Home & Garden

Home owner denying access to outdoor power plug for the block heater

  • Last Updated:
  • Jan 22nd, 2019 8:07 am
[OP]
Newbie
Jan 17, 2019
1 posts

Home owner denying access to outdoor power plug for the block heater

I am in a very confusing situation. Here is my situation -
I am a resident of Ontario. I have rented a house, and I pay my rent individually. My rent lease covers all utilities and parking space for one car. I am only one owning a car in the house of all. Unlike the last owner with whom I had a similar arrangement, this owner is not allowing me to use outdoor power plug for my car's block heater. I live in Northern Ontario, and my car is ancient and relies on the block hear for a smooth start in the morning. He has unpowered the plug and is asking me $50 for a month for access with reason that it was not part of the lease. Being a student and already a high rent, $50 for three months would be a hefty expense. Is it right of him to ask this money? My lease already says that hydro covered by owner and there is a facility to park one vehicle. Can he land me in trouble for using power extension from the house and not paying him extra for outdoor power plug?
36 replies
Deal Addict
Jan 13, 2004
1299 posts
206 upvotes
Mississauga
If u leave it plugged in all night then it will probably cost about $60 a month. I think its fair to ask for $50 a month.
Deal Fanatic
User avatar
Mar 23, 2008
9751 posts
6140 upvotes
Edmonton
You mention "last owner"... Did the property change hands, or was that a different property? If this is the same property, you might have grounds to file a claim with the LTB based on the landlord reduced the services provided. You can contact the LTB to find out if you have a case. The form to fill out is the T3 form, located here:
http://www.sjto.gov.on.ca/ltb/forms/

Plan B (especially if heat is included in your rent) is to crack open a window and run an extension cord from your bedroom out to the car...

C
Deal Fanatic
Feb 15, 2006
8283 posts
2567 upvotes
Toronto
The owner is rightfully worried it'll use up a lot of electricity.

If you use a timer to turn it on 1/2 hr before you go out in the morning, that'll use much less electricity. Talk to the owner and see what you can negotiate.
Deal Guru
User avatar
Feb 11, 2007
11783 posts
11439 upvotes
Oakville
There's no limitation in your rental agreement so the owner has no right to deny your use of electricity. If you want to run 500W computer 24/7 inside what is he gonna do?
No different than running a 500W block heater.

However, rather than run an extension and plug your block heater in (as your are within your rights to do), maybe you can avoid getting into a fight by using a timer to control your block heater so that it only runs for an hour or 2 before you leave.

I run a timer for my car's block heater. Running it all night is pretty dumb. Here are some options.
https://www.canadiantire.ca/en/pdp/noma ... 8845p.html
https://www.amazon.ca/STANLEY31214-Outd ... B008HTAGUK
https://www.amazon.ca/Intermatic-HB31K- ... B00P4S5VIE
Deal Addict
User avatar
Sep 27, 2011
3424 posts
2181 upvotes
Toronto
Use a block heater timer. They're like $15 at Home Depot. You only need it turning on 2 hours beforehand. No reason to run it all night.
FreezingCanada wrote:
Jan 3rd, 2015 5:41 pm
We voted him in as God of RFD last month. Where were you during elections...?
Deal Addict
User avatar
Oct 14, 2010
1167 posts
621 upvotes
Barrie ON
It is not unusual for high rise apartment managers to demand an extra fee from anyone operating an air conditioner in the summer months. In my city, they charge a onetime annual fee of $50. They can also specify what type of AC units you can install. These are primarily the floor models with a hose that goes to the window. Nothing is allows to hang over the windows sill. In an apartment an additional $50 could come close to doubling the cost that a tenant would normally use.

Some folks have already given references to the cost of a block heater, but if you had a KiiiaWatt ($30.99 at Amazon) you could measure the actual KWH used and calculate the cost. Then you could make a mutually agreeable deal with the landlord.
Deal Expert
Aug 22, 2011
28850 posts
14659 upvotes
Ottawa
+1 using a timer.
Even if it was free, there's no need to waste that much electricity having it plugged all night.
Member
Jan 7, 2006
386 posts
144 upvotes
Toronto
My block heater works out to about 3 cents an hour off peak. I have it on a timer, I run it for 3 hours before my usual driving time.. I don't really need to plug in, but it gets me heat about 2km earlier on a -10 day.

I checked with a killawatt meter.
Deal Fanatic
User avatar
Mar 23, 2008
9751 posts
6140 upvotes
Edmonton
Rick007 wrote:
Jan 18th, 2019 4:16 pm
It is not unusual for high rise apartment managers to demand an extra fee from anyone operating an air conditioner in the summer months. In my city, they charge a onetime annual fee of $50. They can also specify what type of AC units you can install. These are primarily the floor models with a hose that goes to the window. Nothing is allows to hang over the windows sill. In an apartment an additional $50 could come close to doubling the cost that a tenant would normally use.

Some folks have already given references to the cost of a block heater, but if you had a KiiiaWatt ($30.99 at Amazon) you could measure the actual KWH used and calculate the cost. Then you could make a mutually agreeable deal with the landlord.
The extra fee would have been fine if it was included in the lease. But AFAIK, the landlord can’t unilaterally decide to tack on a fee just because he feels like it.

C
Member
Apr 30, 2004
270 posts
76 upvotes
I use synthetic oil in my 15yo car. Never had any starting problems even at -27C.
Never heard anybody at work or friends still using block heaters .
Member
Jan 7, 2006
386 posts
144 upvotes
Toronto
Naz wrote:
Jan 18th, 2019 4:52 pm
I use synthetic oil in my 15yo car. Never had any starting problems even at -27C.
Never heard anybody at work or friends still using block heaters .
I use dino oil in my 16 year old beater, it starts fine in -35 but I like to have heat before I get to the end of the street so I plug it in. There's the case for an autostarter, but that would cost more than the car is worth.
Deal Addict
User avatar
Oct 15, 2007
4350 posts
1635 upvotes
I’m interested to know how this turns out.

On one hand did the OP disclose that their car requires a block heater and therefore requires their car to be plugged in overnight using what can be considered unnecessary power.
Or should the landlords lease state that add on unnecessary convenience high power consumption items such as a window ac or in this case a block heater be an additional charge to the tenant
Everything has been said before, but since nobody listens we have to keep going back and beginning all over again. - Andre Gide
Sr. Member
User avatar
Feb 25, 2004
556 posts
133 upvotes
Longueuil
My car doesn't seem to have issues but I use the heater with a timer when it is cold. It reduces the gas needed (and electricity is cheap and clean in Québec).

"At -20°C, block heaters can improve overall fuel economy by as much as 10 percent. For a single short trip at -25°C your fuel savings could be in the order of 25 percent."
http://oee.nrcan.gc.ca/transportation/i ... fm?attr=28
Try not! Do or do not, there is no try...

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