Automotive

Hate strangers parking on the road in front of your house?

  • Last Updated:
  • Mar 9th, 2010 9:22 pm
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Sr. Member
Mar 26, 2009
682 posts
23 upvotes
Vancouver
m4gician wrote:
Aug 6th, 2009 6:37 am
Uh... i'll put it this way... I own my lawn, because it's on my lot, you step on my lawn after I've worked tirelessly to pull the weeds, mow it, and get it looking great for the lawn awards then I swear........

LOL i can't even say it. I mean yes you can excuse it, unless there's damage to my lawn, I don't care, it's just rude to not respect someone's property lines that's all.
The LAW puts it this way: you do not own the first XX feet of your lawn, nor the street/curb infront of your house.

Law > you.

BTW the LAW defines your property lines, lookup where the liens are, and for that matter, what a lien is.

Feet don't hurt your lawn - wait they might knock over your precious manicured grass :lol: . Next step is you become one of those crazed idiots that shoots kids when their ball happens to land on your lawn. Get a life.
Sr. Member
Mar 26, 2009
682 posts
23 upvotes
Vancouver
Paranoidandroid wrote:
Aug 6th, 2009 8:10 am
However I don't understand why anyone would take it personally when people park in front of their house. Perhaps they are intimidated?
They are snobs with useless lives, no friends, and no hobbies. This is how they entertain themselves while watching their manicured lawn grow.
Deal Addict
May 25, 2009
1482 posts
152 upvotes
MTD71 wrote:
Aug 6th, 2009 2:20 pm
One neighbour has an older car that leaks oil. He wont park in his own driveway because of the oil leaking so he parks on the road. But, again because of the oil leak, he wont park in front of his own house and make a mess there, so he parks in front of his neighbours houses. The brand new roads of the new survey look like crap because of the big oil stains everywhere.
Are there any environmental protection laws or by-laws in any municipalities? Vehicles that are parked on the street (even in driveways) that leak oil are risks to the environment. The oil can leach into the soil and water table or the oil could wash into the storm water drains and into the drinking water. I would think there should be some sort of action that could be taken against vehicles like that.

On another note: do most municipalites issue residential parking permits for inner city/downtown core areas? I know in Calgary most of the inner city residential areas require a permit to park your vehicle. This attempts to keep vehicles from parking on the streets when visiting local businesses or commuting to work.
Deal Addict
May 25, 2009
1482 posts
152 upvotes
5dark wrote:
Aug 5th, 2009 10:12 pm
The increased traffic --> crime is an interesting theory but I can tell you in that area anything worth stealing is not in the parked cars.
It is true that typically there is not much to steal from an automobile especially when compared to expensive homes. What I'm trying to point out is that if a large number of vehicles began to park on the streets they would attract criminals looking to lift things out of the vehicles. If the criminals are attracted to the area they might escalate the crimes and go after individuals walking around or start breaking into houses or garages.

Criminals will usually go after the easy hits and slowly move towards more risky crimes. The vehicles are easy hits and become gateways into the neighbourhood for bigger crimes.
Deal Fanatic
User avatar
Mar 31, 2008
8009 posts
648 upvotes
Toronto
Ok, if its just for general, occaisional visits (ie. Neighbour's friends), the concensus it seems is sure, no problem.

But the person who parks there everyday to avoid paying for parking everyday, and expects to get away with it for the next years, decade or two (which let's face it, if you're not the one benefiting, though hypocritical, is weasily), people love to have them nailed.

-And its also.. 'oh no, not at our expense/in my backyard'.. expense = any disturbance attitude.

-People/animals are territorial, and the direct space in front does feel like it its their's, with also the Monopoly of the view from the house, taken by the Car also adds to that Territory Violation.

-Safety, or perceived safety. If one car starts parking there, its likely other cars will follow through (in essence the neighbourhood becoming a big parking lot for that company). Also attracting more 'criminals' and making it easier for them to 'hide out' and camouflage. People with little kids and babies do not like having constant and unecessary strangers around them due to the perceived danger of abuction, sexual assault, etc.

