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  • Nov 15th, 2017 7:56 pm
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[OP]
Jr. Member
Jan 3, 2017
178 posts
137 upvotes

Help Me buy a New TV

Haven't bought a new TV inabout 7 years. Recently did some reno's and we need 2 of them. Budget is about $1k each. I'm thinking 4k is the way to go these days? Confused about all the options out there, HD, Ultra High HD, 4k, LED, curved, smart TV etc.

From what I understand if I buy a 4k TV, there isn't much of difference between that or non 4k currently except it's more future proofed with the exception of sports? We don't watch sports ever so that's a non issue

TV's would be used only with an Android box and PS4/Nintendo Switch system. We haven't had cable in years if that matters. We also don't watch dvd's or blue rays etc. If we watch a movie it's on the android box.

I would prefer a larger screen and to me an extra few inches is more important than a slight increase in picture quality unless the difference is quite obvious.
Whats the most important feature? Refresh rate?
Thanks!
14 replies
Deal Expert
Aug 2, 2004
25391 posts
2750 upvotes
East Gwillimbury
I think you’re stuck with 50” on a $1,000 budget.

I would skip the 4K. Streamed content is rarely 4K because of the bandwidth requirement.
Deal Addict
Jan 18, 2009
1857 posts
679 upvotes
  • Last year's BF, the Vizio P50 was 1K at Costco.
  • 4K is not important because contents are rare however, HDR is only available at 4K (maybe you can get HDR at 1080p on YouTube). IMO, HDR looks way better than SDR.
  • Paying more for curve is stupid, there's no improved IQ, just harder to find matching accessories (soundbar, stand, etc.)
  • OLED > FALD >>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>> LED (QLED, YLED, wtfLED ....). Edge-lit TVs sux for watching Movies, fine for watching cartoons and pr0n.
  • UHD certified is basically a Samsung self-pinned badge. Many of Samsung UHD certified TVs can't display black.
  • In your decision making, don't consider the Smart in SmartTV , the only exception is AndroidTV.
"A Eruchîn, ú-dano i faelas a hyn an uben tanatha le faelas!" -- Aragorn
Hath no loyalty to any ISP, for you shall receive none!
Deal Expert
User avatar
May 22, 2005
18460 posts
3601 upvotes
Thornhill
Rtings is a good place to start reading on the TV models, as well as categories of strengths and weaknesses. These can vary depending on many things, person viewing it, room size, room brightness, media content consumed, etc.


http://www.rtings.com/tv/reviews/best/b ... under-1000

Do note they usually only review common models from Sony, LG, Samsung, Vizio, and not so much the bargain bin brands (RCA, Haier, Westinghouse, Hisense/Sharp, Toshiba, etc.).

Still, its a good way to read and understand what things to look for that are important to you. For example, personally I had a Samsung KS8000 (2016 model) that I broke so I am looking to replace it. The 2017 Model, MU8000, is actually a sidegrade but for the same price. I prioritized 4K, sports, HDR content/games and TV shows (upscaling). During my search, I only considered Sony and Samsung TVs for this reason. If I had read and learned more from Rtings, I would of realized that the TV is located in a dark room with evening only usage, the Sony or Vizio would of been a better option. I only found out after I bought the TV.



Personally, this is my thoughts on a common TV purchase, also depends on size. Do note that there is no 'best brand', every manufacturer has its tiers and some TVs can be total crap.

Tier 1, usually under $1000 low end TVs:

Price is everything, quality and reliability can be a crap shoot. RCA/Haier often have 55" 4K TVs on sale around $400-$600. This is an area where TVs close to the $1000 mark tend to be marketed to be more upscale, but in reality, just slightly better, but not significant enough to jump to the next tier. Often 'fake' HDR and 'fake' 4K is advertised, though to a lot of people, they don't have the right content to tell the difference anyways.

Tier 2, $1500~$2500 middle end TVs

This is the sweet spot. You get TVs with fantastic features, like high contrast from FALD, or high brightness, wide colour gamut. Everything that's needed for a HDR experience. But many times these TVs are missing certain things to fall to this price tier from the top tier.

Popular models, for this years 2017 crop are the Sony X900e and Vizio P series. The Samsung 2017 models appear to be a sidegrade right now but are still decent.

