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Gutting a 1954 Sidesplit - Full gut job + 500 sq ft Addition

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  • Feb 19th, 2018 2:40 pm
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Deal Addict
Sep 2, 2004
1786 posts
104 upvotes
Thanks for taking the time to share all the details and photos with us. That's a major, major amount of work you have going on there. Keep em coming!
[OP]
Deal Addict
Oct 14, 2004
1195 posts
242 upvotes
Toronto
Also, just a reminder if you are taking on a project of this magnitude, and subbing it out that there are very real workplace rules that you must follow. The Ministry of Labour drive around and will randomly show up on your worksite.

Some of the things to know:
1) You must register your project with the MOL
2) If you are hiring more than one trade, then you are likely the constructor on the project and therefore hold the liability
3) You must get a Form 1000 from all trades on your site
4) All proper PPE must be worn - hard hats, safety glasses, steel toed boots
5) You must ensure that your workers have the proper working-at-heights training and are properly tied off when working over 10ft or using approved scaffolding
6) Guardrails must be put in place
7) All worksites must have access to a washroom for the guys/gals doing the work
8) etc, etc. etc. Read the OHSA and understand what it means. There is a lot in there and you need to have certain documentation and things on site (first aid kit, directions to nearest hospital, etc.)

I had my good friends at the MOL stop by this week. Unfortunately, I got two orders - one for a missing mid-rail and toe-kick plate on a railing (I had a top railing in place), and not having a bathroom onsite. We gutted the basement bathroom just before Christmas to allow us to trench the basement and were planning to put one in once the floor was concreted again...but unfortunately there needs to be a bathroom onsite at all times for the workers (even though we are doing a lot of the work ourselves right now - it is when any trades will be coming, even if for an hour at a time). I have a week to get either a porta-potty or a temporary bathroom setup.
Deal Fanatic
Jul 4, 2004
7269 posts
576 upvotes
Toronto
James_TheVirus wrote:
Jan 27th, 2017 6:32 pm
Also, just a reminder if you are taking on a project of this magnitude, and subbing it out that there are very real workplace rules that you must follow. The Ministry of Labour drive around and will randomly show up on your worksite.

Some of the things to know:
1) You must register your project with the MOL
2) If you are hiring more than one trade, then you are likely the constructor on the project and therefore hold the liability
3) You must get a Form 1000 from all trades on your site
4) All proper PPE must be worn - hard hats, safety glasses, steel toed boots
5) You must ensure that your workers have the proper working-at-heights training and are properly tied off when working over 10ft or using approved scaffolding
6) Guardrails must be put in place
7) All worksites must have access to a washroom for the guys/gals doing the work
8) etc, etc. etc. Read the OHSA and understand what it means. There is a lot in there and you need to have certain documentation and things on site (first aid kit, directions to nearest hospital, etc.)

I had my good friends at the MOL stop by this week. Unfortunately, I got two orders - one for a missing mid-rail and toe-kick plate on a railing (I had a top railing in place), and not having a bathroom onsite. We gutted the basement bathroom just before Christmas to allow us to trench the basement and were planning to put one in once the floor was concreted again...but unfortunately there needs to be a bathroom onsite at all times for the workers (even though we are doing a lot of the work ourselves right now - it is when any trades will be coming, even if for an hour at a time). I have a week to get either a porta-potty or a temporary bathroom setup.
Meh. Ampot is like $200 a month, no big deal. One of my contractors got dinged for not putting a heater in their portapotty tho. I thought that was special. So was requiring the painter to wear a hard hat 2 weeks before move in (tell me there's no quota! lol).

But other common ones I see or hear of: all extension cords have to have their grounds intact (many people have ones with missing grounds or the sheath is damaged) and saws having their guards on (had a framer that had to go buy a new saw since theirs hadn't had a guard for a loooooong time).
[OP]
Deal Addict
Oct 14, 2004
1195 posts
242 upvotes
Toronto
Drew_W wrote:
Jan 27th, 2017 9:31 pm
Meh. Ampot is like $200 a month, no big deal. One of my contractors got dinged for not putting a heater in their portapotty tho. I thought that was special. So was requiring the painter to wear a hard hat 2 weeks before move in (tell me there's no quota! lol).
$200 per month plus $300 drop off. So $1500 if we take the next 6mths to finish. We are just plumbing in a temp one in the basement right beside the water meter to tide us over.

Roofers also need to wear hardhats...because I guess bird-stuff will fall from the sky??? :)
Jr. Member
Dec 13, 2011
106 posts
18 upvotes
GMA
Great thread and good job on the renos!

