Careers

Has anyone applied to CSIS for intelligence Officer?

Sr. Member
Nov 15, 2008
800 posts
211 upvotes
Lemig0s wrote:
Jan 12th, 2015 11:29 pm
Im watching Homeland and it made me want to work for the CSIS lmao. Imagine infiltrating ISIS, befriend with their leader and behead him all of a sudden, take his head and run to your plane and bring the head to Harper and Obama.
Prepare yourself for the excitement of pushing paper.

"The fact is that, despite the sleek videos, the job for CSIS’s newbies can be mind-numbingly boring. ...Once you get inside CSIS, the carefully crafted artifice reflected in this batch of videos crumbles. Disappointment and disillusionment set in."

http://www.thestar.com/opinion/editoria ... tment.html
Deal Guru
Aug 22, 2011
13967 posts
3523 upvotes
Ottawa
I don't know, giving your consent to be 100% exposed and monitored for the rest of your life, doesn't sit well with me.
Not that it's any better, when they are doing it without your knowledge!
Deal Addict
User avatar
Nov 13, 2010
4632 posts
375 upvotes
Scarborough
Lemig0s wrote:
Jan 12th, 2015 11:29 pm
Im watching Homeland and it made me want to work for the CSIS lmao. Imagine infiltrating ISIS, befriend with their leader and behead him all of a sudden, take his head and run to your plane and bring the head to Harper and Obama.
and then be a drain on taxpayer money due to PTSD, stress, emotional issues, etc ?? LOL
Deal Addict
Oct 16, 2013
1583 posts
340 upvotes
Toronto
Most spy jobs are desk bound and not like TV.
Deal Addict
User avatar
Dec 29, 2005
4278 posts
543 upvotes
I can't believe some of the questions they ask.

Some are against anti-discrimination labour laws.

How do they get away with this?
Deal Addict
Mar 27, 2004
2178 posts
174 upvotes
Toronto
mystery wrote:
Jan 13th, 2015 9:10 pm
I can't believe some of the questions they ask.

Some are against anti-discrimination labour laws.

How do they get away with this?
They want to make sure you are loyal to Canada, and not crazy.
1% listing commission only.

Platinum award winner.
Sr. Member
User avatar
Feb 24, 2013
577 posts
105 upvotes
none of your busines…
nikita4 wrote:
May 8th, 2013 9:35 pm
You know that you are not supposed to disclose all this information...you have signed a confidentiality agreement regarding the selection process. You could be sue for disclosing all that stuff over the web...just saying...
Be afraid. The big bad boogie man is gonna get ya. LOL. Being prepared for the interview process when job hunting is what more often than not helps you land the position.
Jr. Member
User avatar
Oct 13, 2011
188 posts
35 upvotes
Montr
DealSeeker3000 wrote:
Jan 14th, 2015 11:39 am
Be afraid. The big bad boogie man is gonna get ya. LOL. Being prepared for the interview process when job hunting is what more often than not helps you land the position.
That's not the point. It's an agreement you sign before the interview. You are free to do whatever you want, but I think it should be reminded.
Deal Addict
Oct 1, 2004
3633 posts
209 upvotes
Toronto
summerbreeze1 wrote:
Apr 7th, 2013 12:20 pm
I applied for two positions, including intelligence officer, back in november. I have a masters degree, speak two foreign languages and have several public and private sector internships, and I have heard nothing from them at all. Really surprised.
Why are you surprised? There's at least 10 of you graduating with the same resume as you in every school in the country?
Sr. Member
Sep 23, 2011
639 posts
349 upvotes
LAVAL
greg123 wrote:
Jan 14th, 2015 6:04 pm
Why are you surprised? There's at least 10 of you graduating with the same resume as you in every school in the country?
but the guy has private and public sector INTERNSHIPS though!
Sr. Member
Nov 15, 2008
800 posts
211 upvotes
Lemig0s wrote:
Jan 14th, 2015 9:31 pm
but the guy has private and public sector INTERNSHIPS though!
I think the non-response is explained by CSIS's policy that they don't want to hire people who are stupid enough to work for free.
Newbie
Dec 14, 2016
5 posts
2 upvotes
Toronto
Mastercraft wrote:
May 8th, 2013 2:35 am
Let's bump this thread instead of creating a new one ... here is what I know.

The recruitment process is the worst process ever !
First, you have to ship all these documents :
1- application for employment completed (3 copies)
2- resume (3 copies)
3- personnel screening (easy) : http://www.tbs-sct.gc.ca/tbsf-fsct/330-23-eng.pdf
4- security clearance form (not fun) : http://www.tbs-sct.gc.ca/tbsf-fsct/330-60-eng.pdf (5 copies!)
5- drivers licence (2 photocopies)
6- birth certificate (2 photocopies)
7- citizenship certificate (if born outside Canada)
8- marriage certificate (if applicable) (2 photocopies)
9- divorce or separation documents (if applicable) (2 photocopies)
10- education documents for highest level of education, as well as any documents supporting special qualifications (2 photocopies)
11- official transcripts forwarded directly to them by the post-secondary institutions attended ($)
12- 3 recent reference letters signed, to be provided by references, who are not family (3 copies) ... can't be the same people as on form 330-60 (see step 4)
13- abuse or illegal substance form signed
14- 6 recent & identical photographs : face only

The step 4 is the worst.
And this is just the start.

