Careers

Going into Healthcare - Two Year Options

[OP]
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May 11, 2017
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Going into Healthcare - Two Year Options

Hello there,

I graduated with a Bachelor of Commerce, and now work for one of the big five banks. I'm looking to get out of the banking/financial services industry and want to go into healthcare, which means going back to school. I'm thinking about applying to the Occupational Health and Safety program at Ryerson University. I can complete the program in two years since I already have a degree, and it's relatively close to my workplace; ideally, I want to work full time or part time at the bank while completing the degree at Ryerson so I still have some sort of income.

On the other hand, I'm not entirely sure Occupational Health is the right path for me, and I'm not particularly fond of Ryerson...
Are there any other undergrad options anyone knows of that take two or three years? I was also thinking about going to Michener for Respiratory Therapy, but don't know if I'm cut out for shift work at a hospital. Honestly, I need to shadow someone, or go to something like a "Take Your Kids To Workday" event to make the right decision but don't have the connections. Any education/career advice would be much appreciated.
26 replies
Sr. Member
Sep 4, 2007
996 posts
388 upvotes
Edmonton
Volunteer at the hospital and find out? You want to change jobs why? Money?
Member
Aug 17, 2008
482 posts
8 upvotes
Just a heads up, the OH&S 2 year option at Ryerson would not be an ideal choice. The regular 4 year undergraduate program is better because it gives you a co-op option (the 2 year option you're thinking about does not). A lot of students that finish the two year option do not end up getting jobs because:

a) They have no experience
b) They are competing with graduates from Master's degrees in Occupational Health at UofT, McGill, and UBC. I'm in the field (and it is a small field; so you tend to bump into the same people over and over) and I know a lot of the jobs are secured by students from these programs (at least in Ontario).


However, if you don't plan on staying in Ontario and want to go out West to the oil fields, then the 2 year option would be viable. Just my 2 cents.
Deal Guru
Dec 31, 2005
13196 posts
672 upvotes
First, you need to know what you mean by healthcare.

There are countless people that have commerce or similar degrees in healthcare companies. This past month I interviewed someone for a Manager of a Proposal Centre who had a commerce degree. Once in to a company then you show your worth and you are looked at for any number of paths. Don't be close minded.
[OP]
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May 11, 2017
32 posts
34 upvotes
nalababe wrote:
May 13th, 2017 2:26 pm
First, you need to know what you mean by healthcare.

There are countless people that have commerce or similar degrees in healthcare companies. This past month I interviewed someone for a Manager of a Proposal Centre who had a commerce degree. Once in to a company then you show your worth and you are looked at for any number of paths. Don't be close minded.
Thanks for replying. What would some entry levels roles be in healthcare companies for someone with a B.Comm? I'm a recent graduate and don't have a lot of work experience but I imagine if I work in a healthcare company, I would only be qualified for a customer service role, clerical/admin work, or a finance related position. I mean, I've seen a job posting for a hand sanitization device company where every employee has a science background; even the customer service representatives have a Bachelor or Masters in Science.

This is why I'm looking at the fastest route to become a professional in healthcare, whether it be going into Occupational Health and Safety, or Respiratory Therapy. If I can do that with a B.Comm, please tell me how.
[OP]
Newbie
User avatar
May 11, 2017
32 posts
34 upvotes
hunt3rshadow wrote:
May 13th, 2017 12:34 pm
Just a heads up, the OH&S 2 year option at Ryerson would not be an ideal choice. The regular 4 year undergraduate program is better because it gives you a co-op option (the 2 year option you're thinking about does not). A lot of students that finish the two year option do not end up getting jobs because:

a) They have no experience
b) They are competing with graduates from Master's degrees in Occupational Health at UofT, McGill, and UBC. I'm in the field (and it is a small field; so you tend to bump into the same people over and over) and I know a lot of the jobs are secured by students from these programs (at least in Ontario).


However, if you don't plan on staying in Ontario and want to go out West to the oil fields, then the 2 year option would be viable. Just my 2 cents.
Thank you for replying! I know the 4 year option is better but don't want to spend that long in getting another undergraduate degree. To be honest, I don't know for sure if I'm cut out for the OH&S field; what appeals to me is that I can get a Bachelor of Applied Science degree in two years. If I like it and I can get a job in the field, good; if not, I was considering going to Michener after getting a degree from Ryerson.

I'm not sure what the etiquette is since I'm a newbie, but would you mind if I ask you further questions about the OH&S field by sending you a message?
[OP]
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May 11, 2017
32 posts
34 upvotes
frozenmelon wrote:
May 13th, 2017 11:45 am
Volunteer at the hospital and find out? You want to change jobs why? Money?
I'll try but competition to volunteer at hospitals is tough. Back in high school, I attended an information session to volunteer at Sunnybrook Hospital; volunteer positions included working at the gift shop, etc. and of course everyone wants to volunteer inside the actual hospital.

