• Last Updated:
  • Feb 10th, 2018 12:03 pm
Tags:
[OP]
Penalty Box
Apr 15, 2011
3222 posts
361 upvotes
Scarborough

Going vegan

I watched a documentary on Netflix called "what the health" and it opened my eyes to alot of things. Anyone who knows me would tell you that me going vegan is a big joke. But I think I'm at a phase now where health issues have become more of a priority. Also social causes like animal cruelty, and climate change have also affected my thinking on this subject somewhat. My plan is to cut out as much dairy from my diet as possible and all meats. The problem is, I have no clue where to start. I don't think I'll be able to be 100% faithful to my goal in the beginning but I think I can make progress and at one point get cold turkey off meat. Any tips would be appreciated.
165 replies
Member
Apr 28, 2014
207 posts
82 upvotes
Waterloo, ON
What's your diet like now? It's hard to tell you what substitutions to use, for example, without knowing what you are eating at the moment.
[OP]
Penalty Box
Apr 15, 2011
3222 posts
361 upvotes
Scarborough
SouthOnt wrote:
Dec 27th, 2017 2:26 pm
What's your diet like now? It's hard to tell you what substitutions to use, for example, without knowing what you are eating at the moment.
im eating tons of junk food, ie mcdonalds, kfc, tacobell, the chinese foods (chilli chicken, sweet and sour, beef). At home I eat rice, chicken curry, some brocolli, carrots, potatoes, eggs. I also love snacking on chips, soda, chocolates, donuts, ice cream etc etc. This is my general pattern for my diet. I'm trying to go vegan, so i don't plan on giving up my soda and chips. Everything else including meats and all dairy products is on the chopping block. Again, im just planning on trying this vegan diet, to see if I can survive on this kind of meal. Im going to gradually shift away from meats and dairy during this week and hopefully be able to have a plan that I can then continue on with later.
Newbie
May 22, 2009
78 posts
9 upvotes
Nice! Yo I'm a junk food vegan lol, it's totally possible. Honestly I find it easier.

http://reddit.com/r/vegan is great for beginner tips.
https://www.peta.org/living/food/accidentally-vegan/ has some accidentally vegan snacks and food.
Youtube is your friend. Search up whatever your favourite food was and then add vegan to the end to find a substitute recipe, it's really very easy. Google works the same way, for recipes that don't have videos.


Some meat substitutes are TVP (texturized vegetable protein), soya chunks, seitan (made from vital wheat gluten) and tofu (learn to cook it well and you'll always love it -- it takes the flavour of whatever you marinade it in after pressing its packaged protein water out).
That's not all, but it's the basic ones I make whenever I'm hungry.

Mr. Noodles are vegan, same with the Walmart off brand ones. Regular Ritz crackers, Oreos, most offbrand sandwich cookies, most Dollar Tree cookies, lots of stuff at Dollarama. Most dark chocolate, a favourite of mine is noname's dark chocolate 100g bar for $1.

Chickpeas, hummus, kidney beans, chili, tacos, pizza -- you can make it all.

Pizza Pizza has violife cheese -- the cheese is not available in stores yet but they're working on it. But Pizza Pizza can be made vegan without extra charge. $9.99 XL 1-toppings are my favourite. Load up on thick crust and lots of free toppings as well. It's great for an entire day's food and then some.

You'll feel a lot better, good on you for making this decision -- you can do it. For sure. Good luck!
Deal Guru
Feb 9, 2012
13257 posts
2152 upvotes
Toronto
Go to a Hot pot restaurant and order the veggie/tofu soup base.
Select only vegan/vegetarian options on the card sheet they provide to fill out.
You will have a very good meal (prices vary from restaurant to restaurant)

You can also do hot pot from home, if desired. Before doing so, visit a hot pot restaurant and snatch up one of their cards so you can get an idea of what to look for in the grocery store.
Cross off all the non vegan things on the card and work on it from there.