-The argument of 'downtown people understand parking on streets'. The counter to that is 'well, if you want to park on a residential street, go find parking downtown then'.

There's a reason why 'suburbia' does not have street permit parking. That's bc councilors at the 'request' of the constituents have made that either a non-issue, or made sure it did not get voted in. Hence, the profile, characteristic nature of 'suburbia' and their residences is 'no constant street parking' generally, especially from strangers otherwise we'll play within the laws, rules and Mandate voted by the citizens in the area and call parking enforcement vs downtown which has voted for parking rules that best suit its citizens (ie. street parking, but with strict time and permit limitations).
Sr. Member
User avatar
Oct 27, 2004
840 posts
15 upvotes
Interesting comments, all.

I think the reason people make the effort to call the bylaw officers is because of a real or perceived sleight. As at1212b says above, it's very much a "oh no, he di'int!" attitude which drives the behaviour.

I have been on both sides of this issue: I used to work midtown, and parking in the office lot was $17/day. Most of the neighbouring streets were signed "no parking before 10 am" or "no parking after 4 pm" so I didn't park there. I found a street a couple blocks away from the office where I could park with no time restrictions, and did so. I wasn't aware of the 3 hr. city bylaw (which I really think is a revenue grab, but whatever), and got a ticket after parking there for about a month. I found another street, and got into the habit of moving my car at 4:00. A minor inconvenience, but thankfully I don't work there anymore.

I paid the ticket, BTW.

I also live in a house with a laneway in the back. The laneway is a marked fire route: no parking. We had a neighbour who consistently parked in front of her driveway, rather than on it. The issue was, the laneway is tight, and by parking her car in the laneway, it was difficult for me to get into my driveway, particularly during the winter. After several calls to the bylaw office (which I assume resulted in at least one ticket for her), she no longer parks there.

Laws and Bylaws generally exist to enforce social civility. If you impinge on the rights and enjoyments of others, you should expect to pay the price.
Deal Expert
Oct 20, 2001
18709 posts
1160 upvotes
taylor192 wrote:
Aug 6th, 2009 3:58 pm
The LAW puts it this way: you do not own the first XX feet of your lawn, nor the street/curb infront of your house.

Law > you.
Many laws are enacted because people fail to use common sense. Probably at some point many years ago there was no 3 hour limit for street parking in most municipalities. But abuse of that privilege led to the bylaws with the time limits. In some places the rules have been tightened further (like what AudiDude mentioned about his neighborhood, and the "no parking before 10 am" signs Password mentioned) and in other places they have been loosened (Burlington has a limited extended parking program...they implemented a 3 hour limit about 20 years ago).

The point is that just because it is the current law, it doesn't mean that staying barely within the law is always in your best interest. Doing so may lead to consequences you may dislike.

BTW, that page from the Burlington website also says:
A 3-hour parking limit has been provided for the following reasons:

* To encourage residents to provide off-street parking for the number of vehicles they own;
* To reduce the number of vehicles parked on the road which can contribute to fail to remain collisions;
* To allow for road maintenance activities including road repairs, snow removal, sanding/salting, street cleaning, etc.;
* To facilitate the weekly collection of residential garbage;
* To control the problem of derelict vehicles;
* To improve traffic flow on residential streets; and,
* To encourage clear and uncluttered residential streets.
I'm sure some of you street parkers will have an issue with the last point, but it is one of the reasons even the city (not just the homeowners) wants to limit parking on the street.
These folks have taken over RFD, so I'm done here.

