Careers

How To Leave A Job

  • Last Updated:
  • Mar 19th, 2017 11:40 pm
Tags:
[OP]
Member
Mar 30, 2011
259 posts
64 upvotes

How To Leave A Job

Hi everyone,

Context:
- Just a month in
- Small company, 10 people max.
- One meeting room with walls that are paper thin

--

So It's likely I'll be leaving my current role, for reasons I won't get into now. But the question is how do I quit? We only have one room that is glass and paper thin, so other employees will hear everything. And with a team so small, I don't really want to set a time to meet in the room to share my news and then have everyone listen in (esp if he doesn't take it well).

The alternative is to set a coffee meeting and head out to chat...but there's no precedence for "coffee meeting," so I imagine this raising red flags for my boss and he will immediately know what's up, which again will be awkward and uncomfortable.

What I was thinking, (and let me know if this is not the best route)...was to send an email to my boss/msg him (we have a team chat channel) and just let him know that I am leaving the company (and why I didn't want to go the meeting room route), and would like to grab him to chat outside about it in detail.

Any feedback would be great.
26 replies
Deal Addict
Jul 13, 2009
2429 posts
390 upvotes
After hours coffee meeting.
Member
Oct 3, 2009
427 posts
117 upvotes
Just stay late and wait for everyone to leave. Bosses are usually the last to leave.
Member
User avatar
Dec 28, 2010
236 posts
75 upvotes
Intotheblue12 wrote:
Feb 8th, 2017 12:32 pm
Just stay late and wait for everyone to leave. Bosses are usually the last to leave.
This ⬆

... it's not uncommon to write a brief letter. Do you really want to discuss in depth why you are leaving? I would just put in my notice and leave the why in the letter.
Actions speak louder than words
Deal Addict
User avatar
Jul 19, 2012
1619 posts
164 upvotes
Email your boss, you've only been there one month, no big deal.
Deal Addict
Nov 24, 2004
3223 posts
294 upvotes
Toronto
Prepare a formal letter of resignation (printed, signed and dated). The letter should just include your decision to leave, your timeframe (when your last day will be) and good wishes / thanks -- it should not include your reason for leaving.

Find a time to meet with your boss in-person (not by e-mail) and tell him or her of your decision, then give him or her the letter. Don't get into details, unless asked. Avoid burning bridges at all costs.
Deal Addict
User avatar
Mar 16, 2010
1250 posts
504 upvotes
Hamilton
Two middle fingers and a cloud of dust.
Spidey wrote:
Jan 7th, 2016 10:59 am
You're 26, and your mom still buys your toilet paper.
Jr. Member
Mar 7, 2011
104 posts
7 upvotes
JHW wrote:
Feb 8th, 2017 2:08 pm
Prepare a formal letter of resignation (printed, signed and dated). The letter should just include your decision to leave, your timeframe (when your last day will be) and good wishes / thanks -- it should not include your reason for leaving.

Find a time to meet with your boss in-person (not by e-mail) and tell him or her of your decision, then give him or her the letter. Don't get into details, unless asked. Avoid burning bridges at all costs.
This does sound like a good option. Would anyone else ask for a reference in this case if they ever needed one? Or is that just obnoxious?
Deal Guru
User avatar
Apr 16, 2002
12914 posts
8284 upvotes
Toronto
notfromqc wrote:
Feb 8th, 2017 11:34 am
also Homer

"Had one yesterday and there was a full slice of onion no thinner than a polio shoe.

I cried out in despair." RFD user Dingus
Sr. Member
User avatar
Dec 20, 2005
893 posts
13 upvotes
Wondering if there is a best day of the week and best time of day to give the notice.

Like it would be awkward on a Monday morning...since your boss and maybe colleagues would state and wonder.

But I do agree about the formal letter and email route. This way it is formal and on record.
Sr. Member
User avatar
Dec 20, 2005
893 posts
13 upvotes
JHW wrote:
Feb 8th, 2017 2:08 pm
Prepare a formal letter of resignation (printed, signed and dated). The letter should just include your decision to leave, your timeframe (when your last day will be) and good wishes / thanks -- it should not include your reason for leaving.

Find a time to meet with your boss in-person (not by e-mail) and tell him or her of your decision, then give him or her the letter. Don't get into details, unless asked. Avoid burning bridges at all costs.
Any thoughts if my direct manager is off? I might be closing in on the two week mark. So if my Manger isn't in till Monday and I am scheduled to start Monday April 3rd.....does that mean I will be short one days notice to give the standard two weeks notice?
Sr. Member
Sep 13, 2016
727 posts
304 upvotes
pogs wrote:
Mar 16th, 2017 4:31 pm
Any thoughts if my direct manager is off? I might be closing in on the two week mark. So if my Manger isn't in till Monday and I am scheduled to start Monday April 3rd.....does that mean I will be short one days notice to give the standard two weeks notice?
You could get in touch with the HR if you have one, or the person who is in charge in manager's absence.
Also make sure that you start a formal resignation process. A verbal discussion is often not sufficient.
It will make sense to drop an email or write a letter and request receipt and request an immediate meeting, so that you have documentary evidence.

Also, there is no obligation to provide reason.
Sr. Member
User avatar
Dec 20, 2005
893 posts
13 upvotes
IndyBeak wrote:
Mar 16th, 2017 10:10 pm
You could get in touch with the HR if you have one, or the person who is in charge in manager's absence.
Also make sure that you start a formal resignation process. A verbal discussion is often not sufficient.
It will make sense to drop an email or write a letter and request receipt and request an immediate meeting, so that you have documentary evidence.

Also, there is no obligation to provide reason.
Thank you. Appreciate the advice as I wait on pins and needles. It has been just under three weeks since they advised the start date was April 3. I really thought it would be all set by now. I was going to give 2.5 weeks notice , but that seems unlikely.

Top