The good news is, if you feel you MUST eat meat, hot pot meat (pork, beef, lamb) is thin, so you're effectively cutting back the intake of meat already. (vs eating a pork chop or steak)
The average restaurant tray of meat is 4-5 thin slices.
The Hot pot restaurants will also love you because meat is one of their more expensive items anyway. Chances are great they just might gladly help you avoid meat, steering you to cheaper HP ingredients. (especially noodles, lol)
[OP]
Penalty Box
Apr 15, 2011
3222 posts
361 upvotes
Scarborough
LucarioPK wrote:
Dec 27th, 2017 3:16 pm
Nice! Yo I'm a junk food vegan lol, it's totally possible. Honestly I find it easier.

http://reddit.com/r/vegan is great for beginner tips.
https://www.peta.org/living/food/accidentally-vegan/ has some accidentally vegan snacks and food.
Youtube is your friend. Search up whatever your favourite food was and then add vegan to the end to find a substitute recipe, it's really very easy. Google works the same way, for recipes that don't have videos.


Some meat substitutes are TVP (texturized vegetable protein), soya chunks, seitan (made from vital wheat gluten) and tofu (learn to cook it well and you'll always love it -- it takes the flavour of whatever you marinade it in after pressing its packaged protein water out).
That's not all, but it's the basic ones I make whenever I'm hungry.

Mr. Noodles are vegan, same with the Walmart off brand ones. Regular Ritz crackers, Oreos, most offbrand sandwich cookies, most Dollar Tree cookies, lots of stuff at Dollarama. Most dark chocolate, a favourite of mine is noname's dark chocolate 100g bar for $1.

Chickpeas, hummus, kidney beans, chili, tacos, pizza -- you can make it all.

Pizza Pizza has violife cheese -- the cheese is not available in stores yet but they're working on it. But Pizza Pizza can be made vegan without extra charge. $9.99 XL 1-toppings are my favourite. Load up on thick crust and lots of free toppings as well. It's great for an entire day's food and then some.

You'll feel a lot better, good on you for making this decision -- you can do it. For sure. Good luck!
Thanks for the tip, especially on the snacks haha. I know everyone has their reasons, but I'm not going veggie for moral reasons. I've known about the conditions of animals in these slaughter houses for long while and I've been able still enjoy my meals. It bothered me off course, but not enough to turn me off of meat. The most pressing concerns for me are 1)my health which I think is starting to decline to shet, 2)affect of meat consumption on the environment and 3)animal cruelty, in that order.

I've heard a lot of people mention supplements that should be taken. How true is this exactly? Iron might be hard to obtain and b12, but I was looking at soy milk and found that it was supemented with b12. As for iron, I'm not sure which vegan foods I can obtain that from.
Deal Fanatic
May 14, 2009
5131 posts
483 upvotes
Just wanted to add that I wouldn't base your decision on that propaganda, er, movie.

As an ex vegan (12 years) and numerous more years as a vegetarian (I'm now an omnivore again), I'd suggest going slow. Remove things slowly instead of going all in. Also, very important to not just take your current diet and remove all the animal products and just stick to what's left. You may need to introduce things that you don't like, depending on what your starting point is.

Also, some people will tell you that you don't need to supplement. Personally, in my experience (not just a hunch, regular blood tests), you will likely have to supplement with calcium, vitamin D, B12, zinc, and iron to name a few. Heck, I eat a whole foods based, omnivorous diet now and I still supplemen.
[OP]
Penalty Box
Apr 15, 2011
3222 posts
361 upvotes
Scarborough
amz155 wrote:
Dec 27th, 2017 5:12 pm
Just wanted to add that I wouldn't base your decision on that propaganda, er, movie.

As an ex vegan (12 years) and numerous more years as a vegetarian (I'm now an omnivore again), I'd suggest going slow. Remove things slowly instead of going all in. Also, very important to not just take your current diet and remove all the animal products and just stick to what's left. You may need to introduce things that you don't like, depending on what your starting point is.

Also, some people will tell you that you don't need to supplement. Personally, in my experience (not just a hunch, regular blood tests), you will likely have to supplement with calcium, vitamin D, B12, zinc, and iron to name a few. Heck, I eat a whole foods based, omnivorous diet now and I still supplemen.
12 years a vegetarian?? wow thats amazing. I didn't even last one meal after my vegetarian declaration, though I still haven't given up on the quest yet. Instead of going full out vegetarian at the beginning, i'm going decrease my consumption of meat significantly instead. For example, if I can go 2 or 3 days a week without meat, thats already a huge improvement. Then maybe increase that to 4 or 5 days a week and eventually full time. The advantage of this initially is that I won't be needing to supplement as much in the beginning when i'm getting started.