I saw you posted a summary of the budget spent so far on your project.
I was wondering if you have an idea of the cost of the 500sqf addition only?
[OP]
Deal Addict
Oct 14, 2004
1195 posts
242 upvotes
Toronto
Phatjoe wrote:
Jan 31st, 2017 10:14 am
I saw you posted a summary of the budget spent so far on your project.
I was wondering if you have an idea of the cost of the 500sqf addition only?
That is very difficult to break out. For example, we added the front addition, removed the roof over the existing house, then spanned both the old and new with one roof. For the framing, they also framed the walls on the new section and some of the older sections. Thus, it is very difficult to break out many of the costs. We also had to upgrade the furnace - can that be attributed to the addition, or the fact that the new ceiling height is 19ft at the peak which was a design choice.

One thing that I think I can break out is the foundation which was approx 25k. That including excavation, footings, weeping tile, 5ft hollow block wall, and then an additional 542 sq ft of slab. As it was slab on grade - it did not include excavation of a basement and it was only 5ft high. I think it was about 54 linear feet of wall plus the front porch which was another 18 linear feet.

Sorry I couldn't be of more help.

Keep in mind - when you do an addition, especially if the house is old, you may want to reconfigure the older house. If you are adding a second story, the ceiling below and some of the walls will need to be opened up, so there still may be work that needs to be done unless you are adding on a simple sunroom or similar.
[OP]
Deal Addict
Oct 14, 2004
1195 posts
242 upvotes
Toronto
Lots has happened since the last update. Where do I begin?
  1. The footings and wall for the new furnace room have been erected.
  2. Three new steel jack posts have replaced the large cinder block supports. These will now fit nicely inside a 2×4 wall which should help to clear up the basement and make it comfortable.
  3. It took months, but the roofing material is on site and one side of the house is just about done!!
  4. The basement has been fully planned out and many of the drains are now in place.
  5. A temporary washroom has been setup in the basement, and let me tell you, it is comfortable!
  6. The main beam has been cut into two sections. The engineer requested that this be done due to the two unequal lengths, and the amount of deflection when there is a snowload.
  7. Upstairs, the majority of the interior walls have been framed, and the HVAC has been roughed in with many of the holes cut for the return air vents and the supplies.
  8. Last but not least, we have a new gas line and meter (almost forgot about that)!
When the inspector was by last week, he recommended installing a backwater valve. Essentially, if the city sewers back up, a small valve prevents the sewage backing up into our basement. The actual cost of the valve was about $150 and was well worth the cost. It is almost a small insurance policy against flooding the basement in the future.
[OP]
Deal Addict
Oct 14, 2004
1195 posts
242 upvotes
Toronto
Jackposts/Wall Demolition Into Furnace Room:
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The Roof (FINALLY!):
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Gas Line:
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Mr. Bobcat:
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Jr. Member
Dec 13, 2011
106 posts
18 upvotes
GMA
James_TheVirus wrote:
Feb 1st, 2017 8:12 am
That is very difficult to break out. For example, we added the front addition, removed the roof over the existing house, then spanned both the old and new with one roof. For the framing, they also framed the walls on the new section and some of the older sections. Thus, it is very difficult to break out many of the costs. We also had to upgrade the furnace - can that be attributed to the addition, or the fact that the new ceiling height is 19ft at the peak which was a design choice.

One thing that I think I can break out is the foundation which was approx 25k. That including excavation, footings, weeping tile, 5ft hollow block wall, and then an additional 542 sq ft of slab. As it was slab on grade - it did not include excavation of a basement and it was only 5ft high. I think it was about 54 linear feet of wall plus the front porch which was another 18 linear feet.

Sorry I couldn't be of more help.

Keep in mind - when you do an addition, especially if the house is old, you may want to reconfigure the older house. If you are adding a second story, the ceiling below and some of the walls will need to be opened up, so there still may be work that needs to be done unless you are adding on a simple sunroom or similar.
Thanks for your response.

We were contemplating doing an addition to the back of our house, it would be a open 12X30 living area three stories high. basement/main floor/second floor.
i'll have to see with the city for the back allowance and contact a few contractors for some quotes. Our budget isnt as high as yours...
[OP]
Deal Addict
Oct 14, 2004
1195 posts
242 upvotes
Toronto
Phatjoe wrote:
Feb 3rd, 2017 7:27 pm
Thanks for your response.

We were contemplating doing an addition to the back of our house, it would be a open 12X30 living area three stories high. basement/main floor/second floor.
i'll have to see with the city for the back allowance and contact a few contractors for some quotes. Our budget isnt as high as yours...
Check out the City of Toronto Zoning website:
http://map.toronto.ca/maps/map.jsp?app=ZBL_CONSULT

Just type in your address, and you should be able to bring up the setbacks for your property. That should give you a decent idea, then I would try going to see the building department to see if there is anything weird like the average of the neighbours (think this only applies to the front), land coverage, etc.