You will also have many interviews-tests, I might forget some :
0- phone interview : why are you interested in working for SCRS, etc.
1- technical interview : in fact it's not technical at all, the only technical element is that you have to tell them exactly how many years you worked on each technology, the rest is classic blablabla ...
2- admissibility interview : not funny again, they ask you very personal questions like :
- drug use : in depth, yes even as teenager, even drinking use
- internet use : what kind of website, how long each day
- family stuff : behavior, history
- small offenses : stealing stuff, drunk driving
3- 1000 questions true-false (3 hours) : stupid stuff like from "sometimes, I hear voices" to "I like science books" and "I like to play pranks to animals" ...
I think they try to categorize people as either : detail oriented, goal oriented, people oriented, etc.
See http://www.colorfulleadership.info/pape ... adrant.htm
They also take your finger prints.
4- psycho interview : using step 3 answers + asking the same questions as step 2 (yeah again!) ...
Again, they insist on having complete answers, they want to know every damn thing you stole in your life, even as a kid.
They ask you questions like : what does your family (or friends ) reproach you (sometimes) ... what they would like you to improve ...
5- security interview
6- polygraph (lie detector)

Here are the key elements about the process :
- at any time during the process, they can decide you don't fit
- they are 2 parts in the process, the security clearance and the hiring process, but they don't clearly tell you which interview is for which process
- you are only a number, they have many candidates
- they don't seem to care about your time and confidentiality :
- instead of making copies themselves, they ask you to do it ... 5 copies ... seriously ?
- instead of bringing you once for one day, each interview is on a different week
- instead of evaluating your skills first, they start the security process early, so you do both even if not required in the end ...
- they ask you for everything you did "bad" in your life, imagine the worst interview questions, they ask them all
- from the start, they ask you to tell the truth (lie detector at the end) and to answer every damn personal question, so even if you are not chosen at the end, you gave a lot of information for nothing
to put you at ease, they tell you nobody is perfect

I'm not sure of the perfect way to pass all these steps but here are few thoughts :
- don't start this process if you are not highly motivated
- don't expect too much from this process

- let's hope you were a perfect teenager (a nerd) and that you are still pretty boring (but not too much because they seem to like people-oriented and sportsmen candidates)
- otherwise, don't be afraid to lie, but be constant, take notes because they do and you will forget what you said weeks ago, remember that they can't verify 99% of your answers and that the lie detector is just a stupid tool)
- even if hard, try to be as honest as possible while saying as little as possible
- always try to look as perfect as possible even if they ask you so much stuff
- try to look balanced so they can't categorize you
This seems very detailed and fairly recent! I wonder if Mastercraft got hired or how far he or she got into the process. Too bad no helpful info about interviews though. I bet most people (including Mastercraft?) get cut at the interview stages including psychological.
Newbie
Dec 14, 2016
5 posts
2 upvotes
Toronto
240sxer wrote:
Jan 12th, 2015 11:06 pm
Just a small tip to everyone posting here thinking they're helping others apply and "make it through the process"; Please stop? Considering the last step of the process involves questions such as: "Have you ever researched how to pass this process, what is involves or how to cheat it", this would be the LAST thread I would want to read if I wish to end up with a career at CSIS or CSEC.

Strongly suggest you guys knock it off and let people go through the system as it was intended and may the best candidate succeed.
That’s a standard question on all polygraphs. If you say no they assume you lied and ask you what you know about it. If you say yes they want specific examples. Mostly to check your attitude during the interrogation and adjust their technique.

Isn’t the job about intelligence? Being intelligent enough to prepare and do research before a challenging situation and before facing a problem? Using any and all resources available.

The key to interview success lies in the planning. Interview preparation is essential. Failure to prepare is preparing to fail. The number one reason for an unsuccessful job interview is lack of preparation.

INTERVIEW PREPARATION RESOURCES

https://www.mi5.gov.uk/interview-preparation

http://blogs.salford.ac.uk/careers-empl ... h-for-mi5/


The first rule of applying to secret-squirrel government agencies that can't tell you what you're going to be doing is… don't tell anybody you're applying for a job where they can't tell you what you'll be doing.

First rule of CSIS is you don't talk about CSIS.

Second rule is...you don’t talk about…

Third rule…I could tell you... but then I'd have to…
;)
Member
Nov 9, 2008
477 posts
62 upvotes
Ottawa
What happens to all the info you provide....if you are not hired.
Destroyed? Kept somewhere?(huge risk knowing how cia and nsa was not safe from hackers)
Sr. Member
Nov 18, 2010
541 posts
222 upvotes
Vancouver
Those are standard questions for law enforcement.
Interviewers know those are very invasive questions.
They look for body language, eye contact etc...

They need to weed out bad candidates.

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