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Gutting a 1954 Sidesplit - Full gut job + 500 sq ft Addition

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  • Feb 19th, 2018 2:40 pm
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[OP]
Deal Addict
Oct 14, 2004
1195 posts
242 upvotes
Toronto
It has been a very busy few weeks preparing for the slab pour...the weather has been cooperating off-and-on. As you may or may not know, the main floor is a big concrete slab. Underneath, we have had to run HVAC, electrical, gas lines and plumbing in preparation for the various services that will be required.


HVAC:
We have run the Polyvinyl Coated pipe made by Flexmaster under the slab which prevents mildew, rust etc. and is really strong so that the concrete does not crush it when poured. It took a little bit of finagling to get all of the registers in the right spot, but our heating contractor has been absolutely fantastic - they came back and fixed any issues literally next day (even working late to get it done!). The section under the slab is now ready for the big pour and has been inspected by the City Inspector.

Electrical:
The electrician came and ran conduit to a number of subpanels. Due to the length of the house (60ft long!) and the lack of access to a number of areas - we are planning to use 3 subpanels. One to service the kitchen, one to service the front entrance/living/dining room and one to service the mechanical room. The conduit is now in the floor and we will pull wires through once all the framing is up and concrete is in place. The ESA came by to inspect the conduit...and all was a pass.

Plumbing:
My awesome plumber (aka my brother) has been working over the past few months to install all of the required drains. This has been fairly intricate due to the number of fixtures that we are planning in the basement. We have the washer, shower, bath tub, vanity, two floor drains, laundry sink and of course a toilet. So, this meant a lot of work. This has all passed inspection by the City Inspector.

Backfilling:
With all of the inspections out of the way, we had to backfill all of the channels we created for all of the above services. My dad came down to help...and we managed to move in about 15 yards of gravel over two days. I unfortunately got the recycled crush, rather than clear gravel, so it had to thaw before being moved. I won't make that mistake again!
Concrete Slab:

The concrete slab should be poured Tuesday if all goes according to plan and the weather is not too cold. This is a MASSIVE milestone as it will allow us to get moving to finish the framing and install the subfloor. It will also mean that we can run scaffolding around the area on wheels and make everything easier.

Framing:
The structural engineer came to verify the framing that was done last October. Normally a structural inspection is done once all of the HVAC and plumbing is installed to ensure that no structure was cut in the process. The engineer noted several deficiencies so I went back to my framing contractor to get them fixed. At the same time, I also asked for a quote on the front entrance way (part of which was in his original contract) and the new furnace room. The quote came back at $7500 which is a lot for 2-3 days of work. As a result, I sent him a nastygram essentially saying that you either come and complete your original scope of work for the quoted cost, or you provide a rebate. I have a small hold back...but not the amount to cover all of the deficiencies. To his credit, he will be back week after next to complete the deficiencies. His big issue is that he has had a falling-out with the crew who did the work on my place due to not coming back to correct deficiencies - go figure.

I have two other quotes for the other work and have come in much lower (one at $3k and one at 5k). I am leaning towards just doing the work myself as it wasn't in the original budget and it would allow for a few more finishing details later on in the project.

What's Next:
  1. Pouring the concrete floor - should be this Tuesday.
  2. Frame the Front Entrance Way and Furnace Room
  3. Install the back patio door :)
  4. Rough-in rest of HVAC, Plumbing and Electrical

I will upload pics later today.
[OP]
Deal Addict
Oct 14, 2004
1195 posts
242 upvotes
Toronto
Here are some pics:

HVAC Install:
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Electrical Outlet in Slab:
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Backfilling:
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Deal Fanatic
User avatar
Mar 31, 2008
9704 posts
1308 upvotes
Toronto
Wow. Great job. Good to hear of the progress and the picture. Really gives a great perspective on the work involved. Looks like you'll get a break on the weather so hopefully it goes smooth.
[OP]
Deal Addict
Oct 14, 2004
1195 posts
242 upvotes
Toronto
It has been a busy week, both personally and in the reno-world that consumes our everyday. Things are progressing, but never as quickly as one would like.

Last Monday, the slab was poured which means we now have one continuous concrete floor on the main level and all of the drain channels filled in the basement. This is a massive milestone – it was holding up a lot of work, but was hampered by the weather (ground kept freezing). Our contractor ended up contracting for a concrete pump and we ended up pouring 14.54cu yds of cement. It was pretty cool – the trucks mix it as-needed, so there is no waste and no need to worry about it being too dry when delivered.

On Wednesday, we had a truckload of materials show up. Essentially, it was everything required for framing the rest of the areas (furnace room & entrance way) and the laying of the subfloor. The truck brought 67 sheets of 3/4″ plywood – 75lbs each and had to be moved into the house. Luckily, my parents came down to help move everything.

Thursday, my brother came and roughed in the drains for the upstairs bathroom. It looks good.

This weekend, I managed to get some framing done in the furnace room. My nailgun died on Saturday (it needs a $20 part), so I ended up just going and buying a new one to ensure that the progress continued.

During the past few rain storms, we have noticed some dampness where the old laundry room used to be. We put it down to being damp in the laundry room, but it looks like we have a collapsed weeping tile or something similar. As a result, our foundation guy will be coming to dig along the exterior of the house at the back to properly waterproof and install a new section of weeping tile.

Other than that – we have an appointment next weekend at the kitchen place. I think Mrs. James_TheVirus is looking forward to it…
[OP]
Deal Addict
Oct 14, 2004
1195 posts
242 upvotes
Toronto
Here are some pics from the last update now that imgur is working again:

Pouring the Slab
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Supplies for framing front entrance way/furnace room and subfloor:
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Framing the Furnace Room:
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Moisture in the basement:
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Last edited by James_TheVirus on Apr 4th, 2017 9:01 am, edited 1 time in total.
[OP]
Deal Addict
Oct 14, 2004
1195 posts
242 upvotes
Toronto
Here is an interesting anecdote - if I do not finish everything by September, then I will no longer be able to keep my current home insurance. This means that all siding etc. will need to be on. Truthfully, I see us being moved in by then, but not all of the exterior work done.

Apparently home insurance companies only like to insure houses under construction for up to a year. Crazy to think that everything will be fixed - new plumbing, new electrical, new roof, new backwater valve and they deem it to be a higher risk. But can't do much about it...
Member
Jan 14, 2012
250 posts
22 upvotes
KITCHENER
Quick question---why did you cut your basement floor to install hvac? Could it not have gone through the ceiling?
[OP]
Deal Addict
Oct 14, 2004
1195 posts
242 upvotes
Toronto
Supperfly wrote:
Apr 4th, 2017 10:36 am
Quick question---why did you cut your basement floor to install hvac? Could it not have gone through the ceiling?
Hi Supperfly, it is a sidesplit, so imagine you drew a line through the center of the house: one half we have a basement and bedrooms above, and then on the other half, we just have the main floor sitting on the ground.

On that mainfloor section - it is very large with a high ceiling. We could have potentially put in a massive bulkhead all the way around...but that would have looked silly and would have been difficult for such a large space. To give you an idea, at the furnace, we have a 14" diameter pipe heading out under the concrete.

We could have also done radiant heated floors, but then we still would have run ducts for AC. We also looked at running a duct right along the center of the roof, but it was thrown out as you would still need to direct the air towards the windows which would have meant many offshoots and it would have looked unbalanced.

What we should have done was knocked the whole thing down and started over. It would have cost another ~200k but would have been a lot easier and faster to build. We then would have had a full basement. Oh well, no going back now.
Deal Addict
Dec 24, 2007
1571 posts
223 upvotes
Toronto
Excellent work JTV!

You have done a lot to this house and it is slowly taking shape.

Yes, you are right that knocking it down would have probably been easier and faster to finish.

We all live and learn but your progress has been amazing and this thread always grabs my attention to see your updated progress.

Cheers and hope to see more pics soon!
Thread started in 2016 - 1927 fully gutted and renovated 2 storey detached home in the big T.O. - small projects still in progress.

RFD priceless!
[OP]
Deal Addict
Oct 14, 2004
1195 posts
242 upvotes
Toronto
Wow, thanks for the post badass. I always love hearing from people who are renovating and how they are making out - I also enjoyed your thread and hopefully others will document their renos as it can be an immense depth of knowledge. It also shows how difficult it can be...and how much work it is!
[OP]
Deal Addict
Oct 14, 2004
1195 posts
242 upvotes
Toronto
There is lots of good news in this update…the warm weather is making everything easier. I can see us moving back into the house any day now…(sorry Mrs. JTV, I meant any month now).

With the concrete in, work has now shifted to ensuring that everything is ready to pass the structural inspection. Basically, this inspection ensures that all of the main systems have been roughed in and all of the framing is complete. The inspector is looking to make sure that the structure of the building is solid and to ensure that the structure has not been ‘modified’ with small little hacks. With any luck, we should be there in a few short weeks. Once this stage is complete, we be ready to insulate and begin drywall.

The roof is now complete* (sorry, I forgot to take a final pic). It took a long time, but it looks great. All of the flashings and snow guards are complete* which took a long time to get finished up, but looks great. I will try and get a pic for the next update. There are a couple of minor defects that need to be fixed, but I consider it complete.

There was a small wet spot in the basement floor that wouldn’t dry out. We chipped up the floor and found that 1″ below the surface, it turned to sand. Most likely it absorbed some water during the demo in the fall (when the roof was off) or some snow melt off boots in the winter and the dampness was migrating to the dryside (floor) in the spring.

We have finished the furnace room, completed the entrance way, and started to lay the subfloor. However, we couldn’t get very far with it as the concrete slab-on-grade was a little uneven and had to even things out and let it dry.
[OP]
Deal Addict
Oct 14, 2004
1195 posts
242 upvotes
Toronto
Pics:

Wet Spot in Basement:
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Evening the Floor:
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Building the Entrance Way:
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Old Landing Being Demo'd:
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Member
Apr 10, 2017
466 posts
155 upvotes
Very nice! Excited on the final product!

btw, I can't help but worry for your security. This is pretty much giving away the public a blueprint of the entire home. Just something that crossed my mind and for you to consider.
Member
Jun 11, 2010
399 posts
178 upvotes
ottawa
Biscayne05 wrote:
Apr 18th, 2017 10:59 pm
Very nice! Excited on the final product!

btw, I can't help but worry for your security. This is pretty much giving away the public a blueprint of the entire home. Just something that crossed my mind and for you to consider.
I'd imagine anyone smart enough to use that information to their advantage would also not be the ones robbing the house unless this guy shows us bars of gold in a safe in a certain location...

Ps. Love following this thread OP! I always enjoy seeing it pop up on the top to see how far you've gotten.

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