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How to Find Out How Much a Particular House Sold For?

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[OP]
Deal Addict
Jan 28, 2008
1052 posts
50 upvotes
Toronto

How to Find Out How Much a Particular House Sold For?

Where can I find out how much a particular home sold for?

Thanks.
75 replies
Deal Addict
Feb 24, 2008
1831 posts
486 upvotes
Mississauga
Conquistador wrote:
Oct 18th, 2011 9:48 pm
Why do you want to know? IOW, what makes you think that it's any of your business?
lol - wow

i think you need to contact someone with full access to MLS (ie. realtor or someone in that space); if you have a real estate agent buddy, him/her could do that for you; otherwise, most likely have to pay a fee to get that info
Member
Apr 27, 2008
401 posts
33 upvotes
Conquistador wrote:
Oct 18th, 2011 9:48 pm
Why do you want to know? IOW, what makes you think that it's any of your business?

Maybe they are looking to sell their house and a similar one down the street sold last month?
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Dec 18, 2006
1838 posts
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Privacy laws prevent this information to be given out to just anyone without confirmation of their identity - therefore typically a valid ph number or contact information/id is required to acquire this info. We have a request form on our site for this as well, however we do contact you and have a brief discussion with you prior to divulging such information.

Similarly, you can get this from the land registry office while providing ID, however they charge a small fee for it.
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Conquistador wrote:
Oct 18th, 2011 9:48 pm
Why do you want to know? IOW, what makes you think that it's any of your business?
What makes you think that it's any of your business why he wants to know?

To the OP:

There are several ways to go about this. As was pointed out above, working out something with a realtor is probably the best way if you want to find a lot of historical selling prices for homes unrelated to your own. If you're doing this for the purpose of disputing a provincial assessment, there is an "AboutMyProperty" information service offered by MPAC (Municipal Property Assessment Corporation):
MPAC wrote:Through this service, you can access property assessment information, site information, lot size and recent sales information on your property and similar neighbourhood properties of interest – free of charge.
(emphasis mine) Here is the website: http://www.assessmentontario.com/pages_ ... operty.asp

You can also use the same site to purchase historical "Assessment, Site, Structural, and Sales data" for any property, at a cost (I believe it's $25 per lookup).

Finally, you can go through the Land Registry. I don't know anything about the process, but in theory all land transfer and sales data is public information and should be accessible to anyone who pays whatever administrative fee they presumably have. Here is the list of locations: http://www.ontario.ca/en/information_bu ... L02_165696

Good luck, and post back if you find out anything more (I wouldn't mind more info on this myself).
Member
Aug 1, 2008
282 posts
49 upvotes
Toronto
molo wrote:
Oct 18th, 2011 10:52 pm
Finally, you can go through the Land Registry. I don't know anything about the process, but in theory all land transfer and sales data is public information and should be accessible to anyone who pays whatever administrative fee they presumably have.

It costs $8 to do a title search at the land registry office (20 Dundas St. W., Suite 420). It will give you a full history of sale prices for a particular address, although it only shows deals that have already closed, and won't tell you the price of a house that "sold" last week.

For that $8, you also get:
1) Name(s), addresses and date(s) of birth of the owner(s), even if they don't live in the house (and it's a rental);
2) Name(s) of the previous owner(s) of the house; and
3) Details on the last mortgage registered against the house (usually name of the bank, amount of the mortgage and interest rate).
Deal Addict
Mar 10, 2011
1823 posts
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Toronto
Conquistador wrote:
Oct 18th, 2011 9:48 pm
Why do you want to know? IOW, what makes you think that it's any of your business?

By law it is public information because assessors use the values of the sold properties to base the assessment of YOUR(all other) properties in the neighbourhood and taxes are based on this.
Deal Addict
Mar 10, 2011
1823 posts
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Toronto
Islington wrote:
Oct 18th, 2011 11:07 pm
It costs $8 to do a title search at the land registry office (20 Dundas St. W., Suite 420). It will give you a full history of sale prices for a particular address, although it only shows deals that have already closed, and won't tell you the price of a house that "sold" last week.

For that $8, you also get:
1) Name(s), addresses and date(s) of birth of the owner(s), even if they don't live in the house (and it's a rental);
2) Name(s) of the previous owner(s) of the house; and
3) Details on the last mortgage registered against the house (usually name of the bank, amount of the mortgage and interest rate).

+1 thats the way to do it..Unless you can get an agent to give you tthe price.
Deal Addict
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Apr 6, 2008
1599 posts
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Not exactly what OP is looking for but there is a new service launched last week which can give you rough value for any house for fee without you having to give your own details. It may be a useful tool for prospective sellers or buyers.

Here is the link http://www.newswire.ca/en/story/857701/ ... y-centract

http://www.zoocasa.com/en/zoopraisal
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Member
User avatar
Apr 22, 2011
432 posts
39 upvotes
In Nova Scotia viewpoint.ca shows how much a house has last sold for in the last ten years as well as estimated value of homes.
Warning: Anything I write is to the best of my knowledge, I may be wrong about things, I may have a different thought on things than yourself and I do not always follow the herd. I am also a RFD personal finance addict.
Member
Oct 5, 2009
469 posts
38 upvotes
Calgary
shapeshifter wrote:
Oct 19th, 2011 7:51 am
Wish we had something like zillow.com for canada

+1

but here the MLS is a cartel and even zillow themselves are unable to get the data.
Deal Fanatic
User avatar
Apr 29, 2008
5310 posts
1258 upvotes
Montreal
In Quebec:
http://www.registrefoncier.gouv.qc.ca/Sirf/

It costs 1$ for each record you look for if you look online. If you want to see the details of the sale from the lawyer, it will cost you extra 1$. Each document you get is 1$. It typically costs me 2$ par house.

You need the numero de lot, which you can find on the annual municipal tax bill. The annual tax bill can be found on the website of the city.

Therefore, steps are:
1) Find the municipal tax bill on the city's website (using the address of property)

2) Find the numero de lot /description cadastrale on the tax bill. (there are lots of numbers, the one you need shall be ABOUT 7 numbers)

3) one-time: Register an account on http://www.registrefoncier.gouv.qc.ca/Sirf/ (you can also enter all your info each time... easier to create an account once).

4) Search for the property using the numero de lot on http://www.registrefoncier.gouv.qc.ca/Sirf/.

Very useful to know the transaction date (for how long they had the house?) and the price that was paid.

I knew of house flipping thanks to research like this, gives you a perspective on the price asked.
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Dec 19, 2001
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Fernando Po
molo wrote:
Oct 18th, 2011 10:52 pm
What makes you think that it's any of your business why he wants to know?

To the OP:

There are several ways to go about this. As was pointed out above, working out something with a realtor is probably the best way if you want to find a lot of historical selling prices for homes unrelated to your own. If you're doing this for the purpose of disputing a provincial assessment, there is an "AboutMyProperty" information service offered by MPAC (Municipal Property Assessment Corporation):

(emphasis mine) Here is the website: http://www.assessmentontario.com/pages_ ... operty.asp
So, how do you do it free of charge? They require you to have a login name and password that require payment.
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Deal Addict
Jun 20, 2009
1049 posts
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Just go to the realtor's website and see. It will show you the asking price. So then you gotta think a bit, is the house in a good neighborhood where house sell for asking price or more. Or is it in a neighborhood where house sell below asking price. From that you can estimate a baseline. Thats it.

P.S. If you cant find it on the realtor's site, then go to http://www.realtor.ca/
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