$????+++

OLED rules here, even with its weaknesses. It's strengths are next level but research needs to be done if this is right for you.
Newbie
Mar 8, 2008
28 posts
7 upvotes
Newmarket, Ontario
Go to Costco and get the e55-e1 for $849, don't over think this, unless you have a bunch of tv's side by side you won't see the difference... Pretty much all of the current tv's from the major manufacturers look very good showing HD or 4k content. My brother purchased the 55" rca from the superstore for $429 and it looks really good showing HD and 4k, seriously.
Deal Addict
Jan 18, 2009
1857 posts
679 upvotes
whatsitcalled wrote:
Nov 12th, 2017 9:01 am
Go to Costco and get the e55-e1 for $849, don't over think this, unless you have a bunch of tv's side by side you won't see the difference... Pretty much all of the current tv's from the major manufacturers look very good showing HD or 4k content. My brother purchased the 55" rca from the superstore for $429 and it looks really good showing HD and 4k, seriously.
it's in the eye of the beholder. My bro-in-law got the Sharp LC-75N8000U from Costco. HD Cable and Netflix HD look terrible on it. 4K looks ok (netflix's Marco Polo) but I can barely see the difference between HDR and SDR. Put a good HDR movie on an OLED and you will be mesmerized.
"A Eruchîn, ú-dano i faelas a hyn an uben tanatha le faelas!" -- Aragorn
Hath no loyalty to any ISP, for you shall receive none!
Newbie
Nov 8, 2017
9 posts
1 upvote
bogolisk wrote:
Nov 12th, 2017 9:28 am
it's in the eye of the beholder. My bro-in-law got the Sharp LC-75N8000U from Costco. HD Cable and Netflix HD look terrible on it. 4K looks ok (netflix's Marco Polo) but I can barely see the difference between HDR and SDR. Put a good HDR movie on an OLED and you will be mesmerized.
That Sharp isn't a full HDR TV, only legit review I could find says it has mediocre brightness and bad contrast. See: https://www.soundandvision.com/content/ ... dtv-review

By far the best set under $1000 is the Vizio M55 e1 at Costco for $999 or cheaper in store. https://m.costco.ca/Vizio-M55-E0-55-in. ... 66344.html

CNET finally reviewed it, and had very nice things to say about it, https://www.cnet.com/products/vizio-m55-e0/review/
I would trust their reviews a bit more than rtings or others.

Happy shopping, it's almost black Friday...
Deal Addict
Oct 27, 2007
1305 posts
26 upvotes
Gee wrote:
Nov 12th, 2017 5:50 am
I think you’re stuck with 50” on a $1,000 budget.

I would skip the 4K. Streamed content is rarely 4K because of the bandwidth requirement.
I've seen 1080p TVs at Best Buy and online (I forget the outlet) for cheap, under $300. Are they worth it? I think one was a Chinese Haier or Hisense and the one at Best Buy was Insignia. Are those brands 'fair?' I guess what I am trying to ask is, can one trust the panel in them? They might not be the best but what I (and anyone?) want to avoid is crappy quality sets. I'm not asking for the best but a cheap price and fair quality (no defects, decent picture....i.e. not awful).

Sorry to the OP if he wants an expensive set but I agreed with your reply (premise) since I think 4K sets aren't really worth it at this point in time. I was interested in them and still am but I don't think there's enough programming or use for them yet - although, maybe gamers want the higher resolution?
Deal Addict
Jan 18, 2009
1857 posts
679 upvotes
whatsitcalled wrote:
Nov 12th, 2017 9:01 am
Pretty much all of the current tv's from the major manufacturers look very good showing HD or 4k content.
bogolisk wrote:
Nov 12th, 2017 9:28 am
it's in the eye of the beholder. My bro-in-law got the Sharp LC-75N8000U from Costco. HD Cable and Netflix HD look terrible on it.
Dealpilot wrote:
Nov 12th, 2017 11:25 am
That Sharp isn't a full HDR TV, only legit review I could find says it has mediocre brightness and bad contrast.
I was telling the OP: unlike what @whatsitcalled wrote, not all TVs look very good showing HD or 4k
"A Eruchîn, ú-dano i faelas a hyn an uben tanatha le faelas!" -- Aragorn
Hath no loyalty to any ISP, for you shall receive none!
Deal Expert
Aug 2, 2004
25391 posts
2750 upvotes
East Gwillimbury
teleguitar wrote:
Nov 12th, 2017 12:38 pm
I've seen 1080p TVs at Best Buy and online (I forget the outlet) for cheap, under $300. Are they worth it? I think one was a Chinese Haier or Hisense and the one at Best Buy was Insignia. Are those brands 'fair?' I guess what I am trying to ask is, can one trust the panel in them? They might not be the best but what I (and anyone?) want to avoid is crappy quality sets. I'm not asking for the best but a cheap price and fair quality (no defects, decent picture....i.e. not awful).
Typically, you get what you pay for.

The supply of panels are controlled by a few companies. Most of these no name brands are B grade panels that didn't pass quality control from their tier 1 parent.

I think for most people, the picture quality will pass.

Here is my philosophy, assuming you get 5 years use out of every TV. You can spend $300 today on a bargain set and enjoy it for 5 years, or you can spend $1,000. Either way, you need to replace it in 5 years. The question is, will you get a substantially better experience watching a $1,000 vs the $300 TV?

