Expired Hot Deals

Good Digital Multimeter with frequency and capacitance measurements for $15

  • Last Updated:
  • May 31st, 2005 10:41 pm
Tags:
None
[OP]
Deal Addict
User avatar
Oct 13, 2002
2953 posts
10 upvotes

Good Digital Multimeter with frequency and capacitance measurements for $15

Several members PMed me about the deal in the CT thread, so I decided to make a plug for a small company. :D
This is for Vancouverites only, so too bad for everybody else. :razz:

Lee's is a local electronics store in Vancouver and they probably do not ship. As the name suggests, the store is owned and operated by Mr. and Mrs. Lee. ;)

Here is the link to their horrible website with more spelling mistakes than I can think of: :D
http://www.leeselectronic.com/Multimeter.htm
(The specifications are a direct copy of http://www.altadox.com/specifications/vc202_specs.htm with some added spelling errors :lol: )

And for the picture posters:
[IMG]http://www.altadox.com/gallery/midium/DMM_VC202_M.JPG[/IMG]

I am assuming that it uses the 7106 IC since it is silkscreened onto the PCB, but maybe that is a lie? The actual IC has a black blob covering it... Has two or three ICs for the capacitance and frequency measurements probably.

(And CanadaBoy :razz: )
Specifications: (More expensive features in bold)

23 ranges
1999 Counts max.
12mm high digit LCD
Data hold
Low battery indication
Full overload protection
Fuse protection at 10A current range
Frequency response: 40Hz ~ 400Hz
DC voltage: 200mV/2V/20V/200V/1000V (± 0.5%)
AC voltage: 20V/200V/700V (± 0.8%)
DC current: 20mA/200mA/10A (± 1.2%)
AC current: 20mA/200mA/10A (± 1.2%)
Resistance: 200©/2k©/20k©/200k©/2M© (± 0.8%)
Capacitance: 20nF/200nF/20µF (± 4.0%)
Frequency: 200kHz (± 2.5%)

Diode check
Triode check
Continuity test (audible)
Power source: 6F22 (9V) x 1
Dimension: 140 x 65 x 40mm
Weight: approx. 170g (including battery)


Manual here:

The only bad things I can find about it is:
  • thickness due to the battery
  • no shielding
  • weird sound for continuity test
  • poor-quality test leads
  • frequency and capacitance measurements of limited range
    (when plugged into the mains, the frequency just alternates between 0.00 and 0.01 kHz. Only one range.)
25 replies
Deal Expert
User avatar
Oct 15, 2002
18196 posts
137 upvotes
GTA
What is the difference between this and the CT one for $10 on sale?
Sr. Member
User avatar
Nov 30, 2002
525 posts
42 upvotes
Downtown Toronto
I haven't used it, but...

It has frequency and capacitance measurement and data hold, I don't think any CT multimeter can match those features.

(Sorry for the noise if I am mistaken)
[OP]
Deal Addict
User avatar
Oct 13, 2002
2953 posts
10 upvotes
teddy boom wrote:This needs a bump!
Thanks. I almost forgot about it. :D
teddy boom wrote:I haven't used it, but...

It has frequency and capacitance measurement and data hold, I don't think any CT multimeter can match those features.
That is about all. The main advantages I have highlighted in bold. Just remember the audible continuity sound sounds worse than scratching on a chalkboard.
teddy boom wrote:(Sorry for the noise if I am mistaken)
:lol: Now I must see find out its frequency with my $15 multimeter. :lol:
Deal Addict
User avatar
Nov 3, 2004
1357 posts
97 upvotes
For $15 and the fact that it kinda looks like a Fluke, not a bad deal.
Deal Fanatic
User avatar
Oct 25, 2003
9125 posts
259 upvotes
computer01 wrote:For $15 and the fact that it kinda looks like a Fluke, not a bad deal.
It's probably a Fluke knockoff with inferior components :p But hey, $15 for a DMM with these features, you really can't go wrong.

Maybe resistance in Current mode isn't THAT high, and in Voltage mode, not quite 0 :p
Deal Addict
User avatar
Sep 15, 2003
2114 posts
191 upvotes
I don't know if I could ever truly trust a $15 meter. I guess it's ok for home use.


RideGuy
Deal Addict
Jan 23, 2002
4029 posts
35 upvotes
Hamilton
so do they actually ship? Many GTA people in thread... For home use, it would be perfect. Has to be beter than than the CT one. The CT one takes forever to settle on a measurement, but with these extra features I woulnd't mind so much.
Sr. Member
User avatar
Nov 30, 2002
525 posts
42 upvotes
Downtown Toronto
It really depends on what you mean by trust...

You should be trusting your own skills and ability, and your ability to research and learn by experiment. This may or may not demmand expensive tools...

Also, In the end your design has to be proven in functional testing anyway.

I don't mean to imply the cheap meter is "just as good", but it is the results that count.

I should add, if it doesn't have to be portable you can get an old benchtop model like the Fluke 8012A. It is just an example, but you can get one for way below $50 USD, and it does RMS measurements, it has a very low resistance mode, and a freqeuncy counter. No capacitance measurement though...
[OP]
Deal Addict
User avatar
Oct 13, 2002
2953 posts
10 upvotes
B0000rt wrote:It's probably a Fluke knockoff with inferior components :p But hey, $15 for a DMM with these features, you really can't go wrong.

Maybe resistance in Current mode isn't THAT high, and in Voltage mode, not quite 0 :p
It does not look like a Fluke at all. :) The only resemblance is the yellow colour, but even that does not match a Fluke. :D

If you trust what the silkscreen says, then it uses the ubiquitous 7106 ADC, which should not be too bad. But I can't verify since it is covered by a big blob of black stuff.

I am going to build my own 8-channel 16-bit ADC +/- 2 LSb. :) That will probably beat any Fluke. :lol: Probably get around 14 bits of usable resolution from it, or 0.3 mV. :D But then the parts cost way more than $15.
Deal Fanatic
User avatar
Oct 25, 2003
9125 posts
259 upvotes
/\ for what reason do you need an ADC :p
Deal Addict
Jan 23, 2002
4029 posts
35 upvotes
Hamilton
mrken wrote:It does not look like a Fluke at all. :) The only resemblance is the yellow colour, but even that does not match a Fluke. :D

If you trust what the silkscreen says, then it uses the ubiquitous 7106 ADC, which should not be too bad. But I can't verify since it is covered by a big blob of black stuff.

I am going to build my own 8-channel 16-bit ADC +/- 2 LSb. :) That will probably beat any Fluke. :lol: Probably get around 14 bits of usable resolution from it, or 0.3 mV. :D But then the parts cost way more than $15.
Order samples from Maxim. You should be able to get all you need for this project for free if you use an analog switch to mux the inputs.
Deal Expert
Mar 23, 2004
24746 posts
5022 upvotes
mrken wrote:It does not look like a Fluke at all. :) The only resemblance is the yellow colour, but even that does not match a Fluke. :D
Yeah I second that, and look at all those range settings, Flukes don't usually have those--they autorange :)

Top