Our budget is high - but admittedly, it includes a lot of things that are not required - we just wanted them. For example, we are putting on solar, have a large appliances budget, etc. Just don't underestimate how much things will cost. Every trip I make to HD to pickup little things seems to be a minimum of $100.
Jr. Member
User avatar
Sep 25, 2003
170 posts
16 upvotes
Scarborough
Great to see the progress.

I noticed that your rear windows are mounted in line with 2x furring material attached directly on your exterior brick. Are you planning to stucco or add siding?
[OP]
Deal Addict
Oct 14, 2004
1195 posts
242 upvotes
Toronto
zhewie wrote:
Feb 5th, 2017 2:07 pm
Great to see the progress.

I noticed that your rear windows are mounted in line with 2x furring material attached directly on your exterior brick. Are you planning to stucco or add siding?
We will be putting up James Hardie siding. If you are not familiar, it is essentially a cement siding product. We plan to do it in a blue with white accent trim. Hopefully it turns out ok...
[OP]
Deal Addict
Oct 14, 2004
1195 posts
242 upvotes
Toronto
The Roof:

Today (Family Day), the roofers were finally able to return to continue installing the roof. They managed to get the rear of the house on about 3 weeks ago, but have been held up due to ice and snow. Due to the recent spike in temperatures, the snow has melted and we are going full-speed ahead. The roofers were able to get about half of the front on today (sorry for the lack of pics…but the lighting is difficult at the front of the house).

Hopefully the roof will be completed by the end of the week – I think they have about two days worth of work left…but it’s going to rain tomorrow, so maybe Wednesday.

HVAC:

Last Friday, we received the spiral pipe for the HVAC which will be installed under the slab-on-grade. We have been waiting about 3 weeks for this pipe (holding everything up!) as it was a completely custom order direct from the manufacturer. It had to be dipped in a special coating to ensure it is watertight; corrosion-, decay-, and mildew resistant. All of the couplings should arrive by Wednesday.

The HVAC Contractor should be there tomorrow to start laying out all of the ducts. This is a massive step and will hopefully mean that we can pour the slab next week. This makes me happy! I have piled a lot of gravel (which is now thawed) beside each of the trenches to make it easy for the contractor.


Structural Stuff:

One item that had been put off for a while was the cutting of the beam (as the two spans are significantly different lengths – 10ft and 26ft). If only 3300lbs was applied to the 26ft side of the beam, there was potential that the post at the other end could lift off the ground.

As a result, the framing contractor came back to cut the beam. Never take your contractors word for anything – this is what I found upon closer inspection:
Before - 26ft Beam is on the left side, and small black mark is the mid-point of the post
After - Two bolts in place, and almost centered on the post

As you can see in the first photo, the contractor had managed to get the 26ft beam just 2 inches on the post, and the 10ft beam 6 inches on it. I ended up repositioning the post such that it was almost centered and putting some better bolts in it to nicely secure everything. Keep in mind, this is 18ft in the air and the post weighs probably about 500lbs.
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With the post issue out of the way, the structural engineer stopped by to review the framing. He found a couple of deficiencies which will need to be addressed before we can get the structural inspection.

But, on Saturday, I managed to pull down the temporary support posts – so now it is in the final configuration from a structural perspective. Taking down the support posts was no easy task – it was still bearing some weight and was very tall!
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New Toy:

With all the work that still needs to be completed – there will be a lot of drilling of concrete. So, to make things easier, I picked up a new toy – a cordless rotary hammer drill. A rotary hammer drill is different than a hammer drill as it drills concrete about 15x faster. I am looking forward to using this thing.
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Deal Addict
May 23, 2009
1700 posts
477 upvotes
Mississauga
Why did you have to run a new gas line?
[OP]
Deal Addict
Oct 14, 2004
1195 posts
242 upvotes
Toronto
bubuski wrote:
Feb 20th, 2017 8:42 pm
Why did you have to run a new gas line?
Our old gas meter was on the side of the garage. During the next phase of the reno (in 5 yrs), we plan to knock the garage down. As a result, we decided that it was better to relocate the gas line now to have it in a central spot close to where the manifold will go in meaning less pipe everywhere. Once it entered the house, our old line snaked through the back pool house, garage, breezeway, basement and out to the pool/bbq.

We also needed a bigger meter - the existing one was only rated for 225k BTU whereas we are putting in close to 550k BTU's worth of gas burning power. :)

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