Automotive

has anyone used/bought Nankang SV1 winter tires?

  • Last Updated:
  • Oct 9th, 2010 3:47 am
[OP]
Deal Addict
Mar 4, 2006
1944 posts
63 upvotes
Toronto

has anyone used/bought Nankang SV1 winter tires?

I've read some reviews on these tires and they seem okay. In fact, excellent value for the $

For example:
Hankook w409 225/50/18- $870 all included
Blizzaks/Michelin etc. -$1000 +

Nankang SV1 225/50/18 - $678 included!!!

I was wondering if anyone had first hand experience with them? I'll be doing 80% highway kms
6 replies
Newbie
Oct 29, 2007
32 posts
Toronto
check the hot deals forum and search for simply tire. they had good deals...
Deal Addict
Oct 19, 2006
1863 posts
120 upvotes
If you can avoid 18 inch tires you'll be able to get good tires for about the same cost.

18 inch winter tires don't work too well for winter with the pot holes, potential for wheel meeting curb due to sliding etc etc. That's why most people go all out cheap and get the smallest sized wheel with steel rims. No one's going to cry if they have to replace a steel rim and the taller sidewall on the tire helps absorb pot hole shock. Softer tires (from the taller sidewall) also tends to stick better in the cold weather.
Deal Fanatic
User avatar
Jun 7, 2001
6530 posts
617 upvotes
Alberta
Personally, I would choose a bigger name brand than Nankang. If possible, I would also minus size to 17 or 16 inch (check brake caliper clearance though).

Dave
[OP]
Deal Addict
Mar 4, 2006
1944 posts
63 upvotes
Toronto
I'm debating between

1) buying 18" winter tires ONLY, keeping my stock alloys- $678 (nankang) $870 (hankook)
2) buying 17" winter tires steelies- $808 (nankang SV1) $880 (hankook w409)
3) buying 17" winter tires w/alloys- $1175 (hankook w409)

Of course i know with option 1, I would have to buy summer alloys next season but that will give me an good excuse to shop around!

17" is the smallest that will clear the caliper
gotak wrote:
Oct 8th, 2010 10:48 pm
If you can avoid 18 inch tires you'll be able to get good tires for about the same cost.

18 inch winter tires don't work too well for winter with the pot holes, potential for wheel meeting curb due to sliding etc etc. That's why most people go all out cheap and get the smallest sized wheel with steel rims. No one's going to cry if they have to replace a steel rim and the taller sidewall on the tire helps absorb pot hole shock. Softer tires (from the taller sidewall) also tends to stick better in the cold weather.
Deal Fanatic
User avatar
Jun 7, 2001
6530 posts
617 upvotes
Alberta
http://www.consumersearch.com/snow-tires/review This link doesn't have a favourable review on the Nankangs.

Assuming 225/50R18 (95 load rating) are your stock size, you can probably also go with 215/55R18 (94 load rating; 1.7% larger than stock) in either Toyo Observe G02plus or Bridgestone Blizzak WS70 (both are T-rated). Otherwise, I would stick with the Hankook I*pike W409 in a 225/50R18.

There are plenty of winter tire choices in the 215/60R17 size (96 load rating; 1.1% larger than stock) including General Altimax Arctic, Toyo Observe G02plus, Continental ExtremeWinterContact, Pirellli Winter Carving, Blizzak WS70, etc.
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