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Gutting a 1954 Sidesplit - Full gut job + 500 sq ft Addition

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  • Feb 19th, 2018 2:40 pm
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Deal Guru
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Nov 18, 2005
10514 posts
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Kingston
James, regarding your solar install, I assume from previous posts here and in the microFIT thread you are installing a microFIT system.

In case you weren't already doing this....Make sure you keep all the solar panel costs separate from the rest of your reno costs. You'll be able to get a refund of the HST on the solar install and claim CCA (depreciation) of the install cost against your microFIT income going forward.
Deal Addict
Sep 2, 2004
1788 posts
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That's a really nice patio door. Good choice there. Im assuming the two ends are fixed panels?

Did you have to take encase the whole conduit in concrete? The second picture you put looks like it's inside so I wasn't sure.

Also what was the work around for the electrical wire that was drilled through your engineered trusses? Couldn't they just run them on top and pass as properly supported that way?

Sorry for all the questions! Just interested/curious...
[OP]
Deal Addict
Oct 14, 2004
1195 posts
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Toronto
JWL wrote:
Jul 4th, 2017 9:23 am
James, regarding your solar install, I assume from previous posts here and in the microFIT thread you are installing a microFIT system.

In case you weren't already doing this....Make sure you keep all the solar panel costs separate from the rest of your reno costs. You'll be able to get a refund of the HST on the solar install and claim CCA (depreciation) of the install cost against your microFIT income going forward.
Edit: Yes, it's Microfit.

Does this need to be kept separate as in a different loan? I know it is easiest to do it this way, but right now we are chewing through a second mortgage and could easily move it over to a LOC or something similar in the next few months. By the way, the panels are being mounted tomorrow.
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Oct 14, 2004
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Toronto
Capt. wrote:
Jul 4th, 2017 1:46 pm
That's a really nice patio door. Good choice there. Im assuming the two ends are fixed panels?
Yes, the two middle doors open and the two edge panels are fixed.
Did you have to take encase the whole conduit in concrete? The second picture you put looks like it's inside so I wasn't sure.
That was my bad - I fixed it. We only had to concrete encase under the driveway. That imposter photo was actually the 'stoop' for the patio door.
Also what was the work around for the electrical wire that was drilled through your engineered trusses? Couldn't they just run them on top and pass as properly supported that way?
Basically, take a 6ft 2x4 on either side of the truss and nail it with 3 1/4" nails. They also gave me a nailing pattern.
Sorry for all the questions! Just interested/curious...
Don't be sorry - I love questions. It is actually a bit boring to not get any replies when a new post is put up.
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Nov 18, 2005
10514 posts
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Kingston
James_TheVirus wrote:
Jul 4th, 2017 2:53 pm
Edit: Yes, it's Microfit.

Does this need to be kept separate as in a different loan? I know it is easiest to do it this way, but right now we are chewing through a second mortgage and could easily move it over to a LOC or something similar in the next few months. By the way, the panels are being mounted tomorrow.
According to this page on taxtips.ca "You must be able to trace borrowed money directly to the purchase of the income-producing investments".

If the loans are combined you'll need to do some calculations to show how much interest is due to the loan for the solar panels (and keep records).
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Oct 14, 2004
1195 posts
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Toronto
Has it really been a month since the last update? Well, it has been exactly one year since we moved out and started down the path of renovating. It has been a long long road, and one that all four of us will be happy to have behind us. Reno's are not easy...

Over the past month, we have been doing lots of little things. The Spray Foam company will begin their work tomorrow, so this signifies a major milestone as most of the structural and services are now in place. There are still some bulkheads to build, and many other smaller items to do...but this is major progress.

Basement:

The basement is now 90% framed which has allowed the HVAC/Plumbing and Electrical to go in. Gas lines are in, AC is hooked up, Furnace is ready, HRV lines are in, and the tankless HWH is now hung. Plumbing is progressing in the basement, although there are a lot of different water lines to be run. Another 2-3 days and my brother should have that covered off. Rob the electrical has also been busy getting all of his work done.

Inspections:

This past week, we had the HVAC, Structural and ESA inspections. The HVAC and ESA inspection passed, and I just need a letter from the engineer to signoff the Structural inspection. We will also do the plumbing once all the lines are pressure tested.

Hydro Service:

The connection of the hydro service was held up by the ESA inspection which was passed without issue. However, when I contacted Toronto Hydro, they wanted to see fire resistant plywood behind the meter base. We couldn't find anything in the Electrical Code about this...nor on the Toronto Hydro standards. When asked, all the inspector could point to was that he had heard that insurance companies wouldn't payout if this was not done. Needless to say, he wouldn't connect us without doing it. So...one $96 4x8' sheet of plywood, and we were set (I only used about $20 worth of that plywood, so I am looking to sell the other 6ft if anyone is interested).