I'm a contractor working in back office and want to change fields because I can't see myself working for the bank for 5,10 or 20 years. I previously had a stint in retail banking; sales wasn't for me, so I left and decided to try working in back office. Now that I'm in back office, I'm a mere cog in the machine, easily replaceable once my contract ends, and there's a psychopathic team leader who thinks its okay to harass me with obnoxious questions when no one's around.
Member
Sep 14, 2012
264 posts
66 upvotes
Greater Toronto Area
spiritedaway wrote:
May 13th, 2017 3:35 pm
I'll try but competition to volunteer at hospitals is tough. Back in high school, I attended an information session to volunteer at Sunnybrook Hospital; volunteer positions included working at the gift shop, etc. and of course everyone wants to volunteer inside the actual hospital.

I'm a contractor working in back office and want to change fields because I can't see myself working for the bank for 5,10 or 20 years. I previously had a stint in retail banking; sales wasn't for me, so I left and decided to try working in back office. Now that I'm in back office, I'm a mere cog in the machine, easily replaceable once my contract ends, and there's a psychopathic team leader who thinks its okay to harass me with obnoxious questions when no one's around.
Have you thought after switching jobs? Obviously getting a permanent role is harder, but it sounds like (from your post) the issues stem from 1. being on contract and 2. dealing with a bad boss.
A job switch would help with this, instead of going straight into a different industry.
Member
Aug 17, 2008
482 posts
8 upvotes
spiritedaway wrote:
May 13th, 2017 3:35 pm
Thank you for replying! I know the 4 year option is better but don't want to spend that long in getting another undergraduate degree. To be honest, I don't know for sure if I'm cut out for the OH&S field; what appeals to me is that I can get a Bachelor of Applied Science degree in two years. If I like it and I can get a job in the field, good; if not, I was considering going to Michener after getting a degree from Ryerson.

I'm not sure what the etiquette is since I'm a newbie, but would you mind if I ask you further questions about the OH&S field by sending you a message?
Sure, ask away. Just be warned that I'm relatively new in the field as well, but this is what I've observed up to this point.
[OP]
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May 11, 2017
32 posts
34 upvotes
Sneakymist wrote:
May 13th, 2017 6:39 pm
Have you thought after switching jobs? Obviously getting a permanent role is harder, but it sounds like (from your post) the issues stem from 1. being on contract and 2. dealing with a bad boss.
A job switch would help with this, instead of going straight into a different industry.
I know its pretty shitty of me, but I honestly want to break my current contract and give the standard two week notice. But then what would be my next step? I'm scarred from working at the banks, and with my current degree, I don't know if I can get a good job.

My initial plan was to suck it up, and get at least a good reference from my boss so I can still work downtown in a bank while completing my degree at Ryerson. If I switch to OH&S, I should start gaining experience in the field but it's a clutch 22 since I don't have the education or experience. That's why even though it's not where I want to be, I'll still be gaining work experience at the bank during my time at Ryerson. On the other hand, I have around four months left to my contract.....to me, it's a long period of time.
[OP]
Newbie
User avatar
May 11, 2017
32 posts
34 upvotes
divx wrote:
May 13th, 2017 7:35 pm
is accounting hurting that bad now?
Accounting scarred me ever since I dropped it in high school, and again when I took managerial accounting in post secondary and didn't do so well in it. Not to mention, I'd have to eventually obtain a CPA which takes 2 years? I thought about this route just because I know a way to get a Sage 50 certificate but man, accounting seems to be an over saturated field.
Deal Guru
Dec 31, 2005
13196 posts
672 upvotes
spiritedaway wrote:
May 13th, 2017 3:34 pm
Thanks for replying. What would some entry levels roles be in healthcare companies for someone with a B.Comm? I'm a recent graduate and don't have a lot of work experience but I imagine if I work in a healthcare company, I would only be qualified for a customer service role, clerical/admin work, or a finance related position. I mean, I've seen a job posting for a hand sanitization device company where every employee has a science background; even the customer service representatives have a Bachelor or Masters in Science.

This is why I'm looking at the fastest route to become a professional in healthcare, whether it be going into Occupational Health and Safety, or Respiratory Therapy. If I can do that with a B.Comm, please tell me how.
You have to start somewhere. Perform and the possibility is that you can move anywhere in operations, anywhere in Sales and Marketing etc...With the exception of a small number of positions (i.e., legal) you actually don't require any specific training.
Sr. Member
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Aug 8, 2015
753 posts
792 upvotes
Toronto
With your degree, I think you have a few options related to the field of healthcare : pharmaceutical or medical devices sales rep, project manager for a pharmaceutical company, insurance company jobs (e.g. disability case manager)

Those jobs usually do not require any background in sciences

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