Even if the $1,000 TV lasts 10 years, you can replace your $300 TV in 5 years and still come out ahead financially. Keep in mind, 5 years from now, the new TV will be better than a tier 1 TV purchased today. It will have a lot more new features.
Deal Addict
Jan 18, 2009
1857 posts
679 upvotes
Gee wrote:
Nov 12th, 2017 1:25 pm
Typically, you get what you pay for.
Even if the $1,000 TV lasts 10 years, you can replace your $300 TV in 5 years and still come out ahead financially. Keep in mind, 5 years from now, the new TV will be better than a tier 1 TV purchased today. It will have a lot more new features.
Today's OLED is definitely better than Plasma 5 year ago. The best FALD TVs today are arguably better than Plasma 5 years ago. The $300 TVs today are terrible compared to the Plasma 5 years ago. Today's $300 TVs sux, period.
"A Eruchîn, ú-dano i faelas a hyn an uben tanatha le faelas!" -- Aragorn
Hath no loyalty to any ISP, for you shall receive none!
Deal Expert
Aug 2, 2004
25391 posts
2750 upvotes
East Gwillimbury
bogolisk wrote:
Nov 12th, 2017 4:02 pm
Today's OLED is definitely better than Plasma 5 year ago. The best FALD TVs today are arguably better than Plasma 5 years ago. The $300 TVs today are terrible compared to the Plasma 5 years ago. Today's $300 TVs sux, period.
Today's OLED cost over $3,500, if I can get 10 years use from a good OLED, it could cost me roughly $1 per day.

For $3,500, I can buy almost 12 cheap TVs (Not that I would, I fall in the mid range group). That is a new TV every year and still have extra money after 10 years.

Like I said, you get what you pay for.
Deal Addict
Oct 27, 2007
1305 posts
26 upvotes
Gee wrote:
Nov 12th, 2017 1:25 pm
Typically, you get what you pay for.

The supply of panels are controlled by a few companies. Most of these no name brands are B grade panels that didn't pass quality control from their tier 1 parent.

I think for most people, the picture quality will pass.

Here is my philosophy, assuming you get 5 years use out of every TV. You can spend $300 today on a bargain set and enjoy it for 5 years, or you can spend $1,000. Either way, you need to replace it in 5 years. The question is, will you get a substantially better experience watching a $1,000 vs the $300 TV?

Even if the $1,000 TV lasts 10 years, you can replace your $300 TV in 5 years and still come out ahead financially. Keep in mind, 5 years from now, the new TV will be better than a tier 1 TV purchased today. It will have a lot more new features.
I agree with you, 100%. But, are we saying that the brand doesn't matter with this price? Or can we find a 'diamond in the rough' among them? Will one of the sets have a 'decent' (i.e. not great - but one can live with the picture quality - that is, without being able to compare to $1000 sets, the picture is satisfactory?) picture or are they all just 'B grade?'
Deal Expert
Aug 2, 2004
25391 posts
2750 upvotes
East Gwillimbury
teleguitar wrote:
Nov 14th, 2017 3:30 pm
I agree with you, 100%. But, are we saying that the brand doesn't matter with this price? Or can we find a 'diamond in the rough' among them? Will one of the sets have a 'decent' (i.e. not great - but one can live with the picture quality - that is, without being able to compare to $1000 sets, the picture is satisfactory?) picture or are they all just 'B grade?'
I don’t think the average person will know the difference in panel quality unless you’re looking for it.

The main difference between the cheaper televisions will be he software and the fit and finish.

For a B grade, I would look at Haier. Then tend to use Au panels which is acceptable. Toshiba uses LG B grade panels. Insignia also uses Au panels

There are definitely diamonds in the rough. Vizio started as a B grade manufacturer but offers great features and was brought into the lime light. I still consider them a B grade manufacturer but a lot of people think they are just as good as the tier 1 manufacturers
[OP]
Jr. Member
Jan 3, 2017
178 posts
137 upvotes
Thanks for the help everyone. I lost internet for a few days so wasn't able to get back to this thread until now. I've checked Costco and they don't have the models suggested in this thread anymore. I'll keep looking as I have to make a decision in the next day or two. My wife and I were looking at a few TV's in the 1200+ tax range and decided we don't mind spending a bit more for a tv that we will be happy with.

On a side note, we bought a real Cheap 50" LED from Walmart for $478 for the basement so my kids can hook up their video game systems and are having an issue with blurriness at times while watching normal television. While the upstairs was being renovated we were watching "The Brave" & "SWAT" on it which are just normal tv shows running from a rogers PVR via an HDMI cable and we noticed blurriness anytime there was a lot of action or at random times when there seemed to be a lot happening on the tv at once. I've never had this issue on any tv that I own in the past however I have never spent that little on a TV before.

We don't want this happening for obvious reasons for the new TV that we are putting in upstairs after the reno's and I was wondering what would cause this? It can't be the tv itself can it? Even the cheapest tv's should be able to handle a normal television broadcast? I have tried different picture modes such as movie and gaming but it's all the same result.

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