Solar:

The solar is hooked up and ready to go. Just waiting on the new electrical service, and we will be making money while we take afternoon naps!

Schedule:

Spray foam this week; insulation the next two weeks; and then drywall will start August 28th. The kitchen company will then come and measure on Sep 6th for the cabinetry which should be installed Mid November. No surprise, but Mrs. JTV is looking forward to the kitchen being installed. She wasn't as excited about the gas lines being run...but she would miss them if we didn't put them in. :D

Found this by the old panel when we were removing it.
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Newbie
Jan 31, 2016
24 posts
1 upvote
Woodstock, ON
Been following this thread for a bit. Nice to see the progress.

Sorry if I missed this but did you complete demo yourself. What kind of ppe did you wear? Any asbestos found. P
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Feb 13, 2013
147 posts
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BC
Wow, your Reno is coming along nicely! Can't wait to see the stages that come next....drywall transforms everything and then all the pretty finishes get added.

Are you getting a bit sick of it all yet? We are nearly done a to-the studs Reno and are doing most of the work ourselves. It's definitely getting a bit old to not have any time for other persuits besides renos. I can't wait to be done.
[OP]
Deal Addict
Oct 14, 2004
1195 posts
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Toronto
Eric3511 wrote:
Aug 8th, 2017 10:06 pm
Sorry if I missed this but did you complete demo yourself. What kind of ppe did you wear? Any asbestos found. P
Thanks for following. I did most of the demo myself - with the exception of the roof. I have a full-face respirator which is awesome which I got on Amazon and use P100 filters for, and tyvek suits every once and a while.

We only had 9 by 9 asbestos tiles to deal with, and we tried not to disturb them - we just put the new floor right overtop.
[OP]
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Oct 14, 2004
1195 posts
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Toronto
christel3 wrote:
Aug 9th, 2017 11:45 am
Are you getting a bit sick of it all yet? We are nearly done a to-the studs Reno and are doing most of the work ourselves. It's definitely getting a bit old to not have any time for other persuits besides renos. I can't wait to be done.
I was sick of it about 4 months ago. I am now even more sick of it...I just want to move back in and have normal credit card bills again!
[OP]
Deal Addict
Oct 14, 2004
1195 posts
242 upvotes
Toronto
What a busy and productive month and a half. Let’s get started:

Spray Foam:

Mack from The Spray Foam Guy came and sprayed (blew?) nine inches (R50) of spray foam into the Cathedral Ceiling. While this was a pricey item, we believe it was necessary to avoid a number of issues: venting, energy efficiency, and the joist spacing was non-standard (12″OC). I will say…Mack was fantastic to work with – he forgot that it was R50 and called me as soon as he realized his mistake; owned up to it and fixed it literally by the next day. The city inspector and drywallers were really happy with the job he did…so if you ever need someone for sprayfoam, I recommend The Spray Foam Guy.

Roxul Insulation:

The best decision of the project thus far was to hire a crew to come in and put in the Roxul. Matt and the team at The Right Angle spent three very hot and itchy days installing all of the Roxul and vapour barriers. They were working on some of the hottest days in August – but it saved me about 10 days of itchiness hell, so it was well worth it! I think we ended up using about 65 bags of insulation.

Again, there were a couple of minor issues with missed boxes in the vapour barrier, and Matt came back without hesitation the day after I called him. It really is nice to work with people who care about their work.

Drywall:

Immediately following the Roxul, the team at 3D Drywall descended on our house and got to work installing drywall. I had to stay ahead of them building bulkheads, etc. which meant a lot of help from my Dad.

The drywall went up quickly, although drywalling the cathedral ceiling was no easy feat. They ended up putting their drywall lift on scaffolding then doing a dance to get it up to it’s final height; nearly 18ft in the air. They were very particular, and used the largest sheets possible to minimize the number of seams. I was impressed that they only have a pickup truck load of offcuts which is hardly anything considering the size of the area being drywalled.

Normally I don’t list company names, but given how impressed I was with all three, I thought I would include them.

Solar:

The solar panels are all ready to go – except for arguably the most important part – the meter which tracks how much hydro we are selling back to the grid. No meter, no getting paid. The good news is that it should finally be installed this week. It will be nice to finally have some money coming in rather than just going out.

Exterior:

Some of the exterior has arrived, and will begin to be installed on Oct 1. It is a product by James Hardie which is a cement siding. We will also be using FusionStone on certain parts of the front. Hopefully everything matches and looks good at the front when we are done.

