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Heater recommendation for basement ?

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  • Dec 11th, 2018 8:23 pm
[OP]
Deal Addict
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Dec 6, 2008
1967 posts
325 upvotes
Milton, Ontario

Heater recommendation for basement ?

Trying to get some kind of heater for basement as the temp is anywhere between 18-19c while top floors are 22-23c.
I have 600sqft basement so would probably need two heaters at both ends.
Upstairs in kids bedrooms we have https://www.amazon.ca/Mill-AB-H1500DN-1 ... B01G5HFVA0 to keep steady temps overnight.

In case anyone asks, basement is finished, rigid foam on concrete walls, and r-14 bat insulation, floors are on Dricore Subfloor R+ and laminate.
3 vents and 1 return, but the airflow is really low even with some vents closed on 1st and second floor.
12 replies
Deal Addict
Feb 11, 2018
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toyopl wrote:
Dec 8th, 2018 7:14 am
Trying to get some kind of heater for basement as the temp is anywhere between 18-19c while top floors are 22-23c.
I have 600sqft basement so would probably need two heaters at both ends.
Upstairs in kids bedrooms we have https://www.amazon.ca/Mill-AB-H1500DN-1 ... B01G5HFVA0 to keep steady temps overnight.

In case anyone asks, basement is finished, rigid foam on concrete walls, and r-14 bat insulation, floors are on Dricore Subfloor R+ and laminate.
3 vents and 1 return, but the airflow is really low even with some vents closed on 1st and second floor.
Get this from HD. I have one in a bedroom and it does make a difference. I would suggest buying three and you can always return all, some or none to HD depending on the result you get.
Always try to think outside the box!
Deal Addict
Aug 29, 2011
3452 posts
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Mississauga
Weird, my finished basement was constructed very similarly but the temp is no different than any other floor. Maybe the only difference is I have good airflow, to the point that I have to damper some of the registers because it gets too warm. I also run my furnace fan 24/7.
Deal Addict
Feb 11, 2018
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Yes definitely the furnace fan must be run 24h/day in order to get a more harmonized temp throughout the house.
Always try to think outside the box!
Deal Addict
Nov 17, 2012
1365 posts
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Toronto
A $60 oil filled radiator heater will do the same as any of those $200 units.

Especially in a basement which I assume is used sporadically. Turn it on when you want and turn it off when you don’t. You don’t need thermostats etc.
[OP]
Deal Addict
User avatar
Dec 6, 2008
1967 posts
325 upvotes
Milton, Ontario
Thanks, run fan on 24/7 yesterday, temps were 1-2c higher.
Deal Addict
Aug 18, 2009
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Toronto
TomLafinsky wrote:
Dec 8th, 2018 8:29 am
Get this from HD. I have one in a bedroom and it does make a difference. I would suggest buying three and you can always return all, some or none to HD depending on the result you get.
Interesting. i didnt know these existed.

I have a cold basement as well and noticed that the airflow is quite strong but I do not think there are enough vent registers for the size of room (walkout with high ceilings).
Instead of installing a booster, would it make sense to add another register somewhere along the existing duct work?
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Feb 11, 2018
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VertigoM wrote:
Dec 11th, 2018 1:07 pm
Interesting. i didnt know these existed.

I have a cold basement as well and noticed that the airflow is quite strong but I do not think there are enough vent registers for the size of room (walkout with high ceilings).
Instead of installing a booster, would it make sense to add another register somewhere along the existing duct work?
Yes if you can tap into the large rectangular duct coming out of your furnace. I don't know if the heat is delivered from the ceiling of your basement or close to the floor, but it would be much better if the heat could come from close to the floor. But this might involve building a small box around the 4" duct with 2X4 and then drywall + mud +painting.

One way or the other 2 sources of heat is better than one. Also make sure the cold air return is proportionate and far from your source of heat.
Always try to think outside the box!
Deal Addict
Aug 18, 2009
1046 posts
391 upvotes
Toronto
Unfortunately there are only 2 registers in that room. One on the ceiling (ugh) and another that is low close to the floor. Both registers are at the far end of the room (furthest from the furnace). I was thinking of opening a third register somewhere along the duct work that feeds into the other 2. But perhaps all that will do is reduce the airflow to the other 2.

I do have a gas fireplace in the room, I suppose it would cost less to run that than install an electric heater?
Deal Addict
Feb 11, 2018
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VertigoM wrote:
Dec 11th, 2018 1:27 pm
Unfortunately there are only 2 registers in that room. One on the ceiling (ugh) and another that is low close to the floor. Both registers are at the far end of the room (furthest from the furnace). I was thinking of opening a third register somewhere along the duct work that feeds into the other 2. But perhaps all that will do is reduce the airflow to the other 2.

I do have a gas fireplace in the room, I suppose it would cost less to run that than install an electric heater?
Yes, it would only reduce the flow from the ones you currently have. How is your cold air return? How many, what size of ducts?

You will really benefit from using the fireplace IF it is equipped with a fan. If you don't already have a fan then look at the bottom of the fireplace to see if the builder left an electrical outlet. If there is one than you could possibly buy the part and add it yourself. A fireplace without this blower fan is sending more than 50% of the heat to the outside.

Alternatively you could use an air mover and locate it in front at the bottom of the fireplace to push air so that heat would be flowing from the top of your fireplace. But it might be too noisy.
Always try to think outside the box!
Jr. Member
Apr 19, 2018
134 posts
129 upvotes
VertigoM wrote:
Dec 11th, 2018 1:27 pm
Unfortunately there are only 2 registers in that room. One on the ceiling (ugh) and another that is low close to the floor. Both registers are at the far end of the room (furthest from the furnace). I was thinking of opening a third register somewhere along the duct work that feeds into the other 2. But perhaps all that will do is reduce the airflow to the other 2.

I do have a gas fireplace in the room, I suppose it would cost less to run that than install an electric heater?
The gas fireplace is definitely cheaper and no time of use rates to worry about. My daughter's fireplace is hooked up to a thermostat (instead of a switch) that turns the fireplace on and off as needed. She turns the thermostat way down when the basement room isn't occupied. It is amazing how quickly the room heats up with the gas fireplace running.
Jr. Member
Apr 19, 2018
134 posts
129 upvotes
toyopl wrote:
Dec 8th, 2018 7:14 am
Trying to get some kind of heater for basement as the temp is anywhere between 18-19c while top floors are 22-23c.
I have 600sqft basement so would probably need two heaters at both ends.
Upstairs in kids bedrooms we have https://www.amazon.ca/Mill-AB-H1500DN-1 ... B01G5HFVA0 to keep steady temps overnight.

In case anyone asks, basement is finished, rigid foam on concrete walls, and r-14 bat insulation, floors are on Dricore Subfloor R+ and laminate.
3 vents and 1 return, but the airflow is really low even with some vents closed on 1st and second floor.
Make sure the ducts to the basement room are clear and the damper at the head of the duct is fully open. The damper lever may be hard to spot if the ductwork is full of twists and turns. Peoples will often close these to keep heat out of an unused room or cold air from coming in during summer.

I always rebalanced my duct dampers when switching from heating to cooling and vice versa.

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