Besides that I was researching some foods and soymilk comes fortified with most of the things you mentioned, same with whole wheat breads and other common staples. I think its just a little more difficult and maybe inconvenient to get your nutrients compared to people that eat meat. Getting regular blood tests isn't a problem, i've been doing it anyway.
Sr. Member
User avatar
Jun 5, 2017
558 posts
53 upvotes
Guelph, Ont
i felt the same was as OP but now im like 95% vegetarian. the only meat i eat is organic chicken from a farm that promotes a cruelty free, good life for the chickens and even that im phasing out slowly with the goal to be meat free soon. going vegan seems more difficult but im open to it.

check out this site for meal ideas.
http://thegreenplate.com/
Deal Addict
User avatar
Aug 12, 2007
3604 posts
135 upvotes
Toronto
blaznazn22 wrote:
Dec 27th, 2017 2:55 pm
im eating tons of junk food, ie mcdonalds, kfc, tacobell, the chinese foods (chilli chicken, sweet and sour, beef).
blaznazn22 wrote:
Dec 27th, 2017 2:55 pm
The most pressing concerns for me are 1)my health which I think is starting to decline to shet,
You don't need to go vegan. You need to stop eating junk.
Deal Guru
User avatar
Mar 14, 2005
11877 posts
1712 upvotes
City of Vancouver
OP is on a trajectory towards type II diabetes and man boobs. Seriously, cut out the soda and this addiction to junk food that u have.
Newbie
Sep 16, 2017
8 posts
blaznazn22 wrote:
Dec 27th, 2017 2:55 pm
the chinese foods (chilli chicken, sweet and sour, beef).
LOL. I guess it depends on where you get them?
Newbie
Sep 16, 2017
8 posts
blaznazn22 wrote:
Dec 27th, 2017 6:17 pm
12 years a vegetarian?? wow thats amazing. I didn't even last one meal after my vegetarian declaration, though I still haven't given up on the quest yet. Instead of going full out vegetarian at the beginning, i'm going decrease my consumption of meat significantly instead. For example, if I can go 2 or 3 days a week without meat, thats already a huge improvement. Then maybe increase that to 4 or 5 days a week and eventually full time. The advantage of this initially is that I won't be needing to supplement as much in the beginning when i'm getting started.

Besides that I was researching some foods and soymilk comes fortified with most of the things you mentioned, same with whole wheat breads and other common staples. I think its just a little more difficult and maybe inconvenient to get your nutrients compared to people that eat meat. Getting regular blood tests isn't a problem, i've been doing it anyway.
Do you want to be a Vegan? or Vegetarian? They are two different things. Even for Vegetarian, there are two concepts too.

Vegan = Pure plant-base ingredient
Asian Vegetarian = Drink milk, eat eggs, and consume butter.
North American Vegetarian = Eat fish.
Deal Fanatic
May 14, 2009
5131 posts
483 upvotes
blaznazn22 wrote:
Dec 27th, 2017 6:17 pm
12 years a vegetarian?? wow thats amazing. I didn't even last one meal after my vegetarian declaration, though I still haven't given up on the quest yet. Instead of going full out vegetarian at the beginning, i'm going decrease my consumption of meat significantly instead. For example, if I can go 2 or 3 days a week without meat, thats already a huge improvement. Then maybe increase that to 4 or 5 days a week and eventually full time. The advantage of this initially is that I won't be needing to supplement as much in the beginning when i'm getting started.

Besides that I was researching some foods and soymilk comes fortified with most of the things you mentioned, same with whole wheat breads and other common staples. I think its just a little more difficult and maybe inconvenient to get your nutrients compared to people that eat meat. Getting regular blood tests isn't a problem, i've been doing it anyway.
12 years vegan, and then intransitioned to lacto-vegetarian, then lacto ovo vegetarian and then omnivore. So from age 14-36 without eating meat.

You might get regular blood tests for some things, but afaik doctors don't regularly test for zinc, and depending on which province you're in, healthcare doesn't cover Vitamin D testing (it did for me bc I met the eligibility criteria).

You don't need to omit animal products to improve your diet. Sounds like your diet is based on processed foods. Try switching to a whole foods based diet, say 80/20 split of whole foods to 'junk'.

Top