Kitchen:

Where do I start with this one? Mrs. JTV is most excited about the kitchen; so I often hear about it, but we haven’t been able to do much about it…until now. Last week, we signed off on the final version of the kitchen, selected the handles, and they came to measure. This means that the week of Nov 13th, we will have cabinets on site and starting to be installed. We bought from a custom kitchen shop, so they do all of the installation of the cabinets which means less for me to do.

Moving Date:

We are giving notice at the end of the month that we will vacate the rental unit by the end of November. We confirmed with the building inspector that we can move back in any time…as it is a reno and not a new build (therefore does not require an occupancy permit). This means that some jobs will not get done before we move in…but that is ok – we will be back into our home and not paying rent.

Stairs:

The new stairs are in and look good. We will just have the painter paint them and we should be good then.
Member
Jan 9, 2013
372 posts
163 upvotes
St Catharines
Bump! Any more pictures? This was an awesome read, thanks for all the posts!
[OP]
Deal Addict
Oct 14, 2004
1195 posts
242 upvotes
Toronto
2kfire wrote:
Feb 13th, 2018 9:57 pm
Bump! Any more pictures? This was an awesome read, thanks for all the posts!
Only because someone asked. :) Honestly, the past 4 months have been very busy. We moved in at the end of November, but still have a few things left to do.

Drywall:
Drywall went up in about 3 weeks. As the weather got colder, we noticed some major cracking in the cathedral ceiling. The structural engineer came and reviewed everything, but all seemed to be in order. After some research, it was put down to environmental factors. So, we are waiting until the spring to fix all of the cracks. It is really only in a few spots and as a result, we didn't paint the main room yet.

Exterior:
We had a crew of 3-4 guys here for about 5 weeks doing the exterior. They hadn't done James Hardie before, but they read all of the instructions. It ended up taking about 2 weeks longer than I expected and they were on T&M, so it ended up costing the same as any siding contractors would have charged. Overall I am happy with the job they did and it did cost the same (I thought I was being smart), so I can't complain.

Kitchen:
We had a custom cabinet company come and install the kitchen and bathroom vanity. We paid a premium price (almost $46k for cabinets and quartz counters) and were pleased with the kitchen and vanity, but they didn't do a number of small finishing touches that I would have expected. For example, they didn't put a backsplash on the vanity (that's fine), but also didn't caulk once the countertop was set in place. We also have kick plate vents - and they just left a big hole in the kickplate rather than including the vent cover. Given that it is a custom size (exactly 4"), there is nothing that is standard off the shelf. They will then 'give me a price' on painting the custom grates once we have them made. Honestly, we were very happy up until these and a few more finishing touches.

Trim/Doors:
All the trim and doors were done by the same guys who did the exterior. It looks good, however, during the first really cold snap at Christmas, the windows in the older section of house got mold all over the jamb. We believe it had to do with the fact that the windows are pushed to the outside wall, and as a result, has a cold air gap. We insulated it, but forgot to put a vapour barrier over this one section. It means that I will be ripping out the trim and jamb on about 8 windows. We will be adding extra insulation just in case, adding a vapour barrier and painting/sealing the windows.

Electrical:
We have passed the final ESA inspection. I believe that the only thing missed was the HRV needed to be on an arc-fault breaker. Other than that, the only quibble is the back light where we were going to put a motion light happened to be put on the same string as the rest of the exterior lights. Unfortunately, this means that the motion light would only work when the outside lights were on. As a result, I guess we won't be having a motion light back there.

Front Door:
We put in a Dorplex door...boy was that a chore. Brock told us it would be 42" even including the jamb. Turns out that excluded the jamb, and of course, the opening was 1/8" too small. It took 3 days (I was crazy sick!) to pull of the exterior OSB, pull out the insulation, restructure the header, then put it all back. The interior was already drywalled, so it was not a fun job.

Hardwood:
My dad and I laid 1900 sq ft of hardwood over about 8 days. It took 5 days straight to do the big room which is almost 1200 sq ft in and of itself. We used Twelve Oaks and it was decent stuff, but it was easy to take a good size piece out of it when hitting it with the rubber mallet.

Whats Next:
Finish up the bedrooms - we have to finish painting and getting the rooms set.
Driveway - we have to find a company to pave the driveway as it was torn up when we buried the electrical.
Landscaping - We have to landscape and put in the front pathway.
Backsplash - we need to put in the backsplash in the kitchen - we were quoted about $800 from the tiler, but it seemed expensive, so we will get around to it.
Fireplace - we need to clad the fireplace, so we will use a product called Dekko.
Gates/Fences - we have two small fences that need to be replace - maybe 20 ft of fencing in all
Shingle - Need to reshingle over the back overhang. It was the only roof now which does not have a metal roof. We probably want to replace it in 5-10 years, do there is no sense in putting a metal roof on it.

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