Mutu qabla an tamutu
Sr. Member
Mar 26, 2009
682 posts
23 upvotes
Vancouver
Rehan wrote:
Aug 6th, 2009 6:19 pm
I'm sure some of you street parkers will have an issue with the last point, but it is one of the reasons even the city (not just the homeowners) wants to limit parking on the street.
Understood, yet the argument from home owners isn't about "parking on the street", its about "parking on the street infront of my house"

Here in Vancouver even some homes don't have garages or lanes, so everyone parks in the street, making the streets crowded with cars. Yet still, home owners want to park infront of their house, and setup pylons to ensure it. This has nothing to do with the last point, this is just snobby behaviour.
Deal Fanatic
User avatar
Mar 31, 2008
8009 posts
648 upvotes
Toronto
taylor192 wrote:
Aug 6th, 2009 6:25 pm
Understood, yet the argument from home owners isn't about "parking on the street", its about "parking on the street infront of my house"

Here in Vancouver even some homes don't have garages or lanes, so everyone parks in the street, making the streets crowded with cars. Yet still, home owners want to park infront of their house, and setup pylons to ensure it. This has nothing to do with the last point, this is just snobby behaviour.
Newsflash: Humans are selfish! (and snobby)
Newbie
May 28, 2009
35 posts
Southern Ontario
My neighbor was ALWAYS taking the only spot in front so after about 3 months I just started parking my car there and left the driveway unused to piss him off.
Member
User avatar
Mar 14, 2005
453 posts
Edmonton, AB
I get annoyed when my neighbour 2 houses down parks in front of my house when he has a double garage that only has 1 car in it, and a driveway with only 1 car on it.

Not only that, but sometimes he sticks the rear of his car really close to the edge of my driveway, so I have to be careful when backing up.

Also, when we have a party or something, that's one less spot for our guests to park-in.

They do this almost every single day, so in my opinion they are jackasses. Especially when they have a perfectly good double-garage and double-driveway that they could park in.
Banned
User avatar
Jun 20, 2007
574 posts
Toronto
My neighbor has a 3 car garage and is able to at least park 8 on her driveway, YET SHE parks right in front of my lawn so she can drop her kids off to where they want to go on the fly.

I turn a blind eye because its mutual respect that we are neighbors, and we both will need favors in the long run,.
Deal Addict
User avatar
Feb 17, 2005
3509 posts
285 upvotes
I do find it annoying when they impede snow removal vehicles. Aside from that, it's matter of what each person considers as reasonable.

When I went to school, I use to pay for parking on campus when I was full time but when I was part time it didn't make sense. So I parked the closest residential, tried to park on spots away from driveways. Over time they pushed the no parking from 9am to 6pm further out from the campus.

I find this no different than those annoying speed humps in residential areas, I have them in mine and I don't want them.
Deal Addict
User avatar
Jan 11, 2009
3147 posts
260 upvotes
Toronto
i only dislike when they park on the opposite side but directly infront of the driveway...

if they park across from me but along the curb that is not infront of my driveway then i'm fine with it...
Sr. Member
User avatar
Jan 13, 2007
827 posts
6 upvotes
VorteC wrote:
Aug 5th, 2009 9:59 pm
I want to be able to look out my house and enjoy the view, not see a bunch of cars parked in front of my house.

99% of the time people park in front of my house because they don't want to park in front of their own houses or something ******** like that. I don't mind when my neighbors has a house party and need the extra space but there are some people who keep parking in front of our house.

When I back out of my driveway I would like to see the road so I can safely back out, but I can't do that when theres some parked car in front of my house obstructing my view.
+1

things like this (should) go without saying. its about consideration.

theres a reason lots that front on to parks are worth thousands more than those that dont. obviously if there is value to having a nice view, people appreciate it. and when the view is blocked, it annoys them. its as simple as that.

just like
  • you dont park on your lawn
  • you dont pile garbage up at the side of your house, especially if you put it at the opposite side of your entrance so you dont see it, and your neighbors door is right there and they see it.
  • you do your best to keep your weeds under control, as they easily spread to your neighbors grass if you dont (happening to me right now in my back yard)
  • you dont blast your radio whenever youre washing your car

im sure there are a ton more.


if anyone shares these thoughts, lets make a list of usernames. then we can all go buy up all the houses on a street somewhere :D
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