Pets

How to choose a breeder / seller to ensure a healthy dog

  • Last Updated:
  • Dec 13th, 2018 12:27 am
[OP]
Member
Jul 1, 2017
212 posts
84 upvotes

How to choose a breeder / seller to ensure a healthy dog

I'm looking for a dog, but I'm a little confused reading so many ads and listings.

a lot of people will call themselves "registered breeder" - I have a feeling that doesn't mean much

Most ads show: "vet checked" , "comes with documentation" , "first shots taken"
Are there things to watch out here? or are some of those common phrases intentionally misleading?

Does CKC really mean much besides that the lineage is pure ?
A purebred dog does not mean the dog is healthy, in fact in some cases being so pure will ensure some of the genetic predispositions (i.e. guaranteed health problems) in certain breeds.
Or do the CKC -registered breeders take extreme caution to check everything, because they need to keep their CKC reputation ?

can anyone shed some light onto this subject ?

thanks
4 replies
Deal Addict
Feb 16, 2008
1248 posts
284 upvotes
Coming from someone that is just recently buying a dog, I had the same challenge. In the end I went with a breeder that had a good online reputation. With that said there is always the risk of getting an unhealthy dog.
Member
Jan 31, 2008
495 posts
158 upvotes
Toronto
yellowtrash wrote:
Dec 3rd, 2018 11:42 am
I'm looking for a dog, but I'm a little confused reading so many ads and listings.

a lot of people will call themselves "registered breeder" - I have a feeling that doesn't mean much

Most ads show: "vet checked" , "comes with documentation" , "first shots taken"
Are there things to watch out here? or are some of those common phrases intentionally misleading?

Does CKC really mean much besides that the lineage is pure ?
A purebred dog does not mean the dog is healthy, in fact in some cases being so pure will ensure some of the genetic predispositions (i.e. guaranteed health problems) in certain breeds.
Or do the CKC -registered breeders take extreme caution to check everything, because they need to keep their CKC reputation ?

can anyone shed some light onto this subject ?

thanks
Some tips I was reading was to make sure you can visit the puppy and see what their living conditions are. Also make sure their parents are on site.
Deal Addict
User avatar
Aug 10, 2015
1357 posts
316 upvotes
St. Catharines, ON
Here's some copy and paste from my dog's breeder's website, that highlight some of the good things to look for.

HEALTH TESTING
We test the adults before we breed. Health tests results are available upon request for both dam & sire. Along with a full blood profile, tests are conducted for DM, vWd, Eye Certification, OFA Hips & Elbows, OFA Cardiac, OFA Thyroid, OptiGen PRA and NE.

CONTACT
Ask lots of questions before you choose your breeder. You are always welcome to call us and ask any questions.

VISIT
Our doors are always open to you to come and visit and see our puppies and adult dogs.

SOCIALIZATION
Our puppies are extremely well socialized. They spend their first four weeks with their mother and then move into the living area of our house where they see people every day and get lots of affection and attention. Our resident cat, has a very important job – she teaches our puppies to respect and live with cats.

TEMPERMENT TESTING
Our puppies are temperment tested so that we can help you choose the right companion for your family.

SUPPORT
Our interest in our puppies doesn’t end when he or she goes home with you. We care. We are always available to answer any questions you have. Your puppy will receive a birthday card each year and included in the card is a self-addressed stamped postcard for you to send back to us with any comments regarding health issues or brags you want to share.
Sr. Member
Apr 6, 2008
697 posts
308 upvotes
Don't forget there are many happy, healthy, loving dogs available in shelters. The price is much more reasonable, $400 or so for a shelter vs sometimes 1500$ or more from a breeder. Also shelter dogs come fixed so there's another 400-500$ savings there as well. Some shelters even have purebreds if you don't want a "mutt". I have adopted over half a dozen cats and dogs from shelters and I don't agree with supporting people who breed for profit. There are many caring responsible breeders, but also just as many looking to make a quick buck. With everything, do you your research and check it out. Plan on keeping this pet for life.

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