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goodwill vs value village

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Jan 7, 2005
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goodwill vs value village

apparently all donated items at value village are available for purchase by the staff before they are displayed in the store for the public, at an employee discount,
this is where i see the managers buying up all valueable items,
to resell for profit elsewhere privately,

with this business model,
all our donations are benefiting value village managers,

i personally see this happening,
as i rarely see any items of any small value available for sale at value village,

whereas at goodwill the staff can not purchase from their stores,

with these observations,
i will not support value village with donations or patronage,
and fully support goodwill stores,

i encourage everyone to likewise support goodwill only
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Mar 8, 2002
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I personally donate everything to the Salvation Army.
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We donate all our clothes to those drop off boxes in mall parking lots for Breast Cancer Research or Diabetes.
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Jul 4, 2004
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Sibica wrote:
Nov 15th, 2008 2:03 am
We donate all our clothes to those drop off boxes in mall parking lots for Breast Cancer Research or Diabetes.
And usually these clothes are sold back to Value Village for something like $0.10 a pound. BCR just wants the dough and isn't in the thrift business. Just give your clothes to Goodwill and help those working in your community. I don't even sell stuff on RFD anymore (very rarely) and just take all my old stuff there.
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Dec 11, 2005
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It all depends on what you are trying to support.

Yes, Value Village is a for-profit company and GoodWill is a charity. However, Value Village pays a large number of non-profits for their clothing ( http://www.valuevillage.com/alliances/alliances.php ). Yes, they buy it "by the pound", however you have to remember that only about 25% of the crap put into these collection bins is even re-saleable stuff - most of it just sends up being sold in bulk to rag makers.

It totally depends on who you are trying to support who you should donate your clothes to. For me, my father, grandmother, her mother, and an uncle are all diabetic, and the odds of me becoming diabetic as I age are not in my favour - thus I always donate my clothes to the diabetees foundation box, who I know sell sit to Value Village.

Donations are a personal thing, and I don't really have as much of a personal connection to Goodwill (whose goal is to help train people for jobs) or Salvation Army (who help the homeless).
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Oct 21, 2004
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+2 avoid value village.

they are brilliant with their new "drive-through drop-off" donation places, the most convenient things for people who just wanna get rid of things quickly.

My suggestion: look up homeless shelters / homes for abused women & children / group homes, and see if you can drop stuff off. It's usually NO QUESTIONS ASKED, and you can often just drop stuff on their front porch with a note (women clothes for donation). you'll fee much better about the stuff being used right away by people who need it, and they love receiving donations (they don't have to spend their small budgets on those kinds of things). They also often accept toileteries (the ones we take from hotels and then never use!), baby items etc.
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AnnaBanana wrote:
Nov 15th, 2008 9:46 am
+2 avoid value village.

they are brilliant with their new "drive-through drop-off" donation places, the most convenient things for people who just wanna get rid of things quickly.

My suggestion: look up homeless shelters / homes for abused women & children / group homes, and see if you can drop stuff off. It's usually NO QUESTIONS ASKED, and you can often just drop stuff on their front porch with a note (women clothes for donation). you'll fee much better about the stuff being used right away by people who need it, and they love receiving donations (they don't have to spend their small budgets on those kinds of things). They also often accept toileteries (the ones we take from hotels and then never use!), baby items etc.
Great idea indeed but keep in mind some shelters for abused women and their children keep their location secret...for obvious reasons.
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Jun 5, 2003
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Sibica wrote:
Nov 15th, 2008 2:03 am
We donate all our clothes to those drop off boxes in mall parking lots for Breast Cancer Research or Diabetes.
I used to until I saw hordes of people, some driving real nice cars/suv's, going through the bins, stealing anything good and making a mess of the whole area around them :mad: . I think this is partly why a lot of malls etc. don't allow them anymore.
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Maybe I'm naive, but I don't think the managers/staff of value village aren't the type to buy up the 'good' inventory just to flip for a profit. If I was a greedy person, I think VV would be the last place I look for work.

I really like VV, it caters to people who may not be completely broke, but those who are less fortunate can get more for their dollar there.

The drive through drop off area is really convenient as well. I have no problem at all with value village.

Oh, and the reason you might not be finding what you may call good value items is because other people probably scoop those up pretty early.
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brunes wrote:
Nov 15th, 2008 8:51 am
It all depends on what you are trying to support.

Yes, Value Village is a for-profit company and GoodWill is a charity. However, Value Village pays a large number of non-profits for their clothing ( http://www.valuevillage.com/alliances/alliances.php ). Yes, they buy it "by the pound", however you have to remember that only about 25% of the crap put into these collection bins is even re-saleable stuff - most of it just sends up being sold in bulk to rag makers.

It totally depends on who you are trying to support who you should donate your clothes to. For me, my father, grandmother, her mother, and an uncle are all diabetic, and the odds of me becoming diabetic as I age are not in my favour - thus I always donate my clothes to the diabetees foundation box, who I know sell sit to Value Village.

Donations are a personal thing, and I don't really have as much of a personal connection to Goodwill (whose goal is to help train people for jobs) or Salvation Army (who help the homeless).
Don't kid yourself. Very little money is actually going to the diabetes foundation. These boxes are run by for profits with a small donation to diabetes. I too come from a family of diabetics, on both sides. I saw it kill my grandmother and my aunt. My blood sugar is elevated so I am at risk. I give cash directly to the Canadian Diabetes Association and my clothes go to Goodwill where I know it will go to charity. I hate these for profits hiding under the guise of a charity.
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May 13, 2004
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Most clothing drop-boxes are complete business operations.

Goodwill is legitimate.

Value Village does everything possible to look like a charity (with a "donation" box/station) but it is a for-profit business.

For these reasons, I gift to Goodwill or known religious charities. But I'll buy something at Variety Village if it's dirt cheap and fits what I want.
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Aug 10, 2003
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+1 - I could not have said it better
HowEver wrote:
Nov 15th, 2008 8:24 pm
Most clothing drop-boxes are complete business operations.

Goodwill is legitimate.

Value Village does everything possible to look like a charity (with a "donation" box/station) but it is a for-profit business.

For these reasons, I gift to Goodwill or known religious charities. But I'll buy something at Variety Village if it's dirt cheap and fits what I want.
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you got it bang on. ++ for goodwill
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HowEver wrote:
Nov 15th, 2008 8:24 pm
Most clothing drop-boxes are complete business operations.

Goodwill is legitimate.

Value Village does everything possible to look like a charity (with a "donation" box/station) but it is a for-profit business.

For these reasons, I gift to Goodwill or known religious charities. But I'll buy something at Variety Village if it's dirt cheap and fits what I want.
I agree 100%. I donate to Value Village on occassion, mostly if I have a lot of stuff, because their drive-in drop off is just convenient. I dislike Value Village because they aren't a charity, and they are making profit off donations people are giving, since a lot of people aren't educated and assume that they ARE a charity. I usually try to support good will more.

I'll shop at both on occassion and if I find something really good, I'll pick it up. Unfortunately, I usually find Value Village is much easier to shop at, because they are bigger & have better selection, and because everything is organized better.

I would much rather support good will though, because I know they are always giving back to the community, but I just never find anything good there.
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Jun 7, 2005
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Value Village is not a true charity, but it doesn provide a low cost alternative for people who might not be able to afford new clothing. I don't see how this is a bad thing. Goodwill stores usually have 1 or 2 volunteer staff, value village has a few at all times. They need to pay that staff somehow, and lets not forget the building lease itself.
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