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HELP! What should I do with my career?

  • Last Updated:
  • Apr 24th, 2017 10:43 am
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Jr. Member
Apr 14, 2017
192 posts
61 upvotes
DT Calgary
Finish your degree. Very few people will ever make 250k, even 100k is unlikely for the average Canadian.
[OP]
Newbie
Apr 15, 2017
14 posts
1 upvote
No Frills wrote:
Apr 17th, 2017 5:10 pm
What did your uncle say when you told him your interest?
He said go for it. He said he would try to get me interviews. I had one for desjardins and aviva but didn't land the positions. I'm thinking I should invest in myself and start taking CIP courses
Deal Fanatic
Feb 9, 2006
7460 posts
1574 upvotes
Brampton
johnsmith01 wrote:
Apr 17th, 2017 2:34 pm
Yeah my uncle is pulling in 250k+ but he has 20 yrs of experience. He has been making 6 figures for a while now, and it's driving me crazy how he is making a mockery out of university education. That's why I want to get into insurance so bad, literally like right now, so I can start racking up those years of experience.
Now now. He can't claim the credit for that. Universities have been doing that all on their own.
Jr. Member
Apr 13, 2010
109 posts
25 upvotes
If its 250k after 20 years in the insurance business, my guess is that Uncle Insurance done quite well in terms of navigating the career and getting promoted in to a senior manager.

Go ahead and quit your degree, but you would be really naïve to believe that your uncle's story means that after putting X number of years it automatically means you to get Y money. He lived and worked in a different generation. Those rules don't necessarily apply anymore.

If you believe in that formula, go after the public sector jobs like government. Otherwise stories like your uncle are not easy money; takes a bit of luck and political maneuvering in this current day and age. You can still transition fairly easily in to insurance and any industry after your accounting degree; can you do the same once you devote a college degree to become an underwriter?


That and a side note - insurance is going through MAJOR changes right now. I won't say much beyond that, but learn the words Robotic Process Automation. You'll know it fairly soon.
Deal Addict
User avatar
Sep 16, 2012
3012 posts
289 upvotes
Mississauga
Finish your degree, get co-op experience, use your Uncle's connections to begin your career path if you are truly passionate about the industry.
[OP]
Newbie
Apr 15, 2017
14 posts
1 upvote
ATrac wrote:
Apr 18th, 2017 9:12 am
If its 250k after 20 years in the insurance business, my guess is that Uncle Insurance done quite well in terms of navigating the career and getting promoted in to a senior manager.

Go ahead and quit your degree, but you would be really naïve to believe that your uncle's story means that after putting X number of years it automatically means you to get Y money. He lived and worked in a different generation. Those rules don't necessarily apply anymore.

If you believe in that formula, go after the public sector jobs like government. Otherwise stories like your uncle are not easy money; takes a bit of luck and political maneuvering in this current day and age. You can still transition fairly easily in to insurance and any industry after your accounting degree; can you do the same once you devote a college degree to become an underwriter?


That and a side note - insurance is going through MAJOR changes right now. I won't say much beyond that, but learn the words Robotic Process Automation. You'll know it fairly soon.
can't you say that for everything though? technology is evolving...blah blah blah
Deal Addict
User avatar
Dec 27, 2009
3289 posts
1250 upvotes
Ottawa, ON
johnsmith01 wrote:
Apr 18th, 2017 3:40 pm
can't you say that for everything though? technology is evolving...blah blah blah
Some jobs are a lot easier to replace than others.
Jr. Member
Apr 13, 2010
109 posts
25 upvotes
johnsmith01 wrote:
Apr 18th, 2017 3:40 pm
can't you say that for everything though? technology is evolving...blah blah blah
Are you going to evolve with it or against it? Ask the people who work in Cyber Security, UX Development, Medical Science, Tech and Strategy Implementation, etc etc. See how they feel on the other side of technology.



You know what. You're right. Disregard it. Its all blah blah blah.
Go do what your uncle tells you do in life.
[OP]
Newbie
Apr 15, 2017
14 posts
1 upvote
ATrac wrote:
Apr 18th, 2017 4:14 pm
Are you going to evolve with it or against it? Ask the people who work in Cyber Security, UX Development, Medical Science, Tech and Strategy Implementation, etc etc. See how they feel on the other side of technology.



You know what. You're right. Disregard it. Its all blah blah blah.
Go do what your uncle tells you do in life.
I'm really not trying to be disrespectful. I actually think that technology isn't evolving as fast as people say it is. These changes take a long time to implement. Just my opinion though. Insurance companies are using old software and methods to complete work. They need to catch up to the present era first before they make drastic changes
Member
Mar 17, 2016
358 posts
232 upvotes
I'd say go for it. Forget about the degree. The whole point of a degree is to get your foot in the door and if you already have an uncle who is very successful and well-connected (you mentioned he already arranged for a few interviews for you) then you're all set. You can always finish up your degree later on if you encounter a road block.

University degrees have become insanely overrated lately. If you already landed a decent job, then you're better than 80% of the graduates. I finished my degree on time and then couldn't find anything decent for 2 years. I make good money now but honestly I feel like I could have got here with just a college diploma, maybe even just a highschool diploma. It's the connections, social skills and work ethic that gets you moving on the career ladder. I wish I had a successful uncle like that when I was desperately looking around for jobs after graduating.
[OP]
Newbie
Apr 15, 2017
14 posts
1 upvote
Hindenburg1 wrote:
Apr 19th, 2017 11:11 pm
I'd say go for it. Forget about the degree. The whole point of a degree is to get your foot in the door and if you already have an uncle who is very successful and well-connected (you mentioned he already arranged for a few interviews for you) then you're all set. You can always finish up your degree later on if you encounter a road block.

University degrees have become insanely overrated lately. If you already landed a decent job, then you're better than 80% of the graduates. I finished my degree on time and then couldn't find anything decent for 2 years. I make good money now but honestly I feel like I could have got here with just a college diploma, maybe even just a highschool diploma. It's the connections, social skills and work ethic that gets you moving on the career ladder. I wish I had a successful uncle like that when I was desperately looking around for jobs after graduating.
I feel like me having that title of "currently pursuing CIP" will allow me to get more interviews. I really did want to land at least 1 of the 2 interviews, but I did not. I am returning to school starting may 1st and have 8months of coop sept-apr. I'll try to find an insurance placement if anything to get my foot in the door
Deal Fanatic
User avatar
Nov 6, 2010
7904 posts
768 upvotes
Does your uncle like what he does? Do you like what he does or is money your only motivation? Sure money is good, but to get there you have to be good at what you do, very good in fact. I'm a believer that your performance is to an extent tied to how much you like what you do; if you're not happy with what you're doing, you're less likely to want to push yourself to be better at it and excel in the field among your peers.

This is especially apparent in customer facing roles where clients can usually sense if you're unhappy with what you're doing and it will translate into the experience you give them and their repeated business.

Anyways, my point is assess the situation beyond just the money. Assess your ability to perform in that field and your outlooks. Don't get so wrapped up in this dream of "ballin" (I use the term because that's kind of the image many of these socialite rich young people give out on the media).
[OP]
Newbie
Apr 15, 2017
14 posts
1 upvote
uber_shnitz wrote:
Apr 20th, 2017 10:05 am
Does your uncle like what he does? Do you like what he does or is money your only motivation? Sure money is good, but to get there you have to be good at what you do, very good in fact. I'm a believer that your performance is to an extent tied to how much you like what you do; if you're not happy with what you're doing, you're less likely to want to push yourself to be better at it and excel in the field among your peers.

This is especially apparent in customer facing roles where clients can usually sense if you're unhappy with what you're doing and it will translate into the experience you give them and their repeated business.

Anyways, my point is assess the situation beyond just the money. Assess your ability to perform in that field and your outlooks. Don't get so wrapped up in this dream of "ballin" (I use the term because that's kind of the image many of these socialite rich young people give out on the media).
I found my purpose. I have been in sales roles since highschool and I love it. I love interacting with people. Accounting does not really deal with people and going to them. This is so much more than the money.
Deal Fanatic
User avatar
Nov 6, 2010
7904 posts
768 upvotes
johnsmith01 wrote:
Apr 20th, 2017 10:34 am
I found my purpose. I have been in sales roles since highschool and I love it. I love interacting with people. Accounting does not really deal with people and going to them. This is so much more than the money.
What made you go into accounting in the first place if you don't mind me asking? Seems you're not very fond of it.
[OP]
Newbie
Apr 15, 2017
14 posts
1 upvote
uber_shnitz wrote:
Apr 20th, 2017 10:35 am
What made you go into accounting in the first place if you don't mind me asking? Seems you're not very fond of it.
loved it in high school. did limited research about it, was looking at figures and they didnt seem too bad. When I got to university I learned more about the CPA process and what it takes to get to 6 figures (very long...even with credentials). Accounting is rigorous. I learned something this year, there is a work to earning ratio. The end goal should be to do the least amount of work possible and get the highest pay possible and accounting is the exact opposite of that. The way independent accident benefit adjusters work is that they bill their hours to clients. That is where I want to be.

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