tempered, and shatter into a million fragments. I had a grounds person shoot a rock from a lawn mower into the side rear window of my Ford Freestar minivan, and the bulk of it ended up on the lawn he was cutting, I have also broken into at least a half dozen vehicles to rescue the occupants inside, all side windows, all fragmented, and NONE had a safety film or laminate layer. That said, laminate glass is being used now on more automobile windows than in the past.

If you can provide any data whatsoever of any injuries from exploding shower doors, I would love to know, but even though they do explode in rare occasions (I am not disputing that fact), they are unlikely to cause more injury than being pelted with a handful of ice melting salt.

The lack of laminate coatings in shower doors is not a safety flaw whatsoever.

You may with to read this article with respect to the 'non-use' of laminated or safety glass in automobiles.

https://www.hg.org/article.asp?id=19112

Back to the OP, naturally, if you do not want chrome, and cannot find black, go frameless
"The truth is incontrovertible, malice may attack it, ignorance may deride it, but in the end; there it is."
Just a guy who dabbles in lots of stuff learning along the way. I do have opinions, and readily share them!
[OP]
Newbie
Aug 14, 2010
41 posts
1 upvote
Toronto
Thanks for all the valuable comments and suggestion
My contractor is able to find a shop who can do the black frame glass door
I am going for the pivot door, only have the frame on the outside to avoid water leaking between the glasses.
Apparently there is a chance water will leak through the metal frame between the metal gap (its a 2 pieces door). I am better to go with outter frame, and leaving the inside edges frame less.
Member
Mar 14, 2006
410 posts
181 upvotes
Toronto
Have you considered a frameless shower door? It looks way cleaner and nicer.

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