Automotive

Honda direct injection engine carbon buildup?

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  • Mar 13th, 2019 4:58 pm
[OP]
Deal Addict
Mar 20, 2005
1898 posts
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Maple

Honda direct injection engine carbon buildup?

Hello, I assume like most direct injection engines Honda will face the same issues of carbon buildup on valves due to fuel not acting like a solvent and washing carbon like traditional engines.

Is there a way to mitigate this at all ? I rather service this regularly to maintain fuel efficiency and hefty maintenance down the line.
47 replies
Deal Guru
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Feb 11, 2007
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Oakville
Typically you would regularly spray cleaner in your intake. Seafoam is popular, but ones with Techron are supposed to work better.
Temp. Banned
Jun 18, 2008
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Montreal
corcoran_chris wrote:
Mar 10th, 2019 9:02 pm
Hello, I assume like most direct injection engines Honda will face the same issues of carbon buildup on valves due to fuel not acting like a solvent and washing carbon like traditional engines.

Is there a way to mitigate this at all ? I rather service this regularly to maintain fuel efficiency and hefty maintenance down the line.

Yes.

Buy a Toyota.
Deal Expert
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Jul 30, 2007
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^ I thought you would say “buy electric car” Grinning Face With Smiling Eyes
Deal Addict
Sep 8, 2017
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A friend of mine with a GDI Hyundai uses CRC Intake Valve Cleaner every so often as preventative maintenance.
Deal Fanatic
Mar 21, 2002
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Only fill up with a Tier 1 gas.

But let me ask you this one question:
Where are all these posts from Honda owners complaining about horrible carbon build up on their DI engines?
Deal Fanatic
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Dec 28, 2007
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Alberta
corcoran_chris wrote:
Mar 10th, 2019 9:02 pm
Hello, I assume like most direct injection engines Honda will face the same issues of carbon buildup on valves due to fuel not acting like a solvent and washing carbon like traditional engines.

Is there a way to mitigate this at all ? I rather service this regularly to maintain fuel efficiency and hefty maintenance down the line.
This is the least of your worries. Read up about Honda engines and oil dilution.
Deal Addict
Jan 20, 2005
3639 posts
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Thornhill
Alot of manufacturers have figured out ways to route the blow by not back into the intake (a more advanced oil catch can). Not sure about Honda but Mercedes has done this. You can install an oil catch can which catches the blow by but you have to remember to check on it and empty the reservoir.

Edit: Also there's no point in asking good questions on RFD, too many people like the above posters that don't know the answer and instead take the discussion elsewhere. Find a Honda forum and ask there as well.
Last edited by mau108 on Mar 11th, 2019 1:11 pm, edited 1 time in total.
Member
Feb 8, 2010
274 posts
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corcoran_chris wrote:
Mar 10th, 2019 9:02 pm
Is there a way to mitigate this at all ? I rather service this regularly to maintain fuel efficiency and hefty maintenance down the line.
Lease, don't buy.
Deal Expert
Aug 22, 2011
30065 posts
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Ottawa
All you can do is mitigate the issue.
Walnut blasting is the only sure way to get rid of the deposits.
Sr. Member
Jan 12, 2008
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TDot
woof wrote:
Mar 10th, 2019 10:53 pm
Only fill up with a Tier 1 gas.

But let me ask you this one question:
Where are all these posts from Honda owners complaining about horrible carbon build up on their DI engines?
Good point, Honda has been using DI for a few years now. A quick Google search and (unlike Audi) I was unable to find any evidence of carbon buildup issues.
Deal Addict
May 4, 2014
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Toronto, ON
VTEC kicks the carbon off the valves. Exercise it regularly and you'll have no problems.
Newbie
Feb 7, 2017
70 posts
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can of seafoam in the gas tank when it's half full. Buy either seafoam spray or any generic throttle body cleaner, take off the air intake and spray into the throttle body towards the valve. Activate the valve to get behind it as well. put down some papertowel or some cloths to catch any cleaner that comes out of the throttle body. After reattaching everything idle for a bit and go for a good drive (give it some gas to get any left-over carbon to come off the throttle body)
Deal Addict
Jan 17, 2009
1738 posts
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Toronto, Ontario
Just wait for it to get bad and then get carbon cleaning.

All the other stuff is just snake oil and on a long enough timeline you will need carbon cleaning anyways.

Some brands/engines have it worse (ie VW's). It's not like it's hugely expensive or you have to get it cleaned often so don't worry about it and drive the car